Natural Risks on LSB's

More
13 years 3 months ago #25963 by Jen - Featherston
Inspired by Isla's thread I thought it would be a good idea to chat about some of the natural risks throughout the country we face on LSB's and also what we can do to minimise those risks.

Tomo's
Underground streams
Cliff's
Bogs
Poisonous Plants
Rabbit holes

Please discuss with the view of helping others to become aware of the pitfalls (haha pun intended) in different areas and other things they need to look out for. If someone has done something stoopid, chances are they know it and have learnt from it and hope no one else makes a stoopid mistake. For example it is stoopid to try to carry a bale of hay over a near flooding river in your work clothes with only 15mins before you have catch the train to work. This does not give you enough time to change your clothes after you fall in. Your wet knickers will leave a wet patch on your dry skirt that everyone will see.

Right now you have had a giggle discuss away.

Sometimes its not only what you say, its the way you say it that counts.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361913 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Natural Risks on LSB's
Don't spray weeds on a steep bank when the dew is still on the grass, in gumboots. The gumboots can easily slip, and with the weight of the spray on your back the place that you will stop is the bottom. I darn near smashed lots of bones because I didn't wear the heavy boots .....
With an ATV, dry grass can be very slippery so don't try to go down a steep slope with a load on. I darned near got crushed by an ATV chasing me down the hill as it rolled end over end .....
Wear chainsaw boots and chaps every time you use the chainsaw. I still have to wear heavy boots on the ATV to be able to change gear, from the cut I got on my foot 12 days ago .....

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361915 by kate
Replied by kate on topic Natural Risks on LSB's
I'd like advice on what to do on a property with slips. Our Helena Bay block has a couple of older slips which are not fenced off from the livestock. The farmer who is grazing the land doesn't worry but I'm not so sure... Is there any way to prevent more slips other than putting the whole block into forestry or bush?

Web Goddess

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361926 by sod
Replied by sod on topic Natural Risks on LSB's
Kate plant willows on the slip and at the top in some areas the local council will even supply them for free to stop slips

Having time is a measure of enthusiasm:rolleyes:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361927 by Stikkibeek
Replied by Stikkibeek on topic Natural Risks on LSB's
Don't ride the bullock back to the shed after a hard morning pulling strainers and posts to their new location, particularly if there's a cattle trough on the way.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361928 by eelcat
Replied by eelcat on topic Natural Risks on LSB's
Don't stand on the spade with both feet in order to dig out the feijoa treelet.

1 Border collie, 1 Huntaway, 2 Lhasa Apsos, Suffolk and arapawa ewe crosses, an Arapawa ram,an East Friesian ewe , 5 cats, 42 ducks , 1 rooster and 30 hens, 5 geese, 12 goats, 2 donkeys, 2 house cows, one heifer calf, one bull calf, 3 rabbits and lots and lots and lots of fruit trees...

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361930 by Isla
Replied by Isla on topic Natural Risks on LSB's
We have some very large holes caused by under-running water. In some cases we've had to fence off the areas altogether - particularly where they occur in large native stands and could benefit from fencing anyway. In lots of cases, like the hole where Eva (R2 heifer) nearly lost her life, we've started piling the prunings from the large Totara which grow all around those slopes and whose spreading branches often cause the cattle to venture into the dangerous areas to cross the faces where the holes occur. (If we were to fence off the large areas where the holes are, we would lose about a third of the farm.) As it is, I can see into the future that we will gradually retire some of those more dangerous areas to native regeneration, because I loathe the ongoing stress of worrying about the cattle around the hazards. As I noted in another post, there's approximately a 1:50,000 chance of a beast falling into trouble (based on the incidents which have occured over the last 15 years). That's pretty insignificant, but still a cause for worry. It's definitely significant for any animal which does end up in trouble.

However, it is also true that animals try not to get into such trouble, and generally successfully avoid doing so.

There are some very steep drops in a few places, usually on the edges of stream beds, and I know of one or two cattle which have fallen down them. So far no terrible damage, but again we've had to rescue one animal from just such a fall, when she ended up stuck behind a log at the base of such a "cliff", blocking her way to the stream into which she might otherwise have walked. (Eva's mother, as it happens. Troublesome family!)

In all of these cases, we're filling the holes, and around the steep bits I guess barriers might be the answer, but as has been noted by others trying to fence off difficult areas, fence posts are hard to get in to places you need to protect because they're wet or boggy or falling away.

Being aware of the danger spots means that I take extra care to ensure all the animals are safe and accounted for on a more regular basis than when they're in a safe, flat paddock. I cannot practicably remove all the hazards, so I ensure that if something horrid happens, no animal is left unattended and suffering because of them.

