Cold call from NZ Home Services, Solar installations?

More
7 years 1 month ago #531579 by Ruth
We've had a lot of no-message calls on the answerphone over the last couple of days and finally I answered to an Australian voice telling me their Solar Representative is in my area and we should arrange a time to have him call.

Anyone else dealt with these people or had this happen. It smells a bit like all that forced air ventilation selling which went on for a while.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531582 by Stikkibeek
First question you should ask, is "What is my area" If they don't know, or are vague, then they are telling lies.
We get a lot of such calls here, usually at dinner time. I usually tell them where to go. had some young girl ring us once with this wonderful investment scheme that would make us rich. I asked her, why a young and seemingly intelligent girl like her was wasting her talents as a telemarketer, when there were riches to be made in investment schemes. She asked me to recommend one! :whistle:

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531585 by Ruth
They're definitely aware of where they're working and I have no doubt their rep would turn up here to make his "presentation" but I suspect I already know where I'll go for solar experience and a plan when the time comes. This would be only an information-gathering exercise for me, but as I didn't seek it, I doubt I'll pursue it in any case. Got other things to do with more priority in the mean time.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531605 by spark
Hi Ruth,

I haven't dealt with cold-calling solar people before, but I would be very wary... (pushy sales tactics to sell a possibly expensive and or poor quality system that might not be a good match for your situation?).

Were they trying to sell grid-connected or stand-alone solar?
A word of caution is that Unison (the lines network in Hawkes Bay), has introduced higher fixed monthly charges for customers with grid connected solar - if your lines network has not already done so, I would not be surprised if they did so in the near future.

Cheers

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531608 by tonybaker
yes, these solar companies are getting desperate cos they know the end is nigh. Power companies will stop buying power and then the maths don't add up.

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531610 by spark
It's not that the power companies will necessarily stop buying your solar power, its that generally speaking, they won't pay very much for your solar power compared to what they charge you for grid power (eg buy from you at something like 7c/kWh and sell to you at something like 30c/kWh).

The economics usually look much better if you are going to use your own solar power rather than selling it to a power company - do you have large daytime load? (air conditioning? electric hot water heating? or a workplace full of lights, machinery and computers that mostly only get used during the day?)

Also, there are ways to have solar power and grid power in the same premises, without having the solar connected to the grid, thus avoiding the high monthly line charges that grid-tied solar can incur.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531776 by max2

spark wrote: I

Also, there are ways to have solar power and grid power in the same premises, without having the solar connected to the grid, thus avoiding the high monthly line charges that grid-tied solar can incur.


I would be interested in hearing more about that please (new thread perhaps?). We certainly don't produce enough electricity from our panels to warrant going off the grid full time, but if there is a way to separate the two I would be keen to know. Is it possible to ''switch'' from grid to solar in times of general grid failure (I suppose that means the purchases of batteries, but I feel a bit of a dick having forked out substantial $$'s for the solar and not having use of the sun on our panels when the main grid is down even just to run the freezers/water pump).

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • sandgrubber
  • sandgrubber's Avatar
7 years 1 month ago #531798 by sandgrubber
I'm negotiating with a local company for a solar installation. They recommend NOT doing grid tied, cause, as Spark says, they buyback rates are low and there are line charges to pay. They point out that there are a number of battery-like options, including using excess power to heat water (and turning your water heater off at night) and charge an electric vehicle. I'd think it would also be possible to 'store' excess power by diverting it to your freezer and dropping the temperature by an extra 10 degrees when there's excess power . . . .so it won't draw so much current when there's no solar available. Don't know if anyone does the freezer thing.
My non-expert read is that batteries options are likely to change and get cheaper over the next ten years or so, while solar collection technology is not going to get a whole lot cheaper. So putting panels up now and hoping to have affordable batteries in the future is a reasonable strategy. Do others agree?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531799 by Ruth
Certainly in regard t the battery tech.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531801 by Rokker
Absolutely. Lithium-ion polymer batteries are constantly being improved these days because of the demand from a wide variety of applications.

Do NOT cross this paddock! ... Unless you can do it in 9 seconds, 'cos the bull can do it in 10!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531803 by tonybaker

So putting panels up now and hoping to have affordable batteries in the future is a reasonable strategy. Do others agree?


well, panels lose their efficiency over time and they will get cheaper also. I believe in 10 years roofs will have built in panels anyway. Probably better to invest the money in insulation meantime.....

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531815 by A Hard Rain
I expect power companies will easily pick up the revenue they lose from solar power systems from electric car charging although I doubt that will effect their penalty rates for solar.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531817 by Hawkspur
Panels lose about 0.5% generating capacity each year, so you'd get quite a bit of power over the next 10 years and not lose much capacity if you installed some now rather than waiting for battery tech to improve.
There haven't exactly been major leaps in battery tech that have reduced costs when looked at over the life of the battery, and I personally wouldn't count on it happening quickly. Some may get a bit cheaper if more take that type up, but there's no guarantee that will happen.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531819 by LongRidge
Many and most of the "Rare Earth Elements" are mined in China. These are used in electronics, PV systems, and new-generation batteries. When they decide they can ransom the world, the price of these will become unaffordable.
The following user(s) said Thank You: powerguy

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 1 month ago #531825 by Rokker
Very true, LR. As far as batteries are concerned the rare earth metal used in the production of nickel-metal hydride batteries is Lanthanum. While most of it is mined and separated at the moment in China, it's prevalent pretty much world-wide. So if China does try to hold the world ransom over it, I'm sure the other countries already producing it will make sure that tactic won't pay!

Do NOT cross this paddock! ... Unless you can do it in 9 seconds, 'cos the bull can do it in 10!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.196 seconds