chook/duck decapitator

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9 years 7 months ago #491983 by Del
Replied by Del on topic chook/duck decapitator
I second the broomstick method. I found it quick and simple. I think there's also something in 'distancing' yourself from the deed by using a broomstick and not actually chopping anything. It also means there's less mess, due to the blood draining into the neck cavity.
It's not just for the big boys either... I had some three week old cockerals that I had to dispose of - I had intended to break their necks manually, with them being so small and all, but couldn't bring myself to do it - using the broomstick method provided the distance (clean hands maybe?) to make it a bit more bearable.
I'm glad there's presently no cockerals on the property!

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9 years 7 months ago #491988 by Deanna
Replied by Deanna on topic chook/duck decapitator

Sue;496717 wrote:

But it shows how to hold the bird by the legs, breast facing your knees, pole across the back of the head, as close as it will go. Then step on the pole either side and pull firmly upwards-not jerk, until you feel the neck give as the pole presses between two vertebrae and breaks the spinal cord. If you pull too hard you will pull the head off, same result, but very bloody!
You can then hang the bird once it has stopped flapping, and let the blood drain into the neck cavity and be contained until you sever the head after plucking.

Thats the method I use Sue. I have a stick and its called 'The Death Stick". [:0] They don't flap for long usually.

Can you tell me, is it necessary to 'bleed' them?

25 acres, 1400 Blue Gums, Wiltshire sheep, 5 steers, 2 cows, ducks, chickens, bees, dog, cats, retired, 1 husband and 3 grandkids.

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9 years 7 months ago #491989 by Deanna
Replied by Deanna on topic chook/duck decapitator

stephclark;496723 wrote: OMG I now know where I went wrong.. oh I feel ghastly...I had the poor thing face up and broom across throat...eeekkk I feel terrible

You'll laugh about it one day! [;)] You won't be the 1st I'm sure, nor the last.
Rest assured, all will go well from now on. :D

25 acres, 1400 Blue Gums, Wiltshire sheep, 5 steers, 2 cows, ducks, chickens, bees, dog, cats, retired, 1 husband and 3 grandkids.

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9 years 7 months ago #492172 by wttmf
Replied by wttmf on topic chook/duck decapitator
Super sharp meat cleaver, one with a bit of weight. Missis holds the chook I take the head in one hand and lay it over block and one very swift chop and its over. We save the blood for making soup so hold the bird upside down as it kicks and bleeds into a bowl.

The cone method looks ok but meat cleaver and wooden chopping block work well.

I actually talk to them before I do it, thanking them for their sacrifice etc, but that just my way with all animals I kill, even wild game.

And we honor them by wasting nothing, feathers are composted, the down is saved and we use as filling, missis eats the feet (Chinese delicacy). If it cant be eaten it is used for something, worms compost whatever.

"Waste not want not"

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9 years 7 months ago #492182 by tonic
Replied by tonic on topic chook/duck decapitator
We usually chop as we have a plucking machine and theyare supposed to be bled before going in. I can't bring myself to kill sheep or chooks by cutting throats so thats out for us. I don't like having to hold them while they flap and spray blood, especially big cobb x roosters that are very strong! So we usually toss them under a bucket and hold it down...

Do they flap out of the cone or stay put? If they stay put it might bea better option.

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9 years 7 months ago #492191 by Andrea1
Replied by Andrea1 on topic chook/duck decapitator
95% of the time, they stay in the cone. The occasional one will pop out, but that's usually my fault for not putting him in properly. Last time we did 31, and 1 out of the lot popped out. Don't cut the cones till you test them for size. The thing I like about the cones the most is that most of the time, the roosters go very quiet and still.

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9 years 7 months ago #492192 by Andrea1
Replied by Andrea1 on topic chook/duck decapitator
Out of interest, tonic, where have you got replacement fingers for your plucker? Our plucker, which we've only had a couple of years, has had ALL the bottom row of fingers break off. Turns out the fingers are NOT solid rubber, they're some kind of composite, that don't stand up very well. I was going to buy a bag of 50 from amazon, as I think it's only $35USD for the bag, way cheaper than buying them individually, and they're the solid rubber ones.

