Ragwort

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8 years 4 months ago #517541 by NZDan
Ragwort was created by NZDan
:whistle: Hi there all you knowledgeable people. Ragwort, OK, I know the cows aren't allowed to eat it, and they won't generally go near it unless it has been snapped/cut and they go for the sweet taste.
Soooo, I got annoyed trying to pull/dig out the ragwort and attacked it with the scrub cutter, I know now it was probably a dumb thing to do. My question is once I have picked up the tops that I cut off, how long before the stalks that are left in the ground die off and the cattle can go into that paddock, or do I have to pull out the stalks or spray them first?

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8 years 4 months ago - 8 years 4 months ago #517544 by cowvet
Replied by cowvet on topic Ragwort

NZDan wrote: :whistle: Hi there all you knowledgeable people. Ragwort, OK, I know the cows aren't allowed to eat it, and they won't generally go near it unless it has been snapped/cut and they go for the sweet taste.
Soooo, I got annoyed trying to pull/dig out the ragwort and attacked it with the scrub cutter, I know now it was probably a dumb thing to do. My question is once I have picked up the tops that I cut off, how long before the stalks that are left in the ground die off and the cattle can go into that paddock, or do I have to pull out the stalks or spray them first?


I think that if you have cut it off at ground level it's just going to regrow. If you slashed at it with seed heads on then you may have made your weed problem worse unless you remove all the flower heads and burn them.

www.massey.ac.nz/massey/learning/college...database/ragwort.cfm


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Last edit: 8 years 4 months ago by cowvet.
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8 years 4 months ago #517545 by Ruth
Replied by Ruth on topic Ragwort
The bits in the ground usually grow into tough, multi-crown plants which are much harder to pull out. If you've so much ragwort you need to scrub-cut, you might want to consider spraying. Using Metsulfuron on plants while the flowers are still young and bright will make the seeds infertile too, which saves a lot of work if you time things right.

We cut flowers and remove them from the paddock and pull the plants or go back and spray them (depends how many plants in an area). If you leave any cut flowers they immediately seed.
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8 years 4 months ago #517548 by 2D
Replied by 2D on topic Ragwort
Twenty-odd years ago when we moved here, the whole valley was yellow with ragwort at this time of year. Over the years we have sprayed and pulled then got help from the ragwort beetle thanks to MAF or DOC or whoever it was. That has been absolutely marvellous. We were advised that we were to pull the plants when they had flowered, but to leave them when they were cabbage-shaped, as food for the beetle. I have had plenty of practice pulling them over the years so I knew anyway that when they flower is the time to pull them. I now pull any I see on the roadsides - can we be the only people round here who remember how important it is not to let them seed? I also ask permission from neighbours to go on their land to do it, which seems to prod them into doing it themselves anyway. But I would hate to see it revert to what it used to be like. The ragwort beetle is fantastic - has cleared this whole valley except for an odd plant which appears, probably from old seed in the ground.

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8 years 4 months ago #517549 by wttmf
Replied by wttmf on topic Ragwort
Ragwort is symptom of certain soil conditions and there are other methods of control.

"Weeds are the fixers or bandages on bare or depleted soils..................So Steve collected the ragwort and made a plant extract and returned it to the land as a sprayed on tea. Within one year he had got rid of the ragwort. "

soilbeneath.blogspot.co.nz/2015/04/enhan...is-with-compost.html
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8 years 4 months ago #517617 by powerguy
Replied by powerguy on topic Ragwort
Ragwort will also regrow from large root fragments so pulling really is only effective on smaller, young plants. The only surefire way to control larger plants is to spray. As has been mentioned, if in flower it may be necessary to cut and collect the flower heads as even a dying plant can put enough juice into the tips to produce viable seed.

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8 years 4 months ago #517644 by natacha
Replied by natacha on topic Ragwort

wttmf wrote: Ragwort is symptom of certain soil conditions and there are other methods of control.

"Weeds are the fixers or bandages on bare or depleted soils..................So Steve collected the ragwort and made a plant extract and returned it to the land as a sprayed on tea. Within one year he had got rid of the ragwort. "

soilbeneath.blogspot.co.nz/2015/04/enhan...is-with-compost.html


I was planning on doing the same with thistles... my thistle juice is waiting in a bin.

