Rainfall and watering bare rooted plantings

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9 years 8 months ago #37930 by max2
This is probably one of those questions you will roll your eyes at, but if you plant bare rooted stonefruit or even roses now (being the season to plant) and the ground/soil is decently damp, should you water it in and continue to water?

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9 years 8 months ago #490144 by Belle Bosse
Some valuable information on planting:

www.thundermountain.net.nz/Tree-Care-and-Transplanting/

Generally: soak the bare rooted tree roots before planting, then water in after planting.

BUT... since it is winter and the plant is dormant and it is raining frequently... keep an eye on the soil moisture level and don't water unless it needs it.

If it was summer and the plant was transpiring/ evaporating moisture through its leaves and it was not raining, then yes, water regularly, but again, don't over do it!

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9 years 8 months ago #490211 by max2
That is an interesting website Belle. Thankyou.

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9 years 8 months ago #490213 by Name123

Belle Bosse;494819 wrote: If it was summer and the plant was transpiring/ evaporating moisture through its leaves and it was not raining, then yes, water regularly, but again, don't over do it!

I was reading Sepp Holzer's permaculture last night, and here's the section from there:

I begin by laying the trees in the sun, so that the leaves dry out. Naturally, the roots should be covered, because they cannot tolerate sun. I use a wet jute sack to cover the roots. To make sure the leaves dry quickly, the trees must not be watered. The wet sacks will ensure that the roots do not dry out, but they will not provide enough water to supply the leaves. After about a day, the leaves will have dried out and the trees can be replanted. I do not soak the soil before planting or water the trees afterwards. The only protection they receive is a layer of mulch to keep the soil moist. I would never be able to water all of the trees on the Krameterhof, because it would take far too much time and energy. Trees planted using my method quickly develop new, fibrous roots, which supply the trees with nutrients and water again. They can survive the initial lean period, because they no longer have any leaves or fruit to support. If I were to plant a tree in full leaf and fruit instead and not water it, then all of its energy would be used to maintain the leaves. The roots would not get enough attention and the tree would grow badly, if at all. This tree could be compared to a cut flower: it is given plenty of water, yet it can barely support itself. Trees treated using my shock method concentrate on taking root and do not produce shoots until they have the energy to do so. The trees are raised to be independent. I have cultivated thousands of trees over the years using this method. I have bought remainder stock, which are often just chopped up or burnt, from tree nurseries at a very good price and planted them using my shock method . In my experience, trees planted using this method grow best between raised beds. A large amount of moisture collects between the beds and the trees recover quickly. After two to three years the trees have developed so well that I can dig around the root ball and replant or sell them.

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9 years 8 months ago #490219 by Belle Bosse

max2;494896 wrote: That is an interesting website Belle. Thankyou.

No problem Max2.

Next month I pick up our order of young Heritage bare root fruit trees from Thunder Mountain!! So exciting... cant wait!
then I have to pot them all up for late spring planting when the ground is dry enough to work with!

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9 years 8 months ago #490234 by Name123

Belle Bosse;494906 wrote: Next month I pick up our order of young Heritage bare root fruit trees from Thunder Mountain!! So exciting... cant wait!
then I have to pot them all up for late spring planting when the ground is dry enough to work with!

Which ones did you get?

I bought from them last year, and the service was very good. Trees haven't done too well, but I suspect they too much rain and not enough sunshine was at fault.

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9 years 8 months ago #490236 by muri
Name 123, thats an interesting article.
Most people dont realise that plants should be cut back on planting so that the roots dont have to work so hard to support the leaves. Most people dont like cutting back their newly purchased plants tho.
The worst you can do is to fertilise at planting. The plants need to get their roots established in the new environment but cannot be doing that if they have been given fertiliser to make them grow at the same time.
Planting trees in winter is always best so they can establish their roots before they start growing
A bit like whats being described above

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9 years 8 months ago #490490 by Del
Sigh, you're right there Muri, I picked up two bare rooted trees today, an apple and a dual apricot - the last thing I want to do is cut them back, especially the apple which is only a metre tall anyway... But I begrudgingly accept I must, so it's out with the secatuers tomorrow... :(

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9 years 8 months ago #490496 by muri
Del, I would be leaving them as at this stage, they dont have leaves on so the energy of the plant is not being diverted to support the leaves.
I was thinking more of plants with vegetative growth

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9 years 8 months ago #490503 by Organix

muri;494925 wrote: .....
The worst you can do is to fertilise at planting. The plants need to get their roots established in the new environment but cannot be doing that if they have been given fertiliser to make them grow at the same time.
......

This most applicable for soluble ('conventional') fertilisers as the salts will cause burning of the establishing new roots. Better a few handfuls of sheep manure or similar (not chicken!) included in the planting hole which will both provide gentle nutrition and aid water retention.

Harm Less Solutions.co.nz
NZ & AU distributor of Eco Wood Treatment stains and Bambu Dru bamboo fabrics and clothing

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9 years 7 months ago #491950 by tonybaker
I think the accepted practice is to reduce the leaves to a minimum (as there are too few roots to send water up to them) and to water in gently, not too much though. The watering in is to place the fine soil particles close to the roots so that they will not dry out. After that, a mulch around the base is good, so too is a stake. General idea is to keep the soil in touch with the roots.

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

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