Cattle Home Kill

More
9 years 3 months ago #501580 by WillEyre
Replied by WillEyre on topic Cattle Home Kill

katieb;507457 wrote: Schnitzel is one of the first things to go here...cooked as schnitzel/used for stirfries/ cooked / for wraps which we then toast in the george forman or sandwich press.

The only roasts we get are the rolled ones, we get topside & bolar roasts made into what ever else is suitable....BBQ steak, schnitzel etc. We only get a couple of bags of stewing steak & maybe 1 corned silverside

When it comes to beef schnitzel I heartily agree. There's never enough of it in my opinion.
(Not that I do the cooking), but I would've thought that the schnitzel was one of the very easiest cuts to cook. Once it is egged and crumbed it's very much like cooking a rasher of bacon, isn't it? Takes ten minutes, tops.
In my opinion it is also a much better use of the cut than as roasts for the reason that it is very easy to waste a roast gone cold because of its tendency to dry out quickly. With schnitzel nothing is wasted.

I liked Occam's Razor so much, I bought the company.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 3 months ago #501581 by Snarg
Replied by Snarg on topic Cattle Home Kill
Well, the chickens are cleaning the head for us. They also have the lungs and a few other bits and bobs.

We dehydrated the liver (13 pounds!) into puppy snacks. The wife found a recipe for stuffed heart but I have refused to eat that. Instead, she is going to make jerky out of it. If it sucks then the dogs get more treats.

We also kept the bottom part of the legs. My wife wants to practice clipping the claws on something that is not going to kick the crap out of her.

We are going to go in on Monday to get a chunk of meat off of him. We'll cook it up at home and see how it tastes. That will determine what cuts, if any, we will get.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 3 months ago #501583 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Cattle Home Kill
I find that with almost all meats that it tastes better after it has been frozen. I guess that has happened because I have had so much frozen meat, and so little meat that has only been chilled, over my lifetime. Thus I don't test the meat until after it has been frozen, except for the tail.
I've eaten many bulls, and the only minor problem that I have is that there is less fat so a bit less flavour, and the less fat means that there is less lubrication when eating, so it is a bit firmer.
Beef sausages are good, depending on the butcher and his recipe, but with bull he may have to use a bit of pork fat, unless your bull was fat.
The flavour of the curing also depends on the butcher, and whether he is able to inject the brine into the meat.
I have been told that if beef liver is roasted whole within a couple of hours of slaughter then it tastes very similar to very tender roast beef, rather than liver. I have also heard of it being boiled then sliced thinly to use in sandwiches rather than liver sausage. But we have lots of dogs, so all the offal (lungs, heart, liver, pancreas) and the cheeks gets cut up and boiled up for the dogs. And the penis and testicles ....

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 3 months ago #501584 by Kiwi303
Replied by Kiwi303 on topic Cattle Home Kill
I like beef heart, I just bung it in the slow cooker and use it for sandwiches with a spicy piccalilli or hot sauce.

You Live and Learn, or you don't Live Long -anon

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 3 months ago #501622 by WillEyre
Replied by WillEyre on topic Cattle Home Kill

LongRidge;507486 wrote: I find that with almost all meats that it tastes better after it has been frozen. I guess that has happened because I have had so much frozen meat, and so little meat that has only been chilled, over my lifetime. Thus I don't test the meat until after it has been frozen, except for the tail.

The reason for the beef to taste better after being frozen than it does 'fresh' is that you are not hanging it for anywhere near long enough in the chiller.
If you're comparing frozen beef to the meat off the same animal that's fresh, and only four days 'old', then the frozen sample probably will be slightly better - though it's marginal.
It's only likely a little better, after freezing (and thawing), because it's just that little bit older/riper. And, if you left that thawed meat for a few more days in the fridge it will have improved even more.
(In a previous posting you indicated that four days in the chiller was your butcher's preference. Most people in the trade would say that this is by no means long enough. At least double this time would be far better. I would imagine that the butcher's only rushing it out to you in four days because chilling isn't cheap and he can free-up the chiller in about a third of the time that would represent the ideal.)
Overseas (notably for the high-end restaurant trade) beef is frequently 'aged' for twenty, and up to thirty days. Sometimes even longer.
This is done for a very good reason (though the diner pays through the nose for it); it guarantees the product will be tenderer and more flavoursome than something that's been quick-frozen after just a few days on the hook.


I liked Occam's Razor so much, I bought the company.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 2 months ago #501654 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Cattle Home Kill
Will, no. 4 days in the chiller is my preference, possibly because I've got used to meat that has not been hung for very long, as supermarket meat is not any longer. Because of that, the flavours that develop with longer hanging are unusual, to me and us. When my butcher does one half one day and the rest the next day, the shorter hung one never tastes worse than the longer hung one, and sometimes the extra days hanging is "worse".

