Egg incubator - made in China

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8 years 7 months ago #512634 by Somewhere

Anakei;519552 wrote: Oops posted that by mistake!
Thanks for the report - it certainly looks like the cheap incubator is more hassle than its worth, though perhaps for someone like me who only wants a few birds at a time it might still be a viable option. Still, losses of over 50% is rather disheartening, and expensive if you are buying the eggs.....
I think I'll still go with the broody option for now :)

I will let my broody hen sit on eggs, normally give her second chance if it doesn't go well on the first time. But I really wish that I had an incubator when one of them stopped sitting at day 21 and left all unhatched eggs behind. I did not think of using electric blanket. I would use it if I knew at the time.[:0]

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8 years 7 months ago #512709 by HarryPotter
My two cents worth.... You get what you pay for and having tried a cheap model once I decided I would never put myself and some of the chick's through the pain again. I had great pleasure in firstly destroying the cheap machine and secondly saving up for my brinsea.
You cannot beat research either and there are some wonderful papers online. One such paper is now my go to document. I'll see if I can find it and post a link.

Sharing the pad with Harry the Australian Terrorist, Penny the Bearded Collie, Bev the Schnauzer/beardie and her daughters Nellie and Charlotte. (Dad was a Hungarian Vizsla) + lots of chooks. [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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8 years 7 months ago #512742 by Somewhere

HarryPotter;519734 wrote: My two cents worth.... You get what you pay for and having tried a cheap model once I decided I would never put myself and some of the chick's through the pain again. I had great pleasure in firstly destroying the cheap machine and secondly saving up for my brinsea.
You cannot beat research either and there are some wonderful papers online. One such paper is now my go to document. I'll see if I can find it and post a link.

I do not like to buy anything just because it is cheap and want to find a product which is value for money. I went directly to the manufacturer in China this time and asked for their latest model. It may still be not as good as brinsea, but it is better than the models they made a few years ago.

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8 years 7 months ago #512744 by Stikkibeek
I've had mixed success with my Black Chick incubator, but better success incubating dry. Our relative humidity up here can be about 75% anyway at this time of the year and sometimes higher. The Black chick has good ventilation holes which suck in lots of damp air. I mostly use it now for brooding for the first 24 hours once the chicks hatch from the Italian incubator I have which seems pretty good. One of the things I don't like about a lot of incubators, is that when you stop turning and leave to hatch from day 18, the first chicks out roll the unhatched eggs around so much and I'm fairly certain that is detrimental to chicks that are trying to pip. Doesn't happen under a hen.
Had one chick stop after pipping recently and I helped it out after 36 hours of no mobility. I discovered that although it had absorbed the yolk sac, it had a lot of it's rear end external and spent most of its time on its back and prostrate with legs stretched straight out.. I thought it would probably snuff it, but after 48 hours, and a teaspoon of manuka honeyed water, it has perked up, its rear end has closed and it is eating and now looking pretty bright.
I suppose it will be a rooster.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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8 years 7 months ago #512784 by Inger
Replied by Inger on topic Egg incubator - made in China
If you have a look at my posting about hatching duck eggs, you'll see that we have an Ely-1 Chinese incubator. It's the smallest model that company makes and fits 80 small eggs.

Using the method I describe in my post, I hatched 23 ducklings from 24 eggs. Though the norm in past years was 15 out of 21 eggs or there abouts, depending on the type of food fed to the adults leading up to collecting eggs for incubation.

On ordinary laying pellets, I would get 6 ducklings from 2 dozen eggs. Rather dismal.

45 hectares between Whangarei and Paparoa. Registered Dexter cattle, Wiltshire sheep - black, white & pied.
New Hampshire Red poultry & Dorking poultry. Pilgrim Geese, Appleyard Ducks.
A cat called Pusscat and still looking for another heading dog.

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8 years 6 months ago #512897 by Somewhere

Inger;519818 wrote: If you have a look at my posting about hatching duck eggs, you'll see that we have an Ely-1 Chinese incubator. It's the smallest model that company makes and fits 80 small eggs.

