Grass grub treatment Suscon Green

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4 years 10 months ago #547164 by BenH86
Are paddocks have a big grass grub problem. After talking to our local farming shop they sold us Suscon Green. We have told them that we haven’t got a lot of land for our sheep to graze.
We have treated 90% of our property with Suscon Green as adviced but know we find on internet that we cannot graze our paddock for atleast 6 to 8 weeks.
We have lambs due in the coming weeks and are a bit worried as we don’t have any grass left on the paddocks the can graze.
Anyone have any experience with Suscon Green?

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4 years 10 months ago #547165 by LongRidge
Absolutely no idea, but the general rule for chemicals and animals is that you must not sell them for meat if you are using the product "off label". In this situation that will be 90 days after the stuff was put on. Also, get the withholding period from the manufacturers or off the label rather than some random internet site :-).

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4 years 10 months ago #547173 by Stikkibeek
Putting up starling boxes is a lot cheaper and ultimately safer for your animals than chemicals. it was the DDT once used for grass grub that poisoned the starlings and put a dangerous chemical into the food chain.
I am not familiar with Suscon Green, but the with-holding sounds quite a lot. Can you get grazing nearby until your 6 weeks are over?

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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4 years 10 months ago #547174 by Ronney
I've had no experience with Suscon Green either. We do have small patches of pasture that obviously have grass grub but not sufficient that I feel I need to do anything about it, possibly because of the starling population which I actively encourage.

6-8 weeks is a long withholding period, and not knowing the chemical involved, I would be inclined to look for grazing off-farm if that is possible - and it will probably be difficult to obtain as few want sheep in to graze.

Sorry that we're not much help and a bit of a learning curve for you I'm afraid.

Cheers,
Ronnie

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4 years 10 months ago - 4 years 10 months ago #547183 by Stikkibeek
Wiki and others have a lot to say about the toxicity of the agent in this product. chlorpyrifos

One application. 3 years control against grass grub in pasture. If this is good for three years it is a serious product. Must be applied by an approved handler, and if in granular form, must not be left on the surface of the soil. I sincerely hope you had it properly applied and did not broadcast it. If you have young children, keep them off the pasture too as the long term effects from exposure to neuro-toxins can be insidious and damaging

From the Haz sheet.
NB: suSCon Green is not suitable for broadcast or roller drilling methods of pasture sowing.

TOXICITY:
Harmful - may be harmful if swallowed, inhaled or absorbed through the skin
Harmful - may cause reproductive/developmental damage from repeated oral
exposure.
Toxic - may cause damage to the nervous system from repeated oral exposure at
high doses.
ECOTOXIC: Very toxic to fish with long lasting effects. Avoid contamination of any
water supply with product or empty container. Harmful to terrestrial vertebrates.
Very toxic to terrestrial invertebrates. Do not leave granules on the soil surface


I sincerely hope the sales person went over the Haz sheet information with you, before you purchased and wasn't the sort of person who just looks for a sale.
Worth reading the downloadable info from Nufarm which appears to be liquid form, Nufarm and, this one Nufarm

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
Last edit: 4 years 10 months ago by Stikkibeek.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Ronney, BenH86

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4 years 10 months ago #547193 by Anakei
Looks nasty :( People get all wound up about Roundup when there is much worse stuff out there.
Anyway it looks like your farm shop only told you half the story - it's a hard lesson though.....

Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener
The following user(s) said Thank You: Ronney

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4 years 10 months ago #547195 by Ronney
Good God, I use most sprays with reservations knowing that if I didn't use them at all I would have no hope of keeping the farm in a condition to graze animals. But this stuff I think I could live without! As I said in my earlier post, we only have small pockets of grass grub which are short-lived and not worth worrying about - and the starlings do a good job.

Anakei, I would have to agree with you 100% on the glysophate (Roundup) debate. I'm told by the pundits that I shouldn't use it - but those same pundits don't have an answer as to how I'm going to get rid of Australian Sedge which not only takes over pasture but also our native bush.............! Go figure.