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 2 months ago #501721 by X-Toma
Replied by X-Toma on topic Cattle Home Kill
Our 23 month old Highland Bull came in at 165 kg on the hook. Half of what Snarg's bull came in at [:0]

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 2 months ago #501734 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Cattle Home Kill
That sounds much more correct, for NZ sized Highlands which seem to have been kept fairly small, to keep them looking cute for longer.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 2 months ago #501736 by Snarg
Replied by Snarg on topic Cattle Home Kill
Went to the butcher today and got about two pounds of rib steak off of him. We wanted to have a taste before we decided what cuts to get. If the taste was garbage, then I guess we would have a lot of hamburger :)

I am happy to report that he is delicious! However, rib steak is a bit tougher than I anticipated. Note to self: Marinade, marinade, marinade.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 2 months ago #501738 by katieb
Replied by katieb on topic Cattle Home Kill

Snarg;507654 wrote:
I am happy to report that he is delicious! However, rib steak is a bit tougher than I anticipated. Note to self: Marinade, marinade, marinade.


how did you cook it?(how pink was it?)

Animals rule our place... cows, calves, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, donkeys, chickens, ducks... the list goes on
...."lifestyle block like" 25 or so acres around the house attached to a rather large farm with dairy drystock & a 600 cow dairy conversion :)....1500 acres to call home

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 2 months ago #501754 by Snarg
Replied by Snarg on topic Cattle Home Kill

katieb;507657 wrote: how did you cook it?(how pink was it?)

I seared it in a frying pan and then moved it into the oven.

I didn't marinade it at all before cooking, just used a dry rub. I probably cooked it for just a little bit too long, but it really could have benefited from a bit of tenderizing.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 2 months ago #501757 by katieb
Replied by katieb on topic Cattle Home Kill
was it pink in the middle at all?

Can I ask why you used something to flavour it when you wanted to see what the flavour was like?

Animals rule our place... cows, calves, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, donkeys, chickens, ducks... the list goes on
...."lifestyle block like" 25 or so acres around the house attached to a rather large farm with dairy drystock & a 600 cow dairy conversion :)....1500 acres to call home

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 2 months ago #501770 by MurrayR
Replied by MurrayR on topic Cattle Home Kill
We filled our freezer yesterday with packaged and frozen meat from a 2 year old Angus heifer. below are the details.
Shot between the eyes with a 22 from about 4m. Bled electrically
Live weight 500kg. Hook weight 287kg. Freezer weight 190kg.
Our return on live weight was 38%. This could have been higher as we only kept the heart and kidneys. No bones, liver or other odd bits.
Purchase price and killing charges were our only costs resulting in per kg value of $5.90.
We await the vultures in the family and would appreciate a number of recipes for the mountain of sausages and mince!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 2 months ago #501773 by katieb
Replied by katieb on topic Cattle Home Kill

MurrayR;507694 wrote:
We await the vultures in the family and would appreciate a number of recipes for the mountain of sausages and mince!


nachos, lasagne, sweet & sour sasuages, devilled sas

Animals rule our place... cows, calves, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, donkeys, chickens, ducks... the list goes on
...."lifestyle block like" 25 or so acres around the house attached to a rather large farm with dairy drystock & a 600 cow dairy conversion :)....1500 acres to call home

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
9 years 2 months ago #501777 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Cattle Home Kill
Murray, from that we would get about 20-25 kg of mince and the same of sausages.
Snarg, some more observations .....
1. The meat will get a bit more tender with a bit more hanging ..... if you can handle the flavour :-((
2. By "rib steak", I presume you do not mean "rib-eye, aka "scotch fillet". We get about 5.6% of the carcase of what our butcher calls "Barbeque flank". Depending on the animal, this has little fat, is the toughest of the frying steak and verges on a casseroling cut.
3. I don't know where this idea of searing steak came from, but for tender meat it is scientifically wrong. I was taught at university how and why meat proteins contract when they are overheated, which causes toughening. Thus, I cook steak very, very gently because I think the the burnt flavour of searing is less preferable to tenderness.
4. Searing will also tend to move the lubricating agents (the fat and the water) from out of the meat, thus toughening it.
5. Also, adding salt to raw meat, as you would with a marinade, causes toughening. Raw pineapple (I think) and raw kiwifruit (definitely) has a compound in it, a "protease" which breaks the protein into smaller bits, which does cause tenderisation .... but also a slightly different flavour. So a layer of kiwi or pineapple on your steak for 24 hours should tenderise it.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.146 seconds