Using the method I describe in my post, I hatched 23 ducklings from 24 eggs. Though the norm in past years was 15 out of 21 eggs or there abouts, depending on the type of food fed to the adults leading up to collecting eggs for incubation.

On ordinary laying pellets, I would get 6 ducklings from 2 dozen eggs. Rather dismal.


I have read your posting. Congrats on your success rates. I feed my chickens super chook. I tried other brands of chicken pallets but they do not like any of them.

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8 years 6 months ago #512898 by Somewhere

Stikkibeek;519775 wrote: I've had mixed success with my Black Chick incubator, but better success incubating dry. Our relative humidity up here can be about 75% anyway at this time of the year and sometimes higher. The Black chick has good ventilation holes which suck in lots of damp air. I mostly use it now for brooding for the first 24 hours once the chicks hatch from the Italian incubator I have which seems pretty good. One of the things I don't like about a lot of incubators, is that when you stop turning and leave to hatch from day 18, the first chicks out roll the unhatched eggs around so much and I'm fairly certain that is detrimental to chicks that are trying to pip. Doesn't happen under a hen.
Had one chick stop after pipping recently and I helped it out after 36 hours of no mobility. I discovered that although it had absorbed the yolk sac, it had a lot of it's rear end external and spent most of its time on its back and prostrate with legs stretched straight out.. I thought it would probably snuff it, but after 48 hours, and a teaspoon of manuka honeyed water, it has perked up, its rear end has closed and it is eating and now looking pretty bright.
I suppose it will be a rooster.

What area do you live? I am in Auckland. The humidity here is about 60% these days.

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8 years 6 months ago #512902 by Somewhere
I received my incubator 3 days ago. It has been running since. Auto turning is fine. Temperature on display is between 37 °c to 38°c but mainly around 37.5°c. I do not need to do anything to these two. I was not too sure about the humidity to start with. I did not put any water in it at start so it went under 45% and begin to beep. I was in a bit panic even there is no egg in it so put a bit too much water and it goes up to 65%. I now understand better about this machine. If humidity gets low, adding a bit of water 20 to 30ml at a time and let it settle for a while. If the humidity is a bit high, I will open sealed hole on the side.I may still need to add a small amount of water once or twice a day. It works for me so far. I plan to put eggs in this weekend and stay at home for the last three days of hatching.

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8 years 6 months ago #512912 by Stikkibeek

Somewhere;519952 wrote: What area do you live? I am in Auckland. The humidity here is about 60% these days.

There will be a variation in humidity in accordance with indoor/outdoor.

Shelly park weather [URL] www.shellypark.co.nz/?q=node/33 [/URL] which is the best weather station closes to where we live, is currently reading 76%. My dehumidifier in this room is currently on 69%. So, well high enough for hen eggs until they begin to hatch.
In February when you pass that centre point between the longest day and the shortest day, which is in fact the Autumnal equinox, is about the time that late ripening peaches will go overnight with brown rot. Humidity is generally the catalyst for brown rot to flourish.

hence the reason I dry hatch with much better results. Nothing quite so disheartening as to find a chick fully developed that failed to pip because it was still too wet within the shell.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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8 years 6 months ago #512913 by Stikkibeek

[hr] I received my incubator 3 days ago. It has been running since. Auto turning is fine. Temperature on display is between 37 ?c to 38?c but mainly around 37.5?c. I do not need to do anything to these two. I was not too sure about the humidity to start with. I did not put any water in it at start so it went under 45% and begin to beep. I was in a bit panic even there is no egg in it so put a bit too much water and it goes up to 65%. I now understand better about this machine. If humidity gets low, adding a bit of water 20 to 30ml at a time and let it settle for a while. If the humidity is a bit high, I will open sealed hole on the side.I may still need to add a small amount of water once or twice a day. It works for me so far. I plan to put eggs in this weekend and stay at home for the last three days of hatching.