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9 years 7 months ago #492303 by Maungamutu
Replied by Maungamutu on topic chook/duck decapitator
This thread kind of reminds me of "Game of thrones" last night :-0

Helped a friend slaughter a dozen of her ducks a few years back and remember that the job was much easier with two people, a nice flat chopping block and a sharp ex army heavy "bush knife" Deed done in under two minutes.

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9 years 7 months ago #492367 by Buttons
Replied by Buttons on topic chook/duck decapitator

Andrea;496742 wrote: My grandmother taught me to chop off heads and sharpen a hatchet when I was 8 years old. Hatchet and old stump. And she would take a bit of old rag and place it over the head and secure with a loose rubber band, not tight, just so it wouldn't slip off. Rooster went very quiet when she did that. She claims it was because the didn't like them looking at her when she did it!

Sounds like my grandmother, she was a complete pro and had them plucked in no time! My mum hated it because we'd come home with bits of the chicken like the insides and the heads and would insist on storing them in the fridge. Use to love getting the legs and pulling the tendons to make them move much to mums horror :D

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9 years 7 months ago #492396 by stephclark
Replied by stephclark on topic chook/duck decapitator

Buttons;497263 wrote: Sounds like my grandmother, she was a complete pro and had them plucked in no time! My mum hated it because we'd come home with bits of the chicken like the insides and the heads and would insist on storing them in the fridge. Use to love getting the legs and pulling the tendons to make them move much to mums horror :D


you are lucky your long suffering mum didn't have you adopted out! :D :D :p

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9 years 7 months ago #492409 by tonic
Replied by tonic on topic chook/duck decapitator

Andrea;497064 wrote: Out of interest, tonic, where have you got replacement fingers for your plucker? Our plucker, which we've only had a couple of years, has had ALL the bottom row of fingers break off. Turns out the fingers are NOT solid rubber, they're some kind of composite, that don't stand up very well. I was going to buy a bag of 50 from amazon, as I think it's only $35USD for the bag, way cheaper than buying them individually, and they're the solid rubber ones.

We just got cheap ones from TM and they are pretty rubbish! They break fairly easily and I am considering buying the better ones, but on TM tey are very expensive! Your Amazon option sounds much better.

Our plucker is only 80% effective. We think the speed isn't quite right and I know the fingers aren't doing as good a job as they could. If we put a couple of big cobb roosters in there it slows it down, so the speed/motor isn't quite what it should be. But thats how home made jobbies work here, firstly not quite right, till tweaked into working well.

I couldn't cope with plucking a dozen chooks but am happy to pick the odd feahters off them after they've been though the plucker, so its still work its weight in gold!

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9 years 7 months ago #492472 by Buttons
Replied by Buttons on topic chook/duck decapitator

stephclark;497293 wrote: you are lucky your long suffering mum didn't have you adopted out! :D :D :p

Haha I know, she's such a lovely mum :)

She use to hate pig butchering day too because she'd find things like the eyeballs or the snout stored by the cheese which we considered to be treasures but she certainly did not! :D :D

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9 years 7 months ago #492486 by Andrea1
Replied by Andrea1 on topic chook/duck decapitator
Thanks, tonic -- want to go halves on a couple of bags of the good rubber fingers from amazon (they have the best price I've been able to find - for the solid rubber ones, that is)? We can share the overseas postage?

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9 years 7 months ago #492490 by igor
Replied by igor on topic chook/duck decapitator
Buttons, why only save the eyes and the snout of the pig? We cook the whole head. The children think it's a bit special when it comes to the table with everything still on.

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9 years 7 months ago #492494 by stephclark
Replied by stephclark on topic chook/duck decapitator

Buttons;497377 wrote: Haha I know, she's such a lovely mum :)

She use to hate pig butchering day too because she'd find things like the eyeballs or the snout stored by the cheese which we considered to be treasures but she certainly did not! :D :D


haha.. I once worked for a commercial butchery outfit.. and my glass office looked out over 'pig alley'.. when the guys were breaking down the carcass's they thought it a huge joke to cellotape an eyeball to the outside of my office.. I would look up and see the thing staring back at me[}:)]..
they also played cricket with the kidneys.. messy!

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