griselinia littoralis height?

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9 years 1 month ago #39313 by wendy2011
I have ordered 200 griselinia littoralis, I was told they can grow to 2.5m, but internet tells me they can grow to 5m, while what I am really after is 3m height(we live in Hamilton.)

Wonder if I can actually attrieve 3m height when they are mature? and how far apart should I plant them to get this height? The closer I plant, the shorter they will grow into, is it a correct?

Looking forward to some advice from experienced growers. Many thanks.

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9 years 1 month ago #503720 by muri
Replied by muri on topic griselinia littoralis height?
Many people selling on the net dont actually know their plants and sell for what they perceive people want, unfortunately.
Grisi grow 5m tall x 3m wide.
The closer you plant them to each other the taller they will grow.
I would plant at 1m spacings and no closer.
You start pruning from when they are young and you can keep them low to the height you want but in order for them to bush out, they need to be trimmed along the top to make them bushy.
If you prune the sides they will grow taller.
Its a pity people selling arent more honest, or perhaps more knowledgeable about the plants they sell and I would definitely google plants before I bought in the future.
Hopefully you have 100m to plant? A lot of auctions say plant 30 or 50cm apart as that way they sell twice as many plants as are necessary

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9 years 1 month ago #503742 by Organix
Ours is a windy site and exposed to the west in particular but overall not unsimilar to Waikato conditions generally I suspect. We have just over 100 griselinia planted down a boundary. They were planted over a 4 year period as we felled trees and continued development. Spacing is 0.8-1m. The oldest are about 6-7 years old now and they are about 2m high and 1-1.5 wide.

We were advised to 'nip out the tips' to promote bushiness and after the first year or two have been topped by hedgeclippers but this will soon be a pole trimmer job. The ones behind a 7 wire fence get 'pruned' well by our sheep who enjoy them mightily :)

I note there is also a roadside planting of griselinia on a neighbouring property which is quite a bit older than ours which isn't pruned or trimmed at all and it seems to have topped out at about 3.5-4m

Overall they're a great looking and functional shelter.

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NZ & AU distributor of Eco Wood Treatment stains and Bambu Dru bamboo fabrics and clothing

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9 years 1 month ago #503745 by muri
Replied by muri on topic griselinia littoralis height?
The only thing I have against griselinia as a hedge is that in auckland at least, it doesnt seem to like the humidity and there can be a lot of die back over summer.
Littoralis, meaning of the coast, it is really a plant that likes the wind and coastal conditions and not the humid dry of auckland. I would say there was about 10% die back over aucklands dry summer last year so it will be interesting to see how they come through this summer
They also like good drainage and dont like waterlogging
Its a great plant to sell as people have to replace the ones that died so there is always a good market for them!

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9 years 1 month ago #503748 by Stikkibeek
We have a lot of bird distributed plants popping up in our garden. I've been thinking of relocating them to a hedge-line, but I see that one growing in the hen paddock has been severely eaten by either the hens or the ducks. They are very expensive to buy i the plant shops.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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9 years 1 month ago #503807 by wendy2011
Hi Muri, thanks for your answer.

But you mentioned" The closer you plant them to each other the taller they will grow.", why is that? I thought it is the opposite, because if you plant them closer, their roots won't be able to grow bigger, so the height will be limited, that is my thought but I am not sure about it. Can u explain why you stated that? and can u give me a link on the internet for more information about it? Many thanks.

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9 years 1 month ago #503808 by wendy2011

Organix;509921 wrote: Ours is a windy site and exposed to the west in particular but overall not unsimilar to Waikato conditions generally I suspect. We have just over 100 griselinia planted down a boundary. They were planted over a 4 year period as we felled trees and continued development. Spacing is 0.8-1m. The oldest are about 6-7 years old now and they are about 2m high and 1-1.5 wide.

We were advised to 'nip out the tips' to promote bushiness and after the first year or two have been topped by hedgeclippers but this will soon be a pole trimmer job. The ones behind a 7 wire fence get 'pruned' well by our sheep who enjoy them mightily :)

I note there is also a roadside planting of griselinia on a neighbouring property which is quite a bit older than ours which isn't pruned or trimmed at all and it seems to have topped out at about 3.5-4m

Overall they're a great looking and functional shelter.

Thanks for your answer. Wonder how often I need to nip out the tips? and do you really just nip out the very top tips or you actually cut off the top part quite a bit?

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9 years 1 month ago #503812 by muri
Replied by muri on topic griselinia littoralis height?
If they are planