Egg incubator - made in China

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8 years 6 months ago #514354 by Somewhere
My incubator is currently on day 24. I can still see several pipping ones, but not sure if any more will hatch. I have got 8 chicks so far. This first one hatched on day 21, the last one hatched on Day 22. They were not sticky when they came out of shells. Humidity control was easier than I thought. I am looking for ways to increase my success rate. I am thinking of using dry hatch method next time as some of you suggested. Could any one let me what the humidity inside incubator when you run dry hatching? Thanks very much.

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8 years 6 months ago #514360 by Inger
Replied by Inger on topic Egg incubator - made in China
If the hatching is stretching out so far, I would suspect the temperature variation within the incubator. Are you running your incubator at 37.5 degrees C ? Is the fan running correctly? I gave up on incubators that didn't have a fan, as the hatch rates were fairly poor.

Also, the quality of feed that you give your adult birds in the weeks leading up to collecting eggs for incubation, really does affect the quality of the chicks and if they are strong enough to hatch well and thrive. Laying pellets is fine for maintenance for hens laying eggs, but for a breeding group of birds, you need a type of feed that gives the breeders everything they need to produce good quality ovum and sperm. I used Feed Me Milling's 'Heritage breeding formula' to get that really good hatch rate of ducklings. Give it a try and see how your hens get on. Also, worm your birds leading up to breeding season, so that they are getting the best from their feed and some of it isn't getting diverted into feeding the parasites.

45 hectares between Whangarei and Paparoa. Registered Dexter cattle, Wiltshire sheep - black, white & pied.
New Hampshire Red poultry & Dorking poultry. Pilgrim Geese, Appleyard Ducks.
A cat called Pusscat and still looking for another heading dog.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Somewhere

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8 years 6 months ago #514361 by Somewhere
The temperature was set up at 37.8 degree C for the first 18 days. It was running between 37.3 to 37.8 degree C. Fan has been running all the time. Thank you for your advise, I will give it a try.

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8 years 4 months ago #516229 by seatil

seatil wrote: I would probably use it again (if I don't build my own better incubator before then), but only if the RCom 20 is full and I'm unable to wait for it to become available. I'm tempted to use it as a hatcher rather than an incubator - therefore keeping chick down out of my expensive incubator's fans!


Appreciate that I'm probably necro-ing this thread here, but this info might be useful to someone reading it in the archives.

I've just finished a hatch of 12 duck eggs from the same source, but this time in my RCom 20. This time I got 100% hatch rate, albeit with a couple of ducklings assisted.

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8 years 4 months ago #516251 by Anakei
Well my broody hen hatched 10 out of 10 eggs and didn't require any electricity to run :P

But seriously, unless you are hatching large numbers eggs, I would go with a broody hen any time. Its no trouble at all
I would consider an incubator for duck eggs, as I was put off trying to use a broody hen to hatch duck eggs due to the long time required to hatch.,
Hmm. I seem to have contradicted myself :lol:

Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

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8 years 4 months ago #516254 by Stikkibeek
Some of you may be aware that I had been having trouble with some of my chicks developing perosis like symptoms from about two weeks of age. I had three things that were likely causes. 1. Environment. 2. Incubation, or 3. hereditary factors.
Soil tests showed a lack of manganese in our soil which made me think it was environmental.
However, after feeding a tonic to the breeding hens, I still got some chick with crooked toes. These were brooder raised chicks. I had tried changing the material underfoot for them to see if that made a difference, but it didn't. The last two lots of chicks I have hatched in the incubators I grafted under some clucky hens. So far, the oldest are 5 weeks and the youngest two weeks, and no sign of perosis yet.
Unfortunately by changing two things in the scientific experiment, I have made it impossible to tell what factor has kept the chickens safe :whistle: My last hatch for the season may not be lucky enough for a foster mother, (due in 10 days) so we'll have to wait and see what develops.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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