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12 years 7 months ago #387698 by Stikkibeek
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Rothwell;381318 wrote: A pure polled Hereford crossed with a Fresian will often give a white-faced, polled calf. If the calf has horns (scurs aren't horns) then it is either a non-polled Hereford (very few of them) or the Hereford has something else in him.

It's not correct to call Herefords, "non-polled". They are either Herefords, or they are Polled Herefords. I think you will find there are still a lot of Hereford studs in NZ.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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12 years 7 months ago #387714 by LongRidge
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I have been informed that there are horned Herefords, and breeders of such. I don't know of any in NZ. I should have used "horned" rather than "non-polled".

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12 years 7 months ago #387718 by Ruth
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LongRidge;381585 wrote: I have been informed that there are horned Herefords, and breeders of such. I don't know of any in NZ. I should have used "horned" rather than "non-polled".

LR you really do step right in it. The Herefords site upon which you can search any registered animal has horned, de-horned, polled and scurred as the options under which to search the database. There are many horned Herefords, and it is the polled variety which are rarer. Many breeders still believe that the horned Hereford is a better animal than its polled cousin. (I suspect prejudice alone in that opinion, although it may also have something to do with the breadth of the genepool.)

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12 years 7 months ago #387760 by LongRidge
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Ruth, on my rubber band internet connection I try to avoid any unnecessary time-wasting by looking up things that don't interest me :-) I'm surprised that there are lots of horned Hereford breeders in NZ. I would have thought that dehorning them would cause more of a growth rate reduction than having polled. I'm not at all convinced that horned are bigger than polled - I think it is much more likely to be some other genetic factor that makes some horned bigger than some polled.

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12 years 7 months ago #387766 by Stikkibeek
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You guys have lost the plot here. Herefords are Horned. The poorer cousins are polled herefords.
These are Herefords

The polled Hereford on the other hand is is a hornless variant of the Hereford, and was finally recognised as a breed in the late 1800s..

Polled Herefords while they have their followers, tend to have a lot more calving trouble, usually due to the heavy shoulder.

Ruth, Hereford breeders prefer Herefords over their variant "cousins" because they have less calving trouble. The heifers in the photograph are Furness Herefords.

And no Longridge, you should not have used "horned"

I have been informed that there are horned Herefords, and breeders of such. I don't know of any in NZ. I should have used "horned" rather than "non-polled".

That would be like calling Texas longhorns, "horned Texas longhorns".

And you now know of at least one Hereford breeder in NZ. :)

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Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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12 years 7 months ago #387768 by Ruth
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Thanks Stikkibeak, that's one more reason I've heard for their superiority - and at least that one can be measured!

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12 years 7 months ago #387874 by caro
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ok, now I'm getting confused again. What we want is beef for the freezer, we are not connosiors (excuse spelling), but like nice, tender meat. We paid $550 for a 9mth old hereford steer (no horns). We need to get him a friend, and keep the cycle going for the freezer. White faces seem to be common and easy to get and cost around $400 for a weaner. I'd love another full hereford steer, but they don't seem that easy to get as weaners. I really don't want horns as I'm not very experienced at handling cattle and want to decrease any risks to myself or the family etc. I also have the option of a miniature hereford X steer, mother was a black white face cow. I've also asked for advise on that in another thread, so please forgive me for repeating myself. Don't know which would be best? Help??

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12 years 7 months ago #387889 by Sue
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Hi caro, sorry we are confusing you!
You probably won't get a full Hereford weaner at this time of the year, (horned, dehorned or polled) as straight beef bred animals, although usually born in the spring are usually reared on their mothers and weaned at about 6 to 9 months, in the autumn.

The calves you can get now (white face Hereford crosses) are born now into dairy herds and usually hand reared to weaner weight-about 100kgs in this case, and sold off around Oct to Dec once they have finished on milk. They will cost around $300 to $400 at this age/weight.

The minature cross bred you mentioned, if he is out of a White face cow-will or should be therefore 3/4 Hereford and 1/4 dairy-probably fresian-so would possibly be the closest you can get to full Hereford right now!

What age is he ?

Most of the full blood Herefords you get in the North Island are probably the polled version, I think the horned ones are more common in the South Island. You will probably be able to tell if he has horns or is dehorned at a very early age, so you shouldn't have to worry there.

Sue
Labrador lover for yonks, breeder of pedigree Murray Grey cattle for almost as long, and passionate poultry person for more years than I care to count.

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12 years 7 months ago #387898 by caro
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The white faces are selling at $415 and are Autumn weaners, weighing in at around 120kgs.

The miniature hereford x $420 and is already 10 months old, the owner says he is naturally polled and his mother was a black white face polled cow.

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12 years 7 months ago #387914 by Sue
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In that case I would say if the Mini Hereford cross is 3/4 beef bred and has been cow reared, at that price he would be better value that half bred and half his age autumn born weaner. What do you think of his size by comparison?

Sue
Labrador lover for yonks, breeder of pedigree Murray Grey cattle for almost as long, and passionate poultry person for more years than I care to count.

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12 years 7 months ago #387916 by caro
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To me he looks huge, just short, but very stocky, I admit, I am leaning more towards him, he just looks so herefordy!! and the bonus is that he is just around the corner and the others are over an hours drive away.

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12 years 7 months ago #387917 by WillEyre
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IMHO, the best eating beef of the crossbreeds is the hereford x jersey. In my neck of the woods they are often called 'Taranaki Tigers'. If they're not strictly for the home table many people steer clear of them because they sometimes show a yellower fat than the abbatoirs want, and will be downgraded. This is probably the reason they often sell at a cheaper sale price. However, to me the possibility of slightly yellow fat is is irrelevant - in fact, I'd prefer that to something that resembles candlewax. The jersey factor seems to make the meat finer-grained and wonderful. Many of my butcher friends, given the choice would eat nothing else in the way of beef.
Ed

I liked Occam's Razor so much, I bought the company.

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12 years 7 months ago #388041 by stephclark
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WillEyre;381819 wrote: IMHO, the best eating beef of the crossbreeds is the hereford x jersey. In my neck of the woods they are often called 'Taranaki Tigers'. If they're not strictly for the home table many people steer clear of them because they sometimes show a yellower fat than the abbatoirs want, and will be downgraded. This is probably the reason they often sell at a cheaper sale price. However, to me the possibility of slightly yellow fat is is irrelevant - in fact, I'd prefer that to something that resembles candlewax. The jersey factor seems to make the meat finer-grained and wonderful. Many of my butcher friends, given the choice would eat nothing else in the way of beef.
Ed


i totally agree.. i just go with the dairy x because the farm is is just up the road and its easy as.. but we have had a few 'tigers' over the years, and we have found them excellant.. as you say, they are cheeper because people think the fat is bright yellow.. ummm i actulaly realy havent noticed a difference.. and who cares anyway?

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