Joining a new community - how long until you felt part of it?

More
11 years 1 month ago #456578 by max2
As far as the school issues go, I am not overly happy with where my daughter goes to school and having spoken to an ERO officer in the past not totally confident we should rely on their findings as being a bible to the quality of NZ schools.
They still rely on the Principal and Board to guide them and so of course that is going to be biased to begin with. they are not going to tell them of the new science rooms with no hot water or gas lines to burners.... the leaking rooms, disgusting toilets or the middle of the road students/parents who were asked not to return the following year.

Our school has lost some excellent teachers who contributed to our current ERO appraisal.

Just go and look and go with your gut feeling. Nothing is ever going to be perfect.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 1 month ago #456579 by Ruth

swaggie;457800 wrote: ... You just have to pick the location that suits your requirements and find like minded souls within.

Or actually outside it - and isn't the internet a great opportunity for those of us who do not/cannot fit into the communities of which we are geographical members?

I left this community as a fledgling adult because I knew it could never fit me. I returned because this is geographically and spiritually (in that I am of this land, this place) where I need to be, but the community is much the same. It is conservative in so many ways I find uncomfortable.

Online I've found the few personalities out in similar rural areas who are like those who formed the community of which I was a very central part in the city.

Physically and geographically we'll help anyone at any time and often do. I regularly provide hands-on experience, advice (yeah, LongRidge, advice! because it's requested, even if it isn't paid for) and education to people who have bought small blocks and aren't sure what to do with it or want cattle and don't yet know anything about them. Sometimes I meet people with whom I click and we become long-term friends. Either way it's always an interesting interaction.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 1 month ago #456583 by max2

Ruth;457802 wrote: Or actually outside it - and isn't the internet a great opportunity for those of us who do not/cannot fit into the communities of which we are geographical members?

I left this community as a fledgling adult because I knew it could never fit me. I returned because this is geographically and spiritually (in that I am of this land, this place) where I need to be, but the community is much the same. It is conservative in so many ways I find uncomfortable.

Online I've found the few personalities out in similar rural areas who are like those who formed the community of which I was a very central part in the city.

Physically and geographically we'll help anyone at any time and often do. I regularly provide hands-on experience, advice (yeah, LongRidge, advice! because it's requested, even if it isn't paid for) and education to people who have bought small blocks and aren't sure what to do with it or want cattle and don't yet know anything about them. Sometimes I meet people with whom I click and we become long-term friends. Either way it's always an interesting interaction.


You were quick Ruth, you have my spelling error in there that I changed.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 1 month ago #456588 by kate
When we moved onto this block we dropped a card into each of the neighbour's letterboxes to introduce ourselves. We told them our names, that we'd been living in the Waikato for the last 20 years that we were planning to build a house on the block and that we were bringing on our horses, cattle, goats and cats. We added that we'd love to meet them and would be around if they wanted to call in.

They all called in, thankfully not en masse, and all brought something, either baking or home grown produce :D :D

Web Goddess

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 1 month ago #456596 by ashajade

Kate;457811 wrote: When we moved onto this block we dropped a card into each of the neighbour's letterboxes to introduce ourselves. We told them our names, that we'd been living in the Waikato for the last 20 years that we were planning to build a house on the block and that we were bringing on our horses, cattle, goats and cats. We added that we'd love to meet them and would be around if they wanted to call in.

They all called in, thankfully not en masse, and all brought something, either baking or home grown produce :D :D

Kate, that really sounds like the perfect way to deal with moving into a new area and meeting the neighbours. :)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 1 month ago #456615 by lookingtosettle
Much agreed, I think that is how we will handle things when the times comes (the little card in the mailbox). You have the freedom to write exactly what you want so there is no confusion about who you are or why you are there, and it puts the onus on them to seek you out when time is convenient for them. Perfect.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 1 month ago #456618 by Deanna
What we did was about 2 weeks in, we went down to the local pub and had a drink and I went around the few locals in there and introduced myself, which went down with a laugh and some quizzical ness. And thats how I found our about the local once a month drinks night in our street. I went to that and was made to feel very welcome, so all good. I have been to the church once so far and they were very friendly and I will go back. I intend to suss out the lawn bowls as I play, ( no not old just 54 here ) and one day find where might be a community notice board.

