Chook manure in the greenhouse

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8 years 9 months ago #40105 by Sweetpea
Hi there,

It's a while since I've posted, but this really is one of the most helpful places, and I'm after some advice.

About 4 months ago, we dug a couple of barrow loads of chook manure into our greenhouse to rot down over winter. It's been well dug over, wetted a few times and the greenhouse has been shut up to keep in the warmth. Is there anything else I can do between now and planting time later in the year?

Thanks in advance!

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8 years 9 months ago #511329 by muri
Replied by muri on topic Chook manure in the greenhouse
I would have been very cautious about digging in chicken manure in a green house. It is very high in nitrogen and gives you soft growth which encourages bugs and weak plants.
All animal manure is best composted first and, although yours has undergone a breakdown over time, it would be still quite powerful and nitrogen etc rich
I would plant a green manure, such as mustard to take up some of the richness and then dig that back in before planting

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8 years 9 months ago #511330 by Stikkibeek
I'd be inclined to add some dolomite to the mix to help speed up the rotting process. Sprinkle and water in. Might be too late for a green crop, and depending on what you want to plant for the summer, it may take a bit longer to break down. Was it already rotted when you put it on, or relatively fresh?

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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8 years 9 months ago #511336 by Sweetpea
Thanks, I wondered about a mustard crop and am picking some up tomorrow, I've only started seeds in trays this week so should have time. I'll add dolomite to the list. When the manure went in it was partly rotted, and I'm hoping the heat in there will have helped the rotting process along.

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8 years 9 months ago #511346 by kai
Replied by kai on topic Chook manure in the greenhouse
I would say, if it is dug in, dont worry about it. Greenhouses tend to grow plants intensively, so fertilisers high in nitrogen once in a while would be good for it.

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8 years 9 months ago #511358 by Deanna

Sweetpea;518381 wrote: Thanks, I wondered about a mustard crop and am picking some up tomorrow, I've only started seeds in trays this week so should have time. I'll add dolomite to the list. When the manure went in it was partly rotted, and I'm hoping the heat in there will have helped the rotting process along.

I did the same as you last year and everything was fine. Cucumbers must have loved it as I was over ridden with the dam things. Luckily I like them. Capsicums were great and tomatoes also. Parsley went berserk. :D

25 acres, 1400 Blue Gums, Wiltshire sheep, 5 steers, 2 cows, ducks, chickens, bees, dog, cats, retired, 1 husband and 3 grandkids.

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8 years 9 months ago #511458 by Barnrat
Chooky-poo could encourage some fungal problems in the warm enclosed space of a greenhouse.

Be ready to spray baking soda if there are any fungal issues.

Add one tsp Baking Soda and one tsp spraying oil to a litre of water. (spraying oil is usually paraffin oil with a surfactant (liquid soap) enabling it to mix with water.

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8 years 9 months ago #511462 by muri
Replied by muri on topic Chook manure in the greenhouse
Good gardening practice is about balance, particularly in soil.
Composting manures so they go through a process will give you better quality of soil and improved plant growth with better plant health , than just taking one element such as manure and only using that
Pest and diseases in green houses can be cumulative over time so having a balanced growing medium is best.
I cant grow much in mine because of the pests inherited over time, particularly the mealy bug which are in the soil and destroy everything that grows there long term. Probably 30 years of growing in the same medium and pouring probably chemicals in for their flower growing business.

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8 years 8 months ago #511902 by Sweetpea
Thanks for everyone's input. We have dolomite lime to be dug in at the weekend. Each year we do remove a good amount of the previous year's soil and add compost from the local freezing works, perhaps we should have stuck with that plan, but still, encouraged to know that others have done similar and achieved positive results. Fingers crossed.

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