Intereseting few days with a 4 month calf with neurological abnormality

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10 years 3 months ago #480975 by Ruth
What happens in the rumen to cause the problem and if it occurs, how long until it can rectify itself? If they're so sensitive to possible changes within a pasture they usually graze, I think I'm going to give up on cattle and take up painting.

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10 years 3 months ago #481011 by cowvet

Ruth;484673 wrote: What happens in the rumen to cause the problem and if it occurs, how long until it can rectify itself? If they're so sensitive to possible changes within a pasture they usually graze, I think I'm going to give up on cattle and take up painting.

The bugs in the rumen get out of kilter. Some manufacture B1 and others produce thiaminases (enzymes that break down thiamine). From what I understand the more common problem is a proliferation of the enzymes that break down thiamine and hence lead to a deficiency.


I love animals...they're delicious

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10 years 3 months ago #481021 by Ruth

cowvet;484715 wrote: The bugs in the rumen get out of kilter. Some manufacture B1 and others produce thiaminases (enzymes that break down thiamine). From what I understand the more common problem is a proliferation of the enzymes that break down thiamine and hence lead to a deficiency.

Thank you. I've had a one-off problem here which could be Thiamine related, but may equally likely be an idiopathic epileptic seizure, bearing in mind a chequered family history. I am not sure that it's not my subsequent nervousness which is seeing other slight, possible indicators of a problem in the others. Nothing more than a tiny bit more jumpiness in a couple of the same contemporary group. I also have the heifer who can't walk properly, whose problem appears to be neurological. Putting those things together has made me wonder what, in their normal diets, could have sparked problems, if they are even related?

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10 years 3 months ago #481028 by cowvet

Ruth;484726 wrote: Thank you. I've had a one-off problem here which could be Thiamine related, but may equally likely be an idiopathic epileptic seizure, bearing in mind a chequered family history. I am not sure that it's not my subsequent nervousness which is seeing other slight, possible indicators of a problem in the others. Nothing more than a tiny bit more jumpiness in a couple of the same contemporary group. I also have the heifer who can't walk properly, whose problem appears to be neurological. Putting those things together has made me wonder what, in their normal diets, could have sparked problems, if they are even related?


B1 deficiency is rapidly progressive to convulsions and death. From first signs to convulsing/coma/dead would be approx 48-72 hours at a stab. we would see 95% of our cases in weaned ruminants and its usually occurs about December to March. Most recover...the ones that don't are the ones that are picked up too late so we recommended checking young stock daily.


I love animals...they're delicious

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10 years 3 months ago #481035 by Ruth
My heifer was absolutely fine beforehand (last check 11pm) and started seizing at 8am. She had an interesting (mild) probable earlier attack 20 days earlier. I suspect hormonal involvement in her susceptibility to whatever went wrong in her brain. She was a stunner, physically. I was too ripped up about it to post here at the time.

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