The Un-greening of our countryside

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7 years 5 months ago #526900 by muri
On friday I drove to my grazing block through lush green pastures, on saturday they started looking a bit yellow and by today they have turned positively orange. My main concern with this is the dairy cattle grazing the block, being milked daily and no doubt the milk is being sold to consumers.



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7 years 5 months ago #526902 by Rokker
I'd say they'd be noticing quite a drop in milk production by now!!

Do NOT cross this paddock! ... Unless you can do it in 9 seconds, 'cos the bull can do it in 10!

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7 years 5 months ago #526903 by Ruth
A little glyphosate is good for the soul.

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7 years 5 months ago #526905 by spark

Ruth wrote: A little glyphosate is good for the soul.

Is it likely that the farmer has sprayed the pasture so that they can plant a feed crop (or pasture renewal)?

I understand that recently "glyphosated" (and thus wilted) grass is palatable to stock, but not sure how good an idea it is actually letting them eat it though...

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7 years 5 months ago #526907 by Cigar
It is not uncommon for glyphosated pasture to be grazed or made into silage, it reduces the turnaround time for sowing maize and other crops. I know a few farmers who won't do it, one said he wouldn't like roundup on his breakfast so won't make his cows eat it either.

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7 years 5 months ago #526909 by Ruth
Common practice, so it must be good for us.

Yes, they'll be planting a crop of some kind, or simply doing pasture renewal, which also involves a hell of a lot of herbicide use. It's one reason I chose never to take on a Kikuyu war: I'd have needed shares in Monsanto.

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7 years 5 months ago #526911 by muri

Ruth wrote: A little glyphosate is good for the soul.


Frankly I fail to see how it can be good for any part of our bodies, ethereal or physical.
Am just trying to support the third person I know from horticulture with a brain tumour and using sprays in their work life.
Mere chance or a correlation between the two?

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7 years 5 months ago #526912 by Ruth
It was not a serious comment, Muri.

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7 years 5 months ago #526914 by Stikkibeek

Rokker wrote: I'd say they'd be noticing quite a drop in milk production by now!!

Rokker, apart from your beautiful oxymoron, it also seems perverse to be knocking off the means of that production in favour of growing a crop to improve it.


And, just because Monsanto claims it to be safe to graze the sprayed pasture, doesn't make it so.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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7 years 5 months ago #526916 by Muz1
I doubt they put cows in milk on the treated paddock-probably dry stock but I still would not graze a treated pasture.

Everything Must be Somewhere

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7 years 5 months ago - 7 years 5 months ago #526918 by tonic

Muz1 wrote: I doubt they put cows in milk on the treated paddock-probably dry stock but I still would not graze a treated pasture.


It is quite a common practice to put milking cows on round up sprayed grass, or to spray the grass to wilt it prior to making it into silage.
Last edit: 7 years 5 months ago by tonic.

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7 years 5 months ago #526919 by Ruth

Stikkibeek wrote: ...it also seems perverse to be knocking off the means of that production in favour of growing a crop to improve it.
...

If pasture production will be slow or non-existent when the crop is in full production, it does. Short-term future-proofing. It's what now passes for good planning, despite the costs to the environment, people's and animals' health ...

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7 years 5 months ago #526920 by Furball
...and what costs. I must admit, I didn't really realise all the effects that glyphosate has. Just flicking through this paper,
www.omicsonline.org/open-access/detectio...000210.php?aid=23853
there are references to it chelating minerals in plants, being a teratogen, being toxic to DNA, and inhibiting a number of mammalian enzyme pathways. So much for: "it only affects plants". I wouldn't like to be consuming either milk or meat from those cattle.

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7 years 5 months ago #526921 by Ruth
We did also post the recent ERMA (was that the report, I'd have to try and find the post again) report on all the research into glyphosate in recent times which concluded it is not quite as terribly toxic to everything as has been repeatedly stated.

However it isn't food by any stretch of the imagination so I think we're sensible not to eat it. Mind you neither is a lot of the stuff some people ingest now so it probably doesn't matter too much to many of them.

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7 years 5 months ago #526924 by muri
The cattle are dairy cattle and are being milked, they have been on the land all the time since spraying
I have also seen a report showing Roundup s not as toxic as some research has shown, but you need to know who is paying the researchers to carry out the research. Suffice it to say, some countries have banned its use altogether so may fell there is something not quite right with its use
I hope they are not making infant formula from milk off this farm. Its totally put my off buying ordinary milk and definitely will switch to organic from now on

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