Ben, inadvertently you have probably brought up a point many of us were unaware of (I certainly wasn't) and unfortunately it is going to cost you far more than grass grub. Put it out in your neighbourhood that you are looking for grazing for 3 months for in-lamb and lambing ewes (how many do you have?) - vet clinic, RD1, Farmlands, your local fb, word of mouth etc.

Cheers,
Ronnie

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4 years 10 months ago #547196 by BenH86
We trusted on the expertise of our local farm shop. its a lesson hard learned and next time i'll definitely will not trust them when the try selling us something. We feel a bit stupid by trusting them but as we are new to all this its something that happens unfortunately.
At the moment we are trying to fix the problem, a local contractor is going to plow the paddocks at 50cm deep to turn up some cleaner ground and mix the granules with more ground over a bigger area and then we will start seeding new pasture. hopefully this will help us on the long turn and make the paddocks a bit safer/ healthier for us as i'm not really happy with the toxic stuff as you can imagine.
unfortunately this will not help us on the short term. we have decided to look for grazing close by but this is very hard to find. ( we only have a total of 7 sheep) our other options is to sell of the ewes and ram and only keep 3 lambs from last year as we still have 2 tiny paddocks that are not treated.

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4 years 10 months ago #547202 by Muz1
Suscon Green is registered as a product to be applied by an approved handler or applied under supervision of an approved handler, The supplier is in deep dodo's if they have not ensured the product will be so applied and I think a purchaser signature is required at sale. I gather you are not an approved handler or you would have read the label and been aware of application requirements. The withholding period is mainly to protect production contamination, export particularly. Lesson learn't and the ploughing option is a wise remedy. New grass grows good animals.

Everything Must be Somewhere

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4 years 10 months ago #547228 by Ronney
Ben, do not feel stupid - ever! None of us are a walking encyclopaedia and often rely on the expertise of others - think doctors, lawyers, dentists, vets etc. You asked a question, got an answer and acted on it, the fact that it turned to shit was not your stupidity.

Without having had any experience with this product, I feel that your next course of action makes for common sense in the longer term but not helpful in the shorter term. Hard to know what to do. Certainly I would be looking for grazing off farm. How many acres do you actually have? and how many haven't been treated? Personally, me being me, if I had a group of sheep I liked and were easy to handle, I would be inclined to hang on to them and hope for the best. Will your sheep eat hay and grain - given the number you have this could be something worth looking into to carry you over the worst. On average I run up to 70 odd sheep, most don't eat hay or grain because they don't need to but have about half a dozen that will. These are spoilt rams, rigs and micky-mouse pets. If push came to shove, as in your case, I would put them in with those that didn't and within a week they would all be eating grain and hay - animals are great copy-cats. Could this be an option for you do you think?

I'm sorry this has happened to you, the process of learning can be very hard indeed. Would be interested to know how you go.

Cheers,
Ronnie

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4 years 10 months ago #547233 by BenH86
Thanks for all the help and idea’s.
We have decided to keep the adult sheep for now. Last year we already decided that this will be the last year for the adult 3 ewes, as They become really old and have some hoof problems. We kept 3 lambs from last season to take over. They are really friendly and easy handling.
We have 1,5 acre of paddocks. At the moment all except 750m2 is treated. We have made and extra paddock in the orchard (just fenced of all the tree’s), sacrificed an old veggie garden and we have a section in front of our property we’re we can keep them some hours to still have some fresh grass to there diet. And it’s safe us mowing it.
Luckily they eat grain, pellets and hay. We have ordered extra meadow, lucerne and straw. Hopefully together with the sheep pellets this will give us some time.
We haven’t found any grazing yet but we keep looking. Most grazing possibilities don’t accept sheep or they want a minimum amount of sheep. According to the farmer who will fix our paddocks we are looking to 3 to 4 months till they can slowly start grazing our own paddocks again.

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