Silage then hay - too ambitious?

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12 years 7 months ago #28563 by oskatd
Hi, our big front paddock at the new place hasn't been grazed all winter, so the grass is pretty long and we currently don't have the stock to graze it (struggling to get through the grass down the back!). i phoned the man about silage he reckons it's about 6 weeks away. My question is, if i have silage made mid October and then shut it up again, am I being too ambitious to expect it to be ready for hay around Xmas? Which is when everyone in the 'hood get theirs done[^]. Or will it very much depend on how much rain we get etc? Would appreciate feedback if there is no chance.....[}:)]
Ta!

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12 years 7 months ago #390262 by oskatd
anyone????

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12 years 7 months ago #390293 by feedqueen
we doth both, sometimes the hay might be done in feb/march after silage in November. We dont dry out very much over summer as very heavy ground. And thats with carrying stock all year. And fertiliser .

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12 years 7 months ago #390309 by LongRidge
It depends entirely on the weather, and if you can irrigate. We have never managed 2 crops, but got quite close to a second one year. Last year we struggled to get one sparse crop of hay because the weather got really dry in spring. Around here, with irrigation, 3 crops of pasture are possible.

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12 years 7 months ago #390353 by sod
Around Here it is common to do so also when we were over in Otaki we have done it here put the main thing is fertilzer in soil as each crop takes lots out. We always put some on after silage and after hay and when I looked it up it seems to take about 8 weeks for hay after silage and rain

Having time is a measure of enthusiasm:rolleyes:

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12 years 7 months ago #390387 by oskatd
Thanks - obviously we don't irrigate here - plenty of rain usually, although it has been quite dry for the last month or so - having been the wettest year ever! (Had total rainfall for all of 2007 by the end of July....). I guess if it looks dodgy I can shut up a different paddock a bit earlier to make sure I have hay....

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12 years 7 months ago #391077 by Oaklands
Possibly not that helpful as I live in a VERY lush area come the spring flush....

But I can easily get one cut of silage in October and a cut of hay just before Xmas each year if I wish. One year we even got 2 cuts of silage and a later cut of hay in Jan.
The others are on to it though...depends big time on your amount of rain after the silage cut.

The "Naki" kid - living in Taradise [8D]

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12 years 7 months ago #391079 by sod
We have two paddocks shut up as of to-day :D both grazed down now harrowed so hopfully they will come away to make silage/hay which ever if this rain they are talking about really comes as we are so very dry there was dust cloud from the harrows :D . Both theses paddocks have been used as feed pads through winter so they should grow well. We have huge compost piles and liquid fert to go on too. here is hoping for a wetter than now spring with great grass growth for us all :)

Having time is a measure of enthusiasm:rolleyes:

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12 years 7 months ago #391117 by wiredkiwi
Depends on the cost of making and what you're planning to feed it to. To be honest I wouldn't be baling (for hay or silage) over-wintered grass as it's likely to be much less nutritious and stalky enough to cause problems with poking holes in the wrap of baleage. Having said that it depends on your area and what the actual grass is like. If I were you I'd be asking some friendly farmers or contractors what the feed value of the grass is.

If I had an overwintered paddock I'd be looking at mob grazing it for cattle (ask around for the local rate per head per week) then harrowing the cr** out of it then doing your stored feed with good fresh growth. Either that or ask some contractors if they want to buy it as standing grass, then there's no cost to you for baling or carting and no onsale risk.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Horses must be magnetic. Have one and others come along to join it.

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12 years 7 months ago #391125 by oskatd
Yes, wondered that, but is long and soft, not at all stalky..... I wanted it cut before it gets stalky, as stalky bits sticking out the plastic drive me nuts.....

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12 years 7 months ago #391126 by LongRidge
Our Bale Wrappers have different thickness plastic, and can wrap different numbers of wraps (winds of the wrapping machine), depending on the type of crop they are wrapping. If you offered a little bit extra payment per bale, your Wrapper might change his wrap and number of winds for your crop.

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12 years 7 months ago #391183 by sod
We have found if we do it while it is still growing and got plenty of leaf we never have that problem also as LR said but and as good silage is wilted not dried like hay cant see the problem.

Having time is a measure of enthusiasm:rolleyes:

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