Living on roof water

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12 years 6 months ago #399354 by Murray100
Replied by Murray100 on topic Living on roof water
In coastal Tasman there are a number of Rural Water "trickle" schemes. We get ours pumped along the coast from Richmond and so it is presumably the same as the town supply - not bad but heavily chlorinated. Other areas get poor quality (thin mud) or rely on roof water. The supply is limited by flow restrictors (of dubious calibration) to so many 'units' (1000 litres / unit) a day - we get 2 units and pay a fixed charge regardless of use.

We are thinking about adding a second 25000 litre tank. One option is to gather rain water in the new one, but the logistics of two separate systems seem a bit complex and so we are tending towards running the two off the trickle supply. Any thoughts on this?

PS please delete one "town supply" and add a "trickle from town"

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12 years 6 months ago #399357 by Xartep
Replied by Xartep on topic Living on roof water
We have both a bore and roof collection. The bore is not very nice so we had 30,000 litre tank installed and connected to the original pipes to the house.
We then extended the other bore water lines to go to the house and these are connected to the toilets. If the tank runs dry I can turn a couple of taps and the main pump will have access to the bore again.

All the outside taps are also on the bore, as are the troughs near the house and vege garden.

The other paddock's trough is connected to the neighbors water line that runs through our place from a streamhead in their gully behind us. We can tap into this for house supply if necessary also.

Kinda lucky really, but it had the plumber scratching his head for a while trying to make it work[;)].

3 Cocker Spaniels, 1 Huntaway, 3 Cats, Goats, Sheep, Pigs, Cows, Ducks, Chickens, Bunnies - small petting zoo?:rolleyes::cool:

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12 years 6 months ago #399366 by tehoro
Replied by tehoro on topic Living on roof water
My top tip for saving tank water - get the teenage girls to move out. Haven't had a problem since. Oh, and don't leave the paddock supply on overnight when the 25mm pipe gets disconnected.

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12 years 6 months ago #399377 by Blueberry
Replied by Blueberry on topic Living on roof water
we're nearly entirely on roof water; we have 2 storage tanks, one for farm supply (gravity fed), and a huge, 2-chamber concret storage tank under the house. the farm water tank can be filled up with roof water off the shed, pumped into the tank, or we can pump it up from the stream in the back of our property in an emergency.
for the licence to operate a commercial kitchen on the property, we had to install a UV filter system for the house/kitchen water, which supplies us with clean rainwater, free of chemicals :) [^][^][^]

[;)] Blueberry
treading lightly on mother earth

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12 years 6 months ago #399381 by wyseyes
Replied by wyseyes on topic Living on roof water
When we first arrived on this property, we found a full tank fed from the garage roof, a rusted disconnected pump, and the whole property set up on full pressure town supply. The first thing I did was disconnect all the troughs and taps, leaving only the house on town supply.
Then after fixing 15 leaks (troughs disconnected, dud ballcocks, unconnected floats, broken alkathene fittings, lakes around troughs), bought a wee pump to send the tank water around the land. Had lots of fun trying to see where the 'other end of this pipe is'.
Then the council bill arrived, 2 months after we got here. They wanted over $1000, at $1 per 1000L. The bill was also for 6 months, so we challenged them about not reading the meter on the property sale date. They relented, and then proposed we only pay $600. We challenged again, saying we fixed all the leaks, and now only the house is on town supply. They got a bit ansy, and then demanded $400. We put it to them that they hadn't really got the idea that we aren't going to pay for what we didn't use. So they agreed to read the meter in a month to see what we use over a month, then we'd pay for 3.
We paid $48.
The tank is still hooked up so if we have to I can turn a valve to put the troughs back on town supply (last resort in drought), and we also have a backup bore. In summer when the rainfall is minimal, I trundle another pump out to the bore head, rig it up and fill the tank in 24 hours.

