Successfull Silage

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5 years 2 months ago #544796 by Shadyacres
Is it feasable to make silage in a sterile food grade plastic drum supposing you compressed it and sealed it air tight???

Also since i dont have any large round bail handling gear yet, any reason why i couldnt hang a bail with a steel pole thru the middle and roll of needed amount, so long as i was sure to wrap it again or vac pac a large bag around it to seal out the oxygen??
It wound roll off like handie towel but slow and heavy, could always rig a break line around it if need be too, anybody ever tried such a procedure??

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5 years 2 months ago #544802 by muri
Replied by muri on topic Successfull Silage
Have you heard about listeria from poorly made silage or spoilt silage?
www.farmanddairy.com/news/bad-silage-can...isteriosis/2002.html

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5 years 2 months ago #544809 by Sue
Replied by Sue on topic Successfull Silage
No idea whther packing grass in a plastic drum would work, but I have my doubts. Proper wrapped baleage has several layers of plastic and over time the excess moisture manages to seep out between the layers. I think you would just end up with a soggy stinking mess.

How long would you have a big bale open for?
We don't have either a tractor or big bale handling machinery but have managed to use big bales, both round and square for many years. We've got 67 big squares to handle this way this winter. Last year with the drought and following a wet winter we must have handled double that amount- not bad for a couple of retirees past their three score years and ten!

Sometimes we have a big bale open for up to a week before it is used up, usually at least 3 days.
With squares we just cut a flap at one end of the plastic and leave the rest sealed. Take off slices and load onto a Ute for distribution and then tie the strings back tightly and replace the flap over the cut end- tucking into the strings or placing a loop around the whole lot if its windy.

For big rounds, standing on end, cut right around at ground level, remove the plastic 'hat,' remove strings or netting, fork on to trailer as much as needed, going round and round the bale, retie string around, replace hat of plastic and secure around the outside. Good baleage will stay fresh if recovered for at least a week if not longer.

Sue
Labrador lover for yonks, breeder of pedigree Murray Grey cattle for almost as long, and passionate poultry person for more years than I care to count.

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5 years 2 months ago - 5 years 2 months ago #544813 by Shadyacres
Replied by Shadyacres on topic Successfull Silage
Hmm sounds nasty too, some petrie samples after ph test would be a good peice of mind, and if i can put a tap on one end and drain if need be then stetilize and seal shouldnt get to soggy and rotten.
Thanks for your info Muri
Last edit: 5 years 2 months ago by Shadyacres.

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5 years 2 months ago - 5 years 2 months ago #544814 by Crusha
Replied by Crusha on topic Successfull Silage
How quickly will you go through a big round bale? If it is good quality baleage and well made bales then once opened, you can leave them for at least a week in most conditions before the baleage will start to heat up, even then it will be fine for "Dry" and older stock.

There should not be water leaking from within them. If water can get out then air can get in. Generally when I cut our own or where I work's bales open there will be a small amount of water run out from the bale.

At home we have no handling equipment for Big Rounds, but, I do have the ability to move them from the line they have been stacked in.

Leaving the bale on its flat end I cut the plastic wrap off and unwind the netting. Then I just unwind the amount of baleage I need before wrapping either a short strop or even just a piece of baling twine around the bale about 50cm from the top. This stops the top from collapsing and pulling the baleage down into a bit heap. (Biggest danger is the chooks scratching away at the bottom of the exposed bale!) You can put a small tarp (about $20 from the hardware store) over the top and then the strop or twine around that to keep rain off if you want.

I generally don't bother because in the middle of the "season" we go through a bale every three days or so. But even on the 'shoulders' of the season we use a bale a week.
Last edit: 5 years 2 months ago by Crusha. Reason: spelling

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5 years 2 months ago #544829 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Successfull Silage
Round or square bales of balage are made out of almost dry hay, so do not usually have much moisture. Some farmers with tractor equipment make them like silage, so they do ooze, and the bales collapse. When making balage and silage it is very wise to inoculate the grass just at baling so that the good bugs grow faster and make the conditions inside the bale or silage pit unsuitable for the nasty bugs to grow. You would not be able to do this, so you must be very certain that only ruminants can eat it, and not pregnant ones at that. The cutting length should be at least 100 mm, so that the animals can chew their cud / ruminate. So don't use a lawnmower.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Shadyacres

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