Cladding types and wood stoves

More
7 years 8 months ago #526627 by Runamuck
I’ve just read with interest the thread on the regulations for building your own home, which is timely as that’s what we will be doing in the next couple of years. At the moment we are still at the designing/planning stage and one question I would like to ask the forum is what people’s experience has been with various types of cladding.

We are leaning towards board and batten, but I’ve seen a couple of homes where they’ve broken up that look with a bit of colour steel/painted corrugated iron type cladding which also appeals; mainly for the durability/low maintenance aspect. Hubby however is not convinced as he thinks it will creak and groan as it heats and expands and then cools again.

Where we are building has a wide range of temperature (heavy frosts and high rainfall in the winter, up to 43 degrees C plus in summer) so big wrap around verandas are a must, as is a single storey building (future proofing against old knees and hips!); but, other than saying “oohh look at that” as we zoom past a house, I can’t find anything that fits that spec that I can show him.

Also, has anyone had any experience with wood burning stoves – good or bad. Friends had a Wagner which seems to send out as much smoke as heat, but in all honesty that could just be the way they used it!

Ok so that wasn’t just one question. Thanks in advance :)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526656 by G n T
Hiya,
We have board and batten cladding- no problems with it. Our house does creak and groan and carry on in temperature changes but it is interior lined in ply and I had always thought this was why. You get used to it. :-)

Our wagner is wonderful, if you can imagine a house with the floor plan of a large 4 bay shed, the wagner is near the wall of bay 2 and heats bay 1 &2 very well (our bedroom and the kitchen). It would not heat the whole house though and it's just a small house(110sqm). We have a friend who uses one to 'power' underfloor heating which might spread the heat better, as I'm always boiling the cylinder.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Runamuck

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526660 by Geba
Replied by Geba on topic Cladding types and wood stoves
Our new house is under construction, almost finished, and has been designed and built to the current building code.

We looked at using board and batten cladding but were told that this mode does not comply with the current building code because there is a direct, un-water-proofable penetration between the outside of the building 'skin' and the building's framing via the nails through the battens.

Maybe your local building authority has a different opinion.

After looking at all the options I chose 19mm bevel back weatherboard, fixed using recessed and sealed nails.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526661 by Hawkspur
The only cladding that is low maintenance is brick or stone or concrete. Steel cladding needs regular repainting/coating, just like timber. Even brick, stone and concrete need some maintenance.

Verandahs are great as a transition space and sheltered outdoor area, but they can reduce the light inside and stop useful heat gain in winter. Unless windows are very high ( over 2.5m ish), an eave of about 900mm is sufficient to stop most summer heat/sun and still allow the lower angled winter sun. Work out where you need the shelter and where you might want the sun.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Runamuck

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526662 by Rokker

Geba wrote: We looked at using board and batten cladding but were told that this mode does not comply with the current building code because there is a direct, un-water-proofable penetration between the outside of the building 'skin' and the building's framing via the nails through the battens.


And yet this product appears to be widely used with building code approval and growing popularity. Go figure!

Do NOT cross this paddock! ... Unless you can do it in 9 seconds, 'cos the bull can do it in 10!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526665 by Hawkspur
Geba: I am gobsmacked by a Council saying that. That's nuts regarding the nail penetrating the skin of the building. It is no different to say, a rusticated weatherboard fixing. It does depend on a few factors regarding the risk of the building form and exposure to weather, but board and batten is acceptable for most cladding risk situations if done over a drained cavity, and sheltered by a decent eave.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526675 by Rokker
My thoughts exactly, Hawkspur. What's the difference between nails penetrating vertical battens and horizontal weatherboards?

Do NOT cross this paddock! ... Unless you can do it in 9 seconds, 'cos the bull can do it in 10!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526676 by Jontashya
No problem using board and batten. We have just finished building with a combination of it and brick.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Runamuck

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526705 by Alan Gilbert
Board and batten is not good way of cladding a house, in my opinion. The battens will always warp, and can leave a gap between the board and the batten. If you simply must use that system, make very sure that the battens are put on with the grain the right way around, so that when they inevitably do warp, they will warp so the the edges remain close to the boards and the centre of the batten tries to pull the nails out, not the other way round.

When we built seven years ago the cheapest cladding was brick, particularly using double-height bricks (=half the labour). And the gable ends are cedar weatherboards.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Runamuck

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526738 by Geba
Replied by Geba on topic Cladding types and wood stoves
To answer the question above:

The as-explained-to-me difference between nails penetrating vertical battens and horizontal weatherboards, as proposed for our house at least, is exposure.

The heads and thence the shanks of the batten nails would have been exposed to the outside air, providing a path, through the movement by heating and cooling of the cladding, for moisture to wick through to the house framing - a path further supported by the warping to which Alan refers.


In contrast, the nails in our weatherboards are all subsurface. They have been punched below the outside surface, with the cavity above them sealed and then painted over.

