Bee swarm

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8 years 1 month ago #520115 by wttmf
Replied by wttmf on topic Bee swarm
The wasps are after the willow aphid. A new introduction, it was first found in 2013. Its why the wasp numbers have increased.

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8 years 1 month ago #520116 by spoook
Replied by spoook on topic Bee swarm
.... and having the willow aphid the wasps have a great supply of food allowing them to breed more and in turn eating more monarch eggs, caterpillars and chrysalis. Sometimes it is just out of balance. :(

There are no bad questions only those that are not asked.
"You are responsible, forever, for what you have tamed"
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8 years 4 weeks ago #520162 by smallblock
Replied by smallblock on topic Bee swarm
Iv got one too. Bees.
I just leave mine there doing no harm. And will do good for the garden.
I think of it as a good thing.
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8 years 4 weeks ago #520169 by Aquila
Replied by Aquila on topic Bee swarm
Its not a good thing as wild hives harbour a very infectious disease which will move into commercial hives very easily.

Where in the country are you small block?

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8 years 4 weeks ago - 8 years 4 weeks ago #520176 by smallblock
Replied by smallblock on topic Bee swarm
Bay of plenty.
Which disease?
Last edit: 8 years 4 weeks ago by smallblock.

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8 years 4 weeks ago #520181 by Aquila
Replied by Aquila on topic Bee swarm
American foulbrood. Only approved treatment in hives in nz is contain and burn

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8 years 4 weeks ago #520184 by smallblock
Replied by smallblock on topic Bee swarm
Fairly unlikely, this taken from the net.

Robbing can be an important cause, but when it leads to an AFB infection, it is usually the result of inadequate levels of beehive inspection (i.e. poor beekeeping management practice). Robbing of feral colonies is not a major source of AFB, at least in most situations and areas of New Zealand.

It's mostly from poor hive management.
I did bee keeping for a few years.

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8 years 4 weeks ago #520185 by Stikkibeek
Replied by Stikkibeek on topic Bee swarm
A hive gone feral is much more likely to get veroa and perish. All the more reason to capture if possiblle and save, but often bees that have swarmed get into impossible places to rescue. We had an active hive living in the wall of our house for some years until they suddenly vanished and then a rat moved in to polish off the accumulated feast. We got the rat, but bees didn't return and OH blocked up the places they were getting in to stop a new swarm from finding what ever remained of the smell of the honey

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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8 years 4 weeks ago #520186 by Aquila
Replied by Aquila on topic Bee swarm

smallblock wrote: Fairly unlikely, this taken from the net.

Robbing can be an important cause, but when it leads to an AFB infection, it is usually the result of inadequate levels of beehive inspection (i.e. poor beekeeping management practice). Robbing of feral colonies is not a major source of AFB, at least in most situations and areas of New Zealand.

It's mostly from poor hive management.
I did bee keeping for a few years.


I guess you just can't tell some people who would prefer to use the internet than listen to people who have bees.

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8 years 4 weeks ago #520201 by Ruth

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8 years 4 weeks ago #520205 by Stikkibeek
Replied by Stikkibeek on topic Bee swarm
There's a big one (free of wasps) in the Dargaville museum, which was taken out of a hollow tree. The way they are built is really quite incredible.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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8 years 3 weeks ago - 8 years 3 weeks ago #520220 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Bee swarm
Wasp nests in the ground are very easy to get rid of once you have found the main entrance hole. What I do is mark the spot with a stick or white electric fence standard during daylight. Then in the evening I half fill a beer stubby with petrol, find the entrance hole with a torch, and put the bottle into the entrance hole, and leave it there. In a few days, remove the bottle. There are many soil organisms that will convert petrol to non-toxic compounds (unlike when lead was put into petrol), so long-term soil pollution is a very small concern.
Last edit: 8 years 3 weeks ago by LongRidge.

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8 years 3 weeks ago #520229 by Aquila
Replied by Aquila on topic Bee swarm
Sounds familiar yesbut......er longridge

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8 years 3 weeks ago #520231 by wttmf
Replied by wttmf on topic Bee swarm
Did 8 nests like LR said last year, going to do first one of the year tonight.
I had to buy a box of beers to make sure I had 11 back up empty bottles... :silly:

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8 years 3 weeks ago #520275 by Farmersden
Replied by Farmersden on topic Bee swarm
So the bee swarm has gone, they just disappeared overnight. We do have some wasps left in neighbouring willows presumably going for the aphids you described but not in great numbers.

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