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11 years 10 months ago #32086 by wiltshire
its all on was created by wiltshire
Our ewes have started lambing with 3 sets of twins and one single who had twins! and about 20 others about to burst and that was just today.
may be in for a busy time i think

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11 years 10 months ago #429116 by Ruth
Replied by Ruth on topic its all on
Why in the middle of winter, if that's not a rude question?

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11 years 10 months ago #429118 by Stu_R
Replied by Stu_R on topic its all on
Its all about getting them up to weight and away on trucks when price is at its best Ruth :)
My own ones will start from 25 july onwards i think .. Biggles went in 25 feb .. a bit later than 17 and beefy and the boys at Wiltshire's

5 retired Greyhounds ( Bridgette , Lilly, GoGo,Sam and now Lenny) 15 friendly sheep all of whom are named and come when you call them :) , 2 goats, Mollie and Eee Bee :
Olive trees , .. old bugger doing the best he can with no money or land :)

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11 years 10 months ago #429121 by wiltshire
Replied by wiltshire on topic its all on
yes thats right Stu but also when the worse weather arrives our lambs are older and can handle the conditions better .

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11 years 10 months ago #429122 by Ruth
Replied by Ruth on topic its all on
Because I'm feeling contrary, I shall ask why market demands trump animal welfare? It is a question I ask every year, in all livestock markets. I can see that in some parts of the country, the only way to have small animals fed through a whole lactation is to have them born early enough that their mothers don't run out of feed because of dry summers, but anywhere else, the primary driver seems to be market forces.

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11 years 10 months ago #429124 by Ruth
Replied by Ruth on topic its all on

wiltshire;427287 wrote: Our ewes have started lambing with 3 sets of twins and one single who had twins! and about 20 others about to burst and that was just today.
may be in for a busy time i think

Good when they all come together though! How many ewes have you altogether?

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11 years 10 months ago #429125 by Stu_R
Replied by Stu_R on topic its all on
also though ... as wiltshire says .. round here the worst weather is still to come big time , and his lambs will be older and able to handle it better :) .. they also have feed out there :)
I only have 12 ewes lambing this year , and i have taken a gamble on putting my boy in so lambs hopefully fall in the usually not bad patch of weather round beginning of August .. it has worked perfectly for the last 3 lambings since i have had sheep
The market is of no matter to me ... as i don't have enough to worry about it .. this year ( after getting screwed selling small pens at sale yards :( ) i am more intrested in taking Friendly semi tame ewe lambs in small lots up to the Small Holders Auctions up the valley in January , as Lifestylers go up there and don't want pens of 20 or 30 sheep .. so i will spend time with all mine and have them people friendly .. lol as all my sheep are anyway :)

5 retired Greyhounds ( Bridgette , Lilly, GoGo,Sam and now Lenny) 15 friendly sheep all of whom are named and come when you call them :) , 2 goats, Mollie and Eee Bee :
Olive trees , .. old bugger doing the best he can with no money or land :)

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11 years 10 months ago #429128 by Ruth
Replied by Ruth on topic its all on
If there's feed and shelter - and sorry Wiltshire, your reply appeared while I was writing mine - and I see your point re getting them big enough to cope. I guess the same applies to autumn calving. Where the consideration is only commercial though, I have real qualms.

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11 years 10 months ago #429131 by wiltshire
Replied by wiltshire on topic its all on
we have 131 to lamb this year

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11 years 10 months ago #429134 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic its all on
Ruth, down here, often June and July have calm and clear weather. No wind and little or no rain means that they keep warmer, even if they are in a frost. The major problem with early lambing is that the grass stops growing in early May and doesn't start again until mid August, so if there is not an autumn flush of grass growth the sheep can starve, especially if they are Romneys and won't eat hay. Down here, August weather is often cold, wet and windy and stays that way until after the spring equinox on Sept 22. Thus, if the grass would be most nutritious in October, then would be best time to lamb. But the spring flush starts mid August and is over by late September, and by mid October the grass has gone rank. We lamb from about 7 August until about 2 October, and the early lambs are almost always faster growing and more healthy than the late ones. Most of this difference is because the grass for both the early lambs and their mothers is so much more nutritious.

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11 years 10 months ago #429135 by Stikkibeek
Replied by Stikkibeek on topic its all on

Ruth;427302 wrote: If there's feed and shelter - and sorry Wiltshire, your reply appeared while I was writing mine - and I see your point re getting them big enough to cope. I guess the same applies to autumn calving. Where the consideration is only commercial though, I have real qualms.


We calve some of our herd, in Autumn, not for commercial purposes, but to account for the later tax cut off, so that weaners fall into the following year and to spread the payouts. Autumn pasture is also a consideration in country that is prone to drying out in summer.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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11 years 10 months ago #429137 by muri
Replied by muri on topic its all on
Our grass is growing like crazy at the moment and I am hard pressed to keep up with the new growth.
Our spring grass here doesnt really come through properly until sept sometimes oct but July /august are are worst weather months
But I would say that your carrying capacity would be reduced by early lambing as you have your highest feed requirement when there is least growth, ie within the next month.
I notice all my neighbours running out of grass in august as their sheep numbers have doubled [at least] while I am still waiting for my lambing to start.
So any advantage gained by early lambing could well be lost if feed runs short

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11 years 10 months ago #429156 by wiltshire
Replied by wiltshire on topic its all on
we always have spare paddocks for the sheep to go into after lambing and have a reserve kept aside,just helped another ewe lamb next to the house good to see a healthy set of twins

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11 years 10 months ago #429177 by jimminette
Replied by jimminette on topic its all on
Where we used to live they are working on breeding triplet ewes. Last year they got their ewes scanned and we got all the trippy ewes in the paddock in front of us to keep an eye on. Farmers house was not well positioned to have the ewes near them. It was fabulous watching all these lambs get born and how quickly it actually happens. LOL was funny watching the dogs sneaking in for the afterbirths.

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11 years 10 months ago #429178 by Ruth
Replied by Ruth on topic its all on

jimminette;427355 wrote: ...LOL was funny watching the dogs sneaking in for the afterbirths.

I'm no longer sure about the safety of sheep afterbirth, except I can't see it's a good practice letting dogs get to such things in any case; but if you're around cattle, never let dogs get at the afterbirth! Dogs eating the afterbirth of Neospora carrying cows completes the infection cycle, i.e. dog gets infected, possibly quite ill, then shits the Neospora back onto pastures which infects a whole lot more cows. Please don't ever let it happen!

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