Bee In My Bonnet

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9 years 10 months ago #490561 by kai
Replied by kai on topic Bee In My Bonnet
Where does having unproductive and stop and having intensively farmed land begin?

Surely it is personal choice as to which end of the continuum you chose to use your land? If the government suddenly decided you had to grow x amount of meat or potatoes from your lifestyle block else it was consficated, that would be ridiculous, just as ridiculous as an individual saying it.

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9 years 10 months ago #490576 by igor
Replied by igor on topic Bee In My Bonnet
You are dead right Ken. I believe that those who have a bit of land have a duty to do something with it. To me a ten acre lawn is just a waste of land that could be better used by someone else.

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9 years 10 months ago #490578 by Hawkspur
Replied by Hawkspur on topic Bee In My Bonnet
Is several pieces of unproductive land on the fringes of a city worse than the many lawns and floral beds within that city?
Is a bit of very intensively farmed land with downstream effects on the environment worse than totally unproductive conservation land?

Moderation is important, as is seeing things from others points of view.

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9 years 10 months ago #490582 by max2
Replied by max2 on topic Bee In My Bonnet
I don't agree with everything in this thread but its been a good thought provoking one.

there are a couple of things I would like to mention, firstly the bit about farmers being the first to split up productive farming land.

We live on a 16 ac title that was once part of my Hubby's family dairy farm and which we choose to buy back (at LSB prices) several years ago. We also own another 60 paper ac title at the rear of what was once the family farm.

My Father in law grew up in a farming family at Te Aroha and went off to war for New Zealand. When he returned the Govt offered some sort of farming grant/loan which he took up to buy the then unimproved 120 odd acres and with the help of clydesdales transformed the property into a working jersey dairy farm.

Another brother inherited the family farm who went on to sell it and start up in kiwi fruit down BOP.

My inlaws arrived here (Nth Waikato, West Coast) in the 1940's raising two children in the 1950's but still my FIL worked the farm solely with the family (in particular my hubby) and MIL raising the calves. By 1970's he had had enough of farming and like most of us, wanted to retire. The farm was sold as a going concern.

Subsequently two owners later the farm was subdivided into LSB's by an adjoining farmer by an approving council. Fortunately the rules have changed now.

When my in laws sold up, my Hubby was 14 and his sister 16. She had already left the family coup and my MIL was an Auckland Girl through and through. It would only be fair to return MIL to Auckland to be closer to her family and daughter.

My long winded point being is that farmers are also entitled to retire and relax like any employee expects to do after a long working life.

Not everyone in a family wants to farm. Whilst my Hubby still does not agree with my FIL's decision to sell, I think my FIL made the right choice as I truly believe my Hubby would be a very angry, resentful man if he hadn't been ''pushed'' back into the world when they moved. He needed to spend time away from the community and farming life however it seems that farming families can no longer make a decent living (he was paying cash for a new car every 2nd year) on the same size property and either need to expand or get out.

Also families are getting past the stage of just ''one'' child inheriting the family farm and fairness must be considered to all children when the division of an estate takes place. Thus another reason why family farms are sold.

Don't get me wrong at all KK, I get what you are saying and I really have to restrain myself when someone's paddock full of weeds gets praised on a faceb))k thread by people who have no idea what they are looking at apart from a rural view.

But I also need to remember someone sitting in a concrete flat surrounded by more flats/apartments is going to think a setting sun on a paddock of thistles (blowing my way) is delightful.... :rolleyes:

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9 years 10 months ago #490585 by Deanna
Replied by Deanna on topic Bee In My Bonnet
I have to wonder why the 1000 acre farm that is now all 25 acre LSBs of which one we live on was divided and sold. Must have been worth it for the farmer or he wouldn't have done it. :confused:

Anyway the sun is shining, the 80 chooks need tending to. The 30 sheep need checking, the bee hives need nudging, the tunnel house needs weeding so I'm out to enjoy the day. :D

But have to say, of the above post one type LSBs in here, I have never seen. :rolleyes:

25 acres, 1400 Blue Gums, Wiltshire sheep, 5 steers, 2 cows, ducks, chickens, bees, dog, cats, retired, 1 husband and 3 grandkids.

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9 years 10 months ago #490589 by max2
Replied by max2 on topic Bee In My Bonnet
OTT but related.....My other thing I wanted to say was all the recent media hype about how Auckland is running out of available housing for first home buyers.

I'm a bit over Aucklanders thinking and being treated like they are an island of their own. If the immigration figures are accurate, then those people should be directed to other parts of the country to reside, not Auckland.

First homes do not start at $500K ''if you are lucky to find one' that is 2nd home affordability.

They should step outside the latte bubble world that exists there and look further afield rather than call for more rural land to be subdivided to house them.

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9 years 10 months ago #490591 by kernels
Replied by kernels on topic Bee In My Bonnet

max2;495306 wrote: OTT but related.....My other thing I wanted to say was all the recent media hype about how Auckland is running out of available housing for first home buyers.

I'm a bit over Aucklanders thinking and being treated like they are an island of their own. If the immigration figures are accurate, then those people should be directed to other parts of the country to reside, not Auckland.

First homes do not start at $500K ''if you are lucky to find one' that is 2nd home affordability.

They should step outside the latte bubble world that exists there and look further afield rather than call for more rural land to be subdivided to house them.