I run my Italian incubator at 37.7 until day 18, when I lower it to 37.3

My Black chick incubator has two air portals which I leave open as they machine sucks air in from the surrounding room the hygrometer usually stays at about 58%. On day 18, I close the holes and add a little water to lift the humidity above 70%

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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8 years 6 months ago #512923 by Somewhere

Stikkibeek;519968 wrote: There will be a variation in humidity in accordance with indoor/outdoor.

Shelly park weather [URL] www.shellypark.co.nz/?q=node/33 [/URL] which is the best weather station closes to where we live, is currently reading 76%. My dehumidifier in this room is currently on 69%. So, well high enough for hen eggs until they begin to hatch.
In February when you pass that centre point between the longest day and the shortest day, which is in fact the Autumnal equinox, is about the time that late ripening peaches will go overnight with brown rot. Humidity is generally the catalyst for brown rot to flourish.

hence the reason I dry hatch with much better results. Nothing quite so disheartening as to find a chick fully developed that failed to pip because it was still too wet within the shell.

I have found humidity near our area at here,
[url] www.weather-display.com/windy/gb/grahamsbeach.htm [/url]
It is 69% currently . The manufacturer suggests first 18 days at 55% and 60 to 65% for the last 3 days.
Your incubator does alright at dry hatching.
When I took out my hygrometer this morning, it was around 60%. But it is only 46% at the moment. I may have problems if I try dry hatching.

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8 years 6 months ago #512926 by HarryPotter
It will be a time of trial and error for you Somewhere as it was for most of us. Before I took the plunge and started to dry hatch chicken eggs a few years ago I battled with humidity, sticky chicks which were at times, weak or dead. Auckland at this time if year is great for incubating eggs if you are using the dry hatching technique. I admit it takes a leap of faith because it goes against manufacturer instructions. However it is a personal choice and it will be exciting for you to get started.

Sharing the pad with Harry the Australian Terrorist, Penny the Bearded Collie, Bev the Schnauzer/beardie and her daughters Nellie and Charlotte. (Dad was a Hungarian Vizsla) + lots of chooks. [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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8 years 6 months ago #513010 by Somewhere

Stikkibeek;519969 wrote: I run my Italian incubator at 37.7 until day 18, when I lower it to 37.3

My Black chick incubator has two air portals which I leave open as they machine sucks air in from the surrounding room the hygrometer usually stays at about 58%. On day 18, I close the holes and add a little water to lift the humidity above 70%

Thank you for letting me know the temperature setting. The factory default setting is a bit higher so I have now reduced it.

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8 years 6 months ago #513011 by Somewhere

HarryPotter;519984 wrote: It will be a time of trial and error for you Somewhere as it was for most of us. Before I took the plunge and started to dry hatch chicken eggs a few years ago I battled with humidity, sticky chicks which were at times, weak or dead. Auckland at this time if year is great for incubating eggs if you are using the dry hatching technique. I admit it takes a leap of faith because it goes against manufacturer instructions. However it is a personal choice and it will be exciting for you to get started.

This incubator runs at 60% to 65% humidity during the day. The humidity drops at night and only shows 50% the next morning. I have not added any more water since I read about dry hatching yesterday. I am now a lot more relaxed about the humidity after reading your post.

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8 years 6 months ago #513073 by Somewhere
Eggs are in. Humidity is around 50% to 55%. It gets more stable after I moved it into a room has the most stable temperature in the house. Temperature in the incubator is between 37.3°c to 37.8°C. The little bottle came with the machine is quite useful. If I want to get rid of extra water from the incubator, I will open the incubator cover a little, put the long tip into water and suck some water out. I have read about dry incubation but has decided not to do it this time. There is not very much water in the incubator at the moment. I will let humidity runs from 45% to 55% instead of original 50% to 60% for the first 18 days. I am thinking about not to add any more water untill 18th day , but have not decided yet.

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