And in reference to board & batten being an acceptable cladding when fixed over a drained cavity - yes, in some/many building situations, this is so. I should have been more specific and explained that our query pre-building was about using direct-fixed board and batten, not cavity-fixed.

However, for a building in our hills, which are ruled to be a 'very high' wind zone, even cavity-fixed board and batten was not deemed suitable for the front and rear faces of the house at the very least, and 'dubious' for the sides even though they are under verandahs, so we chose bevelback weatherboard.

Direct fixed rusticated (flat) weatherboard was not recommended because there's no means for any driven-in moisture to drain downwards. We could have used it over cavity battens, but decided against that.

Comparing what we've been required to build with what's already built in our area, some of it over 100 years old, has been interesting. Our current house dates from 1904-ish and has been re-clad at least twice in different places with a mixture of bevelback and rusticated weatherboard, board and batten, flattened tin, and fibro sheets. None of these 'claddings' appear to be letting water in, despite having exposed nails in various places. The rot in the walls all emanates from window sills & sealings (which were another hot topic of discussion when designing the new house), which are also at least the second lot fitted to this house.
A neighbour has 100 year old rusticated weatherboard which hasn't warped, rotted or leaked, and another building has fibro cladding over bevelback weatherboard. The fibro has cracked with building movement and fallen off in places, but the boards are hanging on.
It seems to have been roofs and window sealings which have taken the brunt of our very-high-wind-zone weather, rather than walls.

Given we can see compare the effects of the local weather on the variously constructed local buildings with what we've had to build, I reckon our new place should last for 300 years easy.

As for woodburners: I've chosen a W300 (made in Greece) for the kitchen and a Metro Mega for the rest of the house. Neither are needed yet but I am looking forward to seeing how warm we are next winter.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Runamuck

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago - 7 years 7 months ago #526740 by Rokker

Geba wrote: To answer the question above:

The as-explained-to-me difference between nails penetrating vertical battens and horizontal weatherboards, as proposed for our house at least, is exposure.

The heads and thence the shanks of the batten nails would have been exposed to the outside air, providing a path, through the movement by heating and cooling of the cladding, for moisture to wick through to the house framing - a path further supported by the warping to which Alan refers.


In contrast, the nails in our weatherboards are all subsurface. They have been punched below the outside surface, with the cavity above them sealed and then painted over.


Thanks, Geba - that makes sense. To be honest I've always been a fan of standard horizontal weatherboards - tried and proved.


Geba wrote: The rot in the walls all emanates from window sills & sealings (which were another hot topic of discussion when designing the new house), which are also at least the second lot fitted to this house.


Back in the day we used to fit galvanised tin flashings at the ends of window frames before installing them to drain moisture out from the framework. I've been surprised at how often this simple fix has been overlooked in recent years.

Do NOT cross this paddock! ... Unless you can do it in 9 seconds, 'cos the bull can do it in 10!
Last edit: 7 years 7 months ago by Rokker.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526838 by tonybaker
Board/batten looks nice and lends itself to DIY. My experience with wooden homes is that they are noisy, same as plastic spouting. Most board/batten now seems to be based on a sheet of exterior plywood, fancied up with battens. To me this is a better option as it gives bracing and better weatherproofing.
Whatever you do, go for a really good building paper and one that is fire resistant.
I would check with your council to see what is allowed first.
Re heating: it is difficult to get hot air to move anywhere other than straight up! If you really want whole house warmth, then you need hot water radiators.

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)
The following user(s) said Thank You: Runamuck

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526893 by skyline_glenn
I am a roofer and have done a fair bit of domestic cladding. horizontal Coloursteel will have to be on a cavity along with the trapezoidal profiles when run vertically, vertical corrogated iron doesn't require a cavity. It also needs to be washed every 6 months or so, especially under the soffits. I think it can look really good when it is used to break up other cladding types. You need to be carefull who you get to install it as some workmanship I have seen is terrible, especially around windows and garage doors. I can post some pictures of what I think is tidy detailing and also some rough work If you like.

Glenn
_______________________
23 acres, a cat(olive), Maddison the chocolate lab, 2 ewes, Mumma the cow, 4 steers, 10 chooks and lots of hares.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526915 by Runamuck
Thanks Glen, photos would be great.

Also many thanks to everyone for your replies - that's exactly the sort of thing we needed to know and really helpful :)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 7 months ago #526923 by neil postie
Hi we purchased a property with a huge 6 bedroom house which is clad in zincalum corrugated iron (laid horizontally). Its about 11 years old and no problems yet. Heaps of windows and ranch sliders but no leaks. The house creaks a lot but that mainly seems to come from the iron roof expanding and contracting. We think upon it as the house talking to us. It also had a rubbish wood burner with it so we replaced it with a new metro mega LTD which heats the house very well, and it's a BIG house, took 5 minutes to change over $350 for the coucil inspection!
The following user(s) said Thank You: Runamuck

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.178 seconds