There are 3 reasons immigrants end up in Auckland

1. Work
2. Jobs
3. Employment

Pretty much every industry in every small town is shutting down. Dairy may be booming, but how many people does it take to run a 1000 acre dairy farm ?

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9 years 10 months ago #490594 by Hawkspur
Replied by Hawkspur on topic Bee In My Bonnet

kernels;495308 wrote: There are 3 reasons immigrants end up in Auckland

1. Work
2. Jobs
3. Employment

Pretty much every industry in every small town is shutting down. Dairy may be booming, but how many people does it take to run a 1000 acre dairy farm ?

NZ isn't just Auckland and some small towns. There are other major centres really![;)]
Interestingly, in the last census, the only areas with little or no population growth were Manawatu/Wanganui and Gisborne. All other areas had a growth of 2% or more. The Nelson region (not known for a huge population) had very close to the same % growth as Auckland, just over 8%.

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9 years 10 months ago #490599 by keppelk
Replied by keppelk on topic Bee In My Bonnet

Hawkspur;495295 wrote: Moderation is important, as is seeing things from others points of view.

That's it in a nutshell. I've heard people wiser than myself say 'without difference there can be no average'. Everyone has their own ideas above what's right and wrong - productive and non-productive etc. All depends where each individual draws their own line-in-the-sand.

We have 4ha of native bush that is 'non productive'. Still the council is happy to contribute to fencing it off and allowing it to regenerate further. Despite not turning a profit it does have value (asthetic, habitat for natives, shades/cools pristine creek etc), though not everyone see it this way.

What would happen to the ride-on mower market if you could only buy machinery for productive usage? Even non-productive spending has economic impact.

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9 years 10 months ago #490604 by morioka
Replied by morioka on topic Bee In My Bonnet
At what point should people feel obliged to make land productive - some people can make a city backyard more productive than a lifestyle block, which can in turn be more productive than a traditional farm. It doesn't seem fair to point the finger at lifestyle block when there are acres of city backyards not being utilised as well as a number of large farms. Why should lifestyle blocks be so special or is it just because they are in your back yard KK?

Its interesting (as a slight side track) to go around Christchurch's eastern suburbs where there are now large tracts of empty land where suburbs once used to be - Cities and civilisation really aren't that permanent in the greater time scale of things.

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9 years 10 months ago #490610 by stephclark
Replied by stephclark on topic Bee In My Bonnet
what is productive?.. as asked earlier...

I look after my 10 acres, it is well fertilized and weed free.. I fully intend to leave my little patch of this earth in better heart than when I found it..
BUT.. it is my lifestyle patch, I have horses, vegs,a beastie or two and most of all complete sanity..

so in my opinion, my little patch is most productive.. it has kept me sound of mind and body..

when we move on, someone will come along and do their lifestyle thing.. be it storing cars or running free range chooks...that is their choice

i feel it realy judgemental to accuse LSBers of 'wasting' land.. so what if they want to watch grass grow?.. gosh one of my neighbours turned a nice 10 acre block into a golf course for himself.. it wasn't big noting, he just like whacking a ball around.. hes gone now and the new owners run cattle, sheep and chooks..

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9 years 10 months ago #490618 by rider1803
Replied by rider1803 on topic Bee In My Bonnet
Wow I cannot believe this post!
I am glad that I don't know the original poster, I definitely wouldn't fit his mould of a "lifestyle blocker", I own 5 acres where I run two horses (oh no not horses they are the worst!), and a couple of beefies for the freezer. I grew up on my parents farm, as did my husband, unfortunately due to a little thing called money we both have to go to work in town or the city, goodness me I am even a bank manager and my husband managers a company as well clearly we would have better knowledge of flying to the moon and definitely shouldn't be allowed outside the city boundary!
Personally I think what people want to do with their property is their business and unless they are negatively impacting on you perhaps you should crawl back under whatever rock you just came out from under and leave others alone.
No one knows everything and we all have to learn, that is the whole point of this forum, isn't it better to ask a question than just blindly stumble on?
I love nothing more than reading others trials and tribulations and the advice for animals etc (even the ones I don't own - who knew I would learn so much about sheep, ducks, goats, chickens & pigs!)

Confirmed horse addict.

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9 years 10 months ago #490619 by Kilmoon
Replied by Kilmoon on topic Bee In My Bonnet
So my thoughts of taking the lawnmower to one area of our back paddock that the sheep insist is not edible (no matter what fertiliser I put on it) wouldn't go down well then? It grows, they don't eat it, it continues growing, gets rank, they walk through it - you get the idea. Funnily enough another area near that one that I took the scrub cutter to several years ago (to do the same) is kept in good control by the sheep....once I got rid off the long rank bits.Fussy buggers that they are:rolleyes:. But in doing so I must be some sort of southern JAFFA!![:0][:0]

Fun thread...make you think about the term 'productive'.

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9 years 10 months ago #490632 by kindajojo
Replied by kindajojo on topic Bee In My Bonnet
Then we could just put it all into perspective...population density means we all have about 40 sq miles each ......I don't think the next door neighbour having a couple of acres more than I do and not using it the way I want them too is cause for "size envy" or really a big deal.
Ok so it's not all 'productive' but there is a lot with a lot of potential that hasn't even been touched ...... I think at the moment there is plenty to go round.

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9 years 10 months ago #490634 by Curious George
Replied by Curious George on topic Bee In My Bonnet

rider1803;495336 wrote: ...I grew up on my parents farm, as did my husband...

:D :D :D

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