Shipping container for storage - hire or buy?

More
10 years 6 months ago #36315 by reggit
....anyone done this? Pros and cons of buying or hiring?

And any idea if a permit from council needed for one of these on your site?

:)

Take a break...while I take care of your home, your block, your pets, your stock! [;)] PM me...

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474016 by Stikkibeek
I don't think you need a permit as they are not classed as permanent buildings. They are fairly cost effective and there are some companies that turn them into offices, all lined and with windows. They can also be used for garden sheds. Our neighbour has quite a few used for storage, but he bought his.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474023 by Hawkspur
In practice, most Councils do turn a blind eye to storage containers, but if it bothers a neighbour, and doesn't meet the requirements of exemption under Schedule 1 of the Building Act, you may be asked to go through the consent process.
The Schedule of exempt buildings is here:
www.dbh.govt.nz/bc-no-consent-schedule-1

Technically, whether or not a permit is required for a shipping container depends on where it is on your property, how big it is, what it is there for, and how long it is going to be there.
If the purpose of the container has a time limit, such as storage for the during a construction period, then consent is not likely to be required.
If it isn't for a set period and purpose, the time frame may depend on your Council rules. In Christchurch, more than a month is considered permanent under the rules, but I have only heard of this being invoked where the rules were flouted or a neighbour complained.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474024 by reggit
Thanks. I also have a feeling the rules differ from hiring a container (or for sleepouts etc) compared to buying one...up here, sleepouts at least aren't an issue as long as they are not permanently sited and are hired rather than owned...as that I suppose indicates it's temporary...

Take a break...while I take care of your home, your block, your pets, your stock! [;)] PM me...

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474027 by MooandPop
I had one onsite when I did our reno, Just hired it. Was brilliant! Dry place to store materials, furniture and to work in if it raining. Would do again in a flash!!!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474043 by max2
We bought one in Aussie and still have it on site storing some of our stuff as well as the land owners. Relatively cheap at the time as once they have done so many miles, they are no longer able to continue to be used on the ships.

Just watch who the sellers are.... there are heaps of containers out there looking for new homes. As the potential buyer, you are in the box seat.

OTT Interestingly I learnt from when we were moving from aussie to rural NZ, that the shipping container our household stuff was packed in would have to be re-packaged in Auckland as 'MAF don't allow o/s shipping containers to move within rural NZ.... (just a little known fact for the offering).

Personally I would buy one, its always yours. Those cabin rooms no bigger than the end of a shipping container start at rental of $65 per week up our end of the map.

And, also at our end of the map, a local chap had two containers that he put roofing trusses over to create an enclosed space between the two containers. As it was virtually on the road, he was made to pull it down, but the containers remain.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474049 by Del
My view is it's a temporary structure as it's readily relocatable. Depending on your location though, I'd agree you don't want an eyesore for neighbours - careful placement and/or some planting will help: Best to avoid incurring the attention of council...
Ours doubles for storage and a garage for the ride on. I think it's great, it holds heaps, and when you consider the size and Rock solid construction, significantly better value than other options for that purpose. So unless you're one of these admirable tidy people who never hoards "for when that thing may one day be incredibly useful" I'd buy... You can never have too much storage! :D

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474059 by RhodeRed
Procurement wise there are several different outfits selling them on Trademe in various conditions.

Had a bit to do with international freight and shipping containers before.

If you are going to make it permanent you may want to consider putting some kind of carport-style roof over the top as the tops aren't that substantial and certainly aren't load bearing, they can sag, pool water and start rusting out.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474090 by Cigar
Our neighbours have one. It's alongside their shed and painted the same colour - you wouldn't even notice it's a container it blends in so well (took me a while anyway!).

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474109 by Kiwi303
we have one down here, shipped a whole bunch from the Kawhia farm to this farm in it and it stored a lot of the overflow from various places tat aren't needed immediately

I would buy.

You Live and Learn, or you don't Live Long -anon

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474115 by Hawkspur
What to look for in a shipping container:
Check the hinges are straight, and the catches easy to operate.
Check the door seals are intact and undamaged.
Check the roof still has the very slight curve that means it will drain water off it. Check that any dings (which will make it cheaper) are not penetrations, especially on the top, where any water pooling will rust through.
Check the floor for rot, splits or breaks, smells from spills.
Get a metal box added that gets in the way of anyone cutting through a padlock on the door.

A white painted interior is much easier to find things in.[;)]

Any paint used should be checked for compatibility with the Cor-Ten steel containers are made from. It rusts on the surface, but doesn't flake away as much as standard steel alloys.

Don't sit them directly on the ground for any length of time. The base will rust and the floor rot without enough ventilation. Blocks under each corner giving 150mm airspace will be sufficient except in really damp spots.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474122 by igor
Definiely buy your container then you can do what you like with it. Companies such as Shelter Station make tent like structures designed to span between two containers for added usefulness.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474142 by Belle Bosse
Buy. Not that expensive and very handy! Sure beats a leaky tent to camp in!

Best you can get are the near new containers or ones that have only done one trip. They are reasonably hard to obtain.
Also in top position are the Premium Grade which are fully reconditioned containers.
A link to be able to see what grades are available... from a contact we are happy with and return to...
www.unitedcontainers.co.nz/grades-dimensions/

Also the FAQ are worth reading.

Lol... Check the container you are getting was not off the "Rena".

Dark coloured containers (red, dark green, dark blue) really absorb the heat and can quickly reach the high 30C to 40C inside even with the doors open. We have painted our container's exterior light grey as they gain some heat which helps them stay dry but are not so dark they get too hot. White paint keeps them cooler than grey, but they also tend to stay a bit damp inside.

Long term storage: its best to install a whirly bird vent in the roof to help remove heat or moisture. The container at my parents' place in QLD has a whirly bird to remove the heat even though it has been painted white as well. Their temperature range can hit 50C in summer.

Its not advised to keep machinery long term in closed shipping containers as the machinery will tend to start rusting.

The "lock boxes" are great for protecting your padlocks. The padlock can also be flipped out of sight by turning it upside down within the lock box.

The size: again depending on what you want it for. The 20 foot container has reasonable good lighting at the rear with one door open. The 40 footer gets a bit dark towards the back with one door open.

Keeping the container off the ground is important as the floors are made of ply type timber. Air flow is important for the timber. Our containers are about 30 cm off the ground. It also means pets have a dry place to hide when it is raining or hailing.

Swaggie, thanks for that tip re MAF and overseas container movements. Will have to keep that in mind for when I finally ship my gear across from Australia. I can understand MAF's desire not to have uninvited hitch-hikers spreading across rural NZ. That would be a disaster!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474198 by Clods
Hiring - my dad has been hiring one, and it costs $100 a month. As its been here for several years, it would have been more cost effective to buy one and sell it later.

2 horses, 15 Chickens, 1 goat, 2 pigs, 1 cat

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 6 months ago #474199 by max2
Another OTT used shipping containers with their doors removed apparently also make good bedding for bridges in small creeks as long as they put into the area securely to deal with any mass flooding in winter.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.147 seconds