Learned a whole lot about water reticulation systems in a hurry.

oh, and 3 months later the council replaced the water meter on the boundary, it seems that their computer system registered a huge drop in usage and flagged it as a faulty meter. They didn't warn us, or tell us anything, we just arrived home to find fresh digging, and a new blue cover over a trendy new meter.

I see you shiver in anticip......................................................................................ation

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12 years 6 months ago #399397 by Alan Gilbert
Replied by Alan Gilbert on topic Living on roof water
One factor to consider is that rain water contains virtually none of the trace elements usually found in ground water. When we began living on a yacht many years ago we took to swallowing a vitamin/mineral supplement pill each morning to make sure we still got those essential things, and we kept the habit up when we moved ashore five years later. It's probably not neccessary, since we are now eating fresh food instead of tinned and preserved stuff, but we keep it up anyway.
Incidentally, the yacht had two tanks, one of 455 litres which we used for everything except drinking and toilet flushing, and that could be made to last three weeks; and one of 300 litres, which we used only in the galley, and which just never ran out. (Of course, the toilets were flushed with sea water.)
So if you're really really careful with water, it can be eked out over a remarkably long period.
One other point – water suppliers who come to fill your tanks if you run dry are required by law to supply chlorinated water.

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12 years 6 months ago #399402 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Living on roof water
We are about equally on spring and rain water (which your survey does not permit). We have about 200 sq meters of roof catchment, and if we get more than 800mm per year then we have about enough household water for 2 adults and a boy, with some recycling of washing machine water.

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12 years 6 months ago #399411 by Clods
Replied by Clods on topic Living on roof water
We use rain water for the house, and spring water for the animals troughs, and waterblasting the decks/motorbikes etc.

2 horses, 15 Chickens, 1 goat, 2 pigs, 1 cat

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12 years 6 months ago #399413 by jeannielea
Replied by jeannielea on topic Living on roof water
There are several water schemes around Masterton and most I think are administered by the local residents. People pay an annual amount set by them and get an allocated amount of water. We only have a bore but the local scheme goes along the other side of our road so is quite costly to get put over here.

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12 years 6 months ago #399441 by Iniuk
Replied by Iniuk on topic Living on roof water
I have never had town supply- grew up in Central Pacific and then on Waiheke Island. Use a bowl to wash dishes in and throw it on the garden. Divert any grey water onto the garden (possibly illegal) Put a waterproof egg timer in the shower for the visitors. Do not let the visitors do the washing- they'll do it twice a day. Baths only for the unwell.

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12 years 6 months ago #399479 by little red digger
:) Does the 91st person to poll win a free bottle of water?

Dave and Ruth, Oxford Contracting

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12 years 6 months ago #399485 by 3 girls farming
there is a town supply trickle system running at Colyton.. comes out quite a long way towards me... unfortunately not all the way!!... I live on one tank (have another but I've only ever had it pumped over once) and I can survive 4 months without a problem... even more now that I've fixed the 'water feature' coming off one side of the house.... use grey water on the garden, half flush on the loo.. no outside tap. try to pry the girls out of the shower before they turn wrinkly...

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12 years 6 months ago #399494 by kate
Replied by kate on topic Living on roof water

little red digger;394586 wrote: :) Does the 91st person to poll win a free bottle of water?

Er...no, sorry [8D][8D]

Web Goddess

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12 years 6 months ago #399505 by 2D
Replied by 2D on topic Living on roof water
We have roof water collected from the house and also from the woolshed (separate tank). The water for the house is gravity fed from the woolshed and the house tank only serves a couple of troughs. We have put a third 25.000L tank on the highest point and we pump water to this from the house tank during the winter when it is wet so that we can use it during the summer when it is dry. We have recently fitted Tank Vacs to both the house and woolshed tanks and are convinced the water tastes better. You can see the bottom of the tank from the inspection cover too!

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12 years 6 months ago #399507 by 2D
Replied by 2D on topic Living on roof water
Another tip for water saving - those steam mops you can get now clean your floors using a fraction of the water that a bucket and ordinary mop.

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