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8 years 4 months ago #517646 by natacha
Replied by natacha on topic Ragwort
On the bright side here's what Juliette de Bairacli ("The Complete Herbal Handbook For Farm And Stable") has to say about Ragwort:
" The whole plant possesses a very pungent, rather acrid smell. Animals do not find this plant attractive eating; indeed it can cause severe digestive disorders. Its use is purely external, and it has important properties for drawing out impurities and dissolving gatherings (whatever that is?). The flowers are used.
Use External: Treatment of all skin ailments, especially gatherings, tumours, fistulas, inflamed areas."

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8 years 4 months ago #517650 by Ruth
Replied by Ruth on topic Ragwort
My calves quite like eating the flowers, I suspect. It's a bugger of a plant.

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8 years 4 months ago #517659 by wttmf
Replied by wttmf on topic Ragwort
Juliette de Bairacli ("The Complete Herbal Handbook For Farm And Stable") = great book. She also has a book for common herbs for human animals too, well worth having.

There is a country calendar episode on the place. tvnz.co.nz/country-calendar/episode-8-chaos-springs-5874292 .

We have no ragwort here Taupo/Reporoa border. Well not at our place or others close by. Not sure why not, our soils are crap, maybe the climate. We had a frost just last week.

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8 years 4 months ago #517834 by 2D
Replied by 2D on topic Ragwort

powerguy wrote: Ragwort will also regrow from large root fragments so pulling really is only effective on smaller, young plants. /quote]

I know from very long experience that if you pull a plant in the "cabbage-looking" stage, i.e., the young plant, you will get a ring of new plants next year from the roots that have snapped off. However, if you wait until it is well in flower, the roots have degraded and it will pull fairly easily and you will not get a ring of new ones next year. You might of course get new ones where seed has dropped.

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8 years 4 months ago #517840 by katieb
Replied by katieb on topic Ragwort

2D wrote:

powerguy wrote: Ragwort will also regrow from large root fragments so pulling really is only effective on smaller, young plants. /quote]

I know from very long experience that if you pull a plant in the "cabbage-looking" stage, i.e., the young plant, you will get a ring of new plants next year from the roots that have snapped off. However, if you wait until it is well in flower, the roots have degraded and it will pull fairly easily and you will not get a ring of new ones next year. You might of course get new ones where seed has dropped.


I would say that ring of plants is actually the other seeds from when a plant seeded there germinating.....because the soil was loosened up to make it easier


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8 years 4 months ago #517955 by RaeM1
Replied by RaeM1 on topic Ragwort
WE have grubbed the ragwort ever since we came here 16 years ago, the first few years I would get trailer loads of the stuff, and used to pile thm into the swamp under some trees, and then pile scotch thistles on top, and jump on the heap, gradually we have managed to eliminate it, and other than about 20 plants I have grubbed out over the last week we seem to be free of it, I now put the grubbed bits on the roadside layby so that the flowers and plants get a good flattening, and as every tom dick and harry seem to use our layby when they are testing cars or just needing to get off the road for a while, it gets pleanty of traffic. WE have never sprayed it at all.

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8 years 4 months ago #517957 by Stikkibeek
Replied by Stikkibeek on topic Ragwort

RaeM1 wrote: WE have grubbed the ragwort ever since we came here 16 years ago, the first few years I would get trailer loads of the stuff, and used to pile thm into the swamp under some trees, and then pile scotch thistles on top, and jump on the heap, gradually we have managed to eliminate it, and other than about 20 plants I have grubbed out over the last week we seem to be free of it, I now put the grubbed bits on the roadside layby so that the flowers and plants get a good flattening, and as every tom dick and harry seem to use our layby when they are testing cars or just needing to get off the road for a while, it gets pleanty of traffic. WE have never sprayed it at all.

Ha! I did that to get rid of bear's breeches out of our garden. All the little root bits no matter how small will regrow, but they are fleshy and putting them on the drive to be flattened, turned them into non viable pieces which I could then safely compost, so after a couple of years, it was gone.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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8 years 4 months ago #517972 by powerguy
Replied by powerguy on topic Ragwort
Studies by the old Noxious Plants Board show root fragments regrow.

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