What wood burner to choose???

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7 years 6 months ago #527615 by jojokiwi
We are in North Canterbury and have to pick a wood burner for the home we are building on 4ha

With all the earthquakes etc I'd like to be able to cook on it as well as heat the home... :blink:

Does anyone have a wood burner they would recommend for a large open plan living area?

Thanks
Newbie-in-training

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7 years 6 months ago #527619 by Mudlerk
I thought the Metro line a great leap forward when they were invented over a decade ago, and have had good results from the four I've since installed -- all in different houses. However, a lot of other NZ companies seem to be making models very similar to them nowadays.

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7 years 6 months ago #527638 by 1justin
Replied by 1justin on topic What wood burner to choose???
firenvo contessa

good wetback

good fire

cast iron top plate so you can put something on top if you want

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7 years 6 months ago #527639 by cowvet
I can answer that question in two words.

Woodsman Tarras.

We have moved from a cold home to a home where people walk through the front door and usually say '..... It's hot in here". We're often opening doors and windows because it gets too warm in our open plan living space. Love it!


I love animals...they're delicious

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7 years 6 months ago #527641 by WillNZ

1justin wrote: firenvo contessa

good wetback

good fire

cast iron top plate so you can put something on top if you want


Second this.. huge heat output and is excellent for cooking on (stews and suchlike). Wetback is second to none.
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7 years 6 months ago #527642 by LongRidge
We have a Contessa, but I would prefer a Lady Kitchener. With an LK, you can stack the longer wood in lengthways, so that it won't fall out. With the Contessa long wood has to go in sideways so it is prone to falling out.
Remember to get a model that can be damped down. Town models are made to burn faster so that less smoke is made.
Also, ensure the wood that you use is very dry. Mine is stored under cover for 3 years before it is used.

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7 years 6 months ago #527665 by muri
Replied by muri on topic What wood burner to choose???
I love my Condor, its multifuel, 17 kw output and has a large cook top and oven which is big enough to do roasts etc.
As when many of these ovens, the quality of the wood you are burning will be one of the biggest things that impacts on heat output.
A lot of the cast iron stoves today are made of much poorer cast iron than in the past so have shorter life spans
The Condor is excellent quality steel

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7 years 6 months ago - 7 years 6 months ago #527666 by muri
Replied by muri on topic What wood burner to choose???


I should add that I think these retail for under $5000 or you can direct import for a much better price
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7 years 6 months ago #527668 by kate
Replied by kate on topic What wood burner to choose???
Another vote for Firenzo - either Contessa or Lady Kitchener. Great fires B) B)

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7 years 6 months ago #527782 by Jen - Featherston
Another Contessa fan here - I've installed 3 of these now and I'm just about to build another house and will be putting one in there.

236m2 home is heated well and wetback kept us in hotwater (2 adults and 3 kids) over the whole winter. He billy is on the top heating cup of tea water and we usually have a perpetual cast iron pot of soup on the go. Pop in a bit of gum, mac or manuka over night and open it up in the morning and shes away again. same deal on the way to work :)

Sometimes its not only what you say, its the way you say it that counts.

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7 years 6 months ago #527802 by tonybaker
the best option is to have radiators installed, unfortunately not many plumbers are familiar with it. Heat always rises and the way our door frames are constructed, it is difficult to get the heat to travel from room to room unless a fan kit is installed. The trraditional kiwi home has a superheated lounge and not much else!

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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7 years 6 months ago #527817 by 1justin
Replied by 1justin on topic What wood burner to choose???
radiators are probly not as good as haveing the water pipes in the slab, if your building new im guessing you are haveing a slab, for anyone that is building new it is a good option to consider, they are usually run by a lpg or diesel boiler, and are keept heating your house constantly so your house is always at your desired tempreture where as a fire is a bit of a hit and miss (to hot to cold), these can also be heated by a wood boiler but costs are getting up there at that point

at the end of the day if you have a new home its not super long or big and you have a good wood burner and a good heat transfer system, installing radiators is not nessacery as they are no where near as cold as uninsulated houses

where as if you have old house that is loseing heat like a sieve then radiators off a wetback could be a good option to get heat to other ends of the house

side note... when your home is at the preline stage.. when it has had the batts installed but not the gib go into the house and make sure there is no gaps and that the wireing is not affecting it to much as the people instaling your pink batts are on contract and want to get it done as fast as possible where as youl be living with the insulation for the rest of your life

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7 years 5 months ago #528174 by Southern Bloke
I have had Yunca fires in all my houses. I have never had a problem with any of them. Just select the highest kilowatt rating or BTU rating you can find. The Yunca Wedge is a great log burner but I don't know if they come with a cooktop.

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7 years 5 months ago #528186 by tonybaker
"radiators are probably not as good as having the water pipes in the slab" it depends on where you live! Most places in NZ are warmed by the sun after 9am. Having a warm floor all day is not great. It takes along time to warm a floor before you get any heat into the home. Radiators can be thermostatically controlled and are easily repairable, pipes in the floor are not. Also pipes in the floor are costly to install and need more fittings. In floor heating is mainly used in public buildings where doors are opening frequently and a long heating season is likely. If I lived at the bottom of the South Island, I might consider it!

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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7 years 5 months ago #528222 by Anakei
when we built our house we installed in floor piping heated by a boiler. It was a mixed sucess with good background heat but we still needed extra heat at night, It never quite got to a comfortable ambient temperature. Mind you we built a Lockwood with double height vaulted ceilings....

Following the recent earthquakes I would now think twice before installing water pipes in the slab. If it cracked and the pipes ruptured then the the house could be a write off

Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

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