Evergreen shelter tree decisions

More
8 years 1 month ago - 8 years 1 month ago #521006 by jojokiwi
Have been trawling the internet about shelter belts and despite getting totally confuzzled, I think i've settled upon planting an evergreen shelter belt on our southern boundary and a deciduous one on the eastern. The evergreen finalists are:

Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicate)
Silver Fir (Abies verjari
Sheoak (Casuarina gluca)?? Cant find many nurseries that have these tho :(
Redwood (Sequoia Sempervirens)
Acacia / wattle but not sure how they would look trimmed into a shelter belt?

For the Eastern boundary I'm thinking of deciduous Alder trees.

Does anyone have any thoughts, comments or experiences on these trees? We are in North Canterbury on clay soils which seems to rule quite a few out. I don't want to go down the eucalyptus/macrocarpa/pine route if I can possibly help it.

Even tho its not very nature-friendly I'm thinking of doing a long line of the same species rather than mixed native planting - would rather a consistently planted boundary line rather than a mixture.

When planting shelter belts, does fencing go, then irrigation and finally plants?

Thank you oh wise ones :-)
Last edit: 8 years 1 month ago by jojokiwi.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 1 month ago #521008 by Stikkibeek
For natives you'd have to know what does well in your area in any case. If on a boundary, you will still have to have a boundary fence, and put a several hot wires on it if you have a neighbour with cattle.
Remember too, that whatever you plant on a southern boundary, then it is the neighbour's northern boundary and shade will effect them.
We lost our lovely pines so will be replacing with a mixture of totara and bottlebrush. I might also throw in some cabbage trees all of which do well here.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 1 month ago #521009 by Furball
You mention "trimming into a shelter belt". Beware of using conifers if you are planning to trim on an ongoing basis. Conifers are more difficult to trim properly than other trees, as they will not re-sprout if trimmed back to bare boughs. This means you have to trim them carefully and more often. If a deciduous tree belt gets a bit scraggly it can be given a really hard trim and sprout back ok. The same type of hard trim on conifers will either kill them or leave a line of mostly dead branches with an occasional sprig of green, which looks horrible. Any reason why you don't want to use natives? As they evolved here, they are able to cope with the climate pretty well...

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 1 month ago #521012 by Rokker

jojokiwi wrote: Does anyone have any thoughts, comments or experiences on these trees?


I've just checked through your posts on this subject and can't see anywhere that you've mentioned a reason for the shelter belt you're planning. A lot depends on what you want the shelter belt to do.

I know you've probably trawled the internet for info, but a site with good info on design is here . It's an Aussie site, but the principles are pretty much the same as for NZ.

Do NOT cross this paddock! ... Unless you can do it in 9 seconds, 'cos the bull can do it in 10!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 1 month ago #521014 by FrozenThunderbolt
Sheoak runs and suckers like buggery, western red cedar is allergenic - not good if you have asthma.
I like alders - acceptable forage, fix nitrogen, add organic matter.

4.79HA of volcanic soil (1/3 hill to be planted in deciduous forest someday), brewing, orcharding, gardening, blacksmithing, 2 Dexters, chooks and ducks to come + a bit of everything else.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 1 month ago #521018 by LongRidge
Native plantings have been growing at the entrance to the Christchurch Saleyards for about 20 years now. Have a look at them if they are still there.
Before planting along a boundary fenceline, check the local Council bye laws about how big and how close. Here the trees have to be so far away from the neighbour that a huge amount of land is lost if the neighbour does not agree to allow you to plant close.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 1 month ago #521020 by muri
There have been quite a few threads along this line recently and it may pay to look back and search the topic shelter belts on this forum,
Thats a pretty useful article that Rokker reffered to , it puts things in very clear terms as its important to understand how shelter belts work in order to plant them up.
Some of your choices such as Redwood wouldnt work as they are not a shelter belt tree, they cant tolerate wind and need protection from it so would never grow above the height of the other trees around them because the tops cant take the wind. Wattles in some areas are considered weedy as they self seed, it might not apply to your climate.
If you have stock, then grow plants you can utilise as fodder for them eg with the deciduous try willows and poplar. Both offer real nutritional advantage for animals , especially in times of drought. The poplars are fast growing and you can top the foliage every year to feed to the animals.
I like to think as a shelter belt as a multi functional thing, not just a row of trees. Look at plants that will bring in birds and bees while at the same time provide shelter and forage for animals

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 1 month ago #521026 by jojokiwi
Thanks for all the replies. I'm learning a lot from LSB.

We are wanting to plant both boundaries for a few reasons. We want to shelter from both the southerly and easterly wind. Another biggie is that I'd like to eventually not be able to see our neighbours....hence my preference for evergreen. Neighbours are two-storied places so we'll need pretty tall shelter belts. We are in North Canterbury but have clay soils. One day we would like to run stock on the property so I'd ruled out leyland cypress and macrocarpa. Not sure what that leaves.... There are two pine shelter belts already on the property which are trimmed annually - so thats something that we'll already be doing.

I didn't realise that cedar was allergenic...I was keen on avoiding pine for that reason too.

So much to take into consideration.

Fences are so much simpler :-)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 1 month ago #521028 by LongRidge
Remember that new varieties of poplar, that are resistant to all sorts of diseases, have also been made to be unpalatable to possums, so are somewhat unpalatable to stock. They do blow over. A couple of years ago, the West Coast Sth Island had a strong wind event. I drove through about a month afterwards and noticed that the native plants had not blown over, but the pines, gums and other non-natives had been smashed.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.128 seconds