And I went next door after a week and said hi to my nearest neighbour and had a cuppa, we walk our dogs together most nights now, and caught up with the other at the monthly BBQ and drinks night, and he was over within a week to help me with my bees, so all in all awesome.

25 acres, 1400 Blue Gums, Wiltshire sheep, 5 steers, 2 cows, ducks, chickens, bees, dog, cats, retired, 1 husband and 3 grandkids.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 1 month ago #456637 by belinda_h
The best way to feel part of the community is to be part of the community - get out there, join groups, go to social events, get to know people. Some people will welcome you, some won't. That's just life. But you only get out of a community what you're prepared to put in. And there's lots of ways to get involved - service groups, churches, arts groups, volunteering eg fire brigade, Meals on Wheels etc, school activities, tramping clubs . . .

My advice - don't wait for people to make you welcome, make yourself welcome and the rest will follow.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 4 weeks ago #456781 by LongRidge
Our dog went wandering when we first arrived, so we met most of the neighbours looking for her. I now visit new neighbours within about 1km to introduce my dogs, and to tell them to throw stones at them if they wander. It is amazing how some townies call the dog, pat it, and then try to shoo it away, or expect me to discipline it when it comes back to me when I call it.
That way, I can also check their dog/s, and remind them that some of their new neighbours, especially the real farmers, shoot dogs then ask questions later.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 4 weeks ago #456790 by Ruth

LongRidge;458023 wrote: ...I now visit new neighbours within about 1km to introduce my dogs, and to tell them to throw stones at them if they wander. ...

We had a neighbour do something like that, but the dog wasn't on a leash and he couldn't control it and all hell broke loose. It was not a bright start to a new neighbourly relationship. A later neighbour adopted your "shoot it if it wanders" approach. Frankly I'd rather you kept your own dog under control so I don't have to control it for you!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 4 weeks ago #456804 by Aria

Ruth;458032 wrote: We had a neighbour do something like that, but the dog wasn't on a leash and he couldn't control it and all hell broke loose. It was not a bright start to a new neighbourly relationship. A later neighbour adopted your "shoot it if it wanders" approach. Frankly I'd rather you kept your own dog under control so I don't have to control it for you!


A new neighbour of ours had invited us in for a coffee - and as we were on a tour of the beautifully manicured sprawling English country gardens - we were told that if our goats wandered in to their property they would be shot. While doing so their little doggie ran straight through the fenceline and into our lower paddock. :D :D :D

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 4 weeks ago #456808 by Ruth
All great arguments for carrying concealed weapons ... as my senior AB tech used to say when I was doing my apprentice season. Dogs, idiot drivers, all would be fair game. [}:)] Maybe one should place far more emphasis on the owners of said dogs, who don't, won't or can't control them as they are obliged to.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 4 weeks ago #456825 by igor
Aria, would the same neighbour shoot your cow, sheep, or horse I wonder?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 4 weeks ago #456847 by Aria

igor;458071 wrote: Aria, would the same neighbour shoot your cow, sheep, or horse I wonder?


Some months later we got a call to say did we know our goats were loose. Given the earlier conversation I thought, oh dear. On further inquiry as to where exactly they were - we found 'loose' meant 'loose' within our boundary :D . We do keep a very close watch on that particular fenceline - and so far so good. I can see their concern absolutely and I'm sure they would ring before going for the gun. I reckon the initial conversation was just a moment of bravado - a kind of "territory marking" for the benefit of the 'newbies' (us) .. the irony of which was so well highlighted by their little terrier :D :D :D .

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 4 weeks ago #456848 by Ruth
One may shoot dogs, but not domestic livestock. I know this, having been gunning for a bull on its fourth visit into my heifers' paddock some years ago. I was going to shoot the bugger if I could, but a call to Animal Control confirmed I was not permitted to do so.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.154 seconds