Keeping animals healthy is one very good way of protecting them from accidents. Shaky, hungry animals push further into danger looking for feed, and are more likely to stumble and fall into hazards where they occur.

Those are the physical land risks.

The other risks we should all be aware of, depend on where we are - I'm thinking of flies for sheep and Liver Fluke for cattle, and whatever other internal parasites affect your animals in your area. Flies and Fluke are two perenial problems which kill, particularly when people are not aware the animals in their care may suffer from them.

Fencing off swamps for Fluke control is touted as an option, but it isn't a practical one for us. There's too much wetness for too much of the year, usually. Flooding areas with Copper Sulphate to kill snails is hardly environmentally desirable.

Those are all risks we've had to deal with. In some cases we just have to remain aware of them, because we can't eliminate them. There's only so much you can do to change the real world!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361932 by DiDi
Replied by DiDi on topic Natural Risks on LSB's
Think twice about walking down a steep dry grass slope in jandals. Landing on the bottom (pun intended) part of your spinal column makes life darn unpleasant for a while.

Remember that even if you feel like a spring chicken, trying to leap over a seven wire fence will usually result in going splat and looking more like road kill than athletic goddess.

Remember that trying to pull a reed/weed out manually on the very edge of a muddy dam with one gumboot balanced precariously on the "solid" bit of ground is also going to end badly as your gumboot disappears from underneath you and you splat down (yet again) in muddy spendour.

Remember that as you look around in utter embarrassment, chances are that someone will have seen all this happen and "pi##" themselves laughing. You just hope they wet their pants (too) jerks!

On a serious note - do not keep a hand reared ram lamb entire. Don't keep it or sell it on to someone else. Don't wish to start the "but my boy" debate all over again - just don't risk it as it can turn to disaster especially where small children are concerned.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361936 by Isla
Replied by Isla on topic Natural Risks on LSB's

DiDi;352764 wrote: ...On a serious note - do not keep a hand reared ram lamb entire. Don't keep it or sell it on to someone else. Don't wish to start the "but my boy" debate all over again - just don't risk it as it can turn to disaster especially where small children are concerned.

Head injuries are NO FUN! Don't trust any ram.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361938 by Jen - Featherston

DiDi;352764 wrote: On a serious note - do not keep a hand reared ram lamb entire. Don't keep it or sell it on to someone else. Don't wish to start the "but my boy" debate all over again - just don't risk it as it can turn to disaster especially where small children are concerned.

I second this, and have a solid farm gate with a massive dent in it as proof that its not a good idea (previous owners not me!)

Also my neighbour was off work for ages (builder) after the land owner for which he as building a house assured him that the ram was safe, nope owners 2yo finished patting him 15 mins later he bowled my neighbour from behind *smashing* his knee imagine if it was the 2yo :eek:

Sometimes its not only what you say, its the way you say it that counts.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361944 by terralee
Replied by terralee on topic Natural Risks on LSB's
If you don't believe the pet ram theory[:0] ...try bending over to collect eggs in a wayward chooks nest, under the hedge, in the pet rams' paddock, once he has started giving you those cute wee head butts [xx(][B)]:eek:
Cheers

Leonie & Zoo!!! :silly: :woohoo:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361946 by Lake Rotoiti Magic
Watch out when being sold a friendly rooster.... My poor daughter (15yrs) gets a real hard time from ours, comes up with new scratches and words to accompany them almost daily (doesn't do it to hubby or I? Must be in the body language,or she's holding her tongue wrong). He may end up in the pot. Unless anyone here wants a super friendly minorca. [;)]

40 acres, cattle, suffolk sheep, chickens, and our horses.[:D]

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361951 by Isla
Replied by Isla on topic Natural Risks on LSB's
While this is a very nice thread, it has not addressed the particular issue I attempted to see discussed. I will have to find another way to address it, elsewhere.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361957 by Denneaux
Replied by Denneaux on topic Natural Risks on LSB's
ATVs go up and down hills. Not along hills. When said ATV stops rolling, it never lands the right way up and the handle bars never look quite the same again.

Don't assume cows or sheep won't walk into the sea. Don't assume they will swim back to shore if you stop watching them.

I'm told flax is also a good choice for subsiding areas. That's what we plan on planting as we are trying to stick to natives.

Unless stated, the above post is not meant as criticism.

Go back and read it again in your HAPPY voice!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 years 3 months ago #361963 by reggit
Replied by reggit on topic Natural Risks on LSB's
Make sure that any chain you use to attach to something you want to drag is secure and ensure no-one around who might get hit if it breaks loose and ricochets back :(

We were lucky, the only thing that got damaged was the back of hubby's ute...

Take a break...while I take care of your home, your block, your pets, your stock! [;)] PM me...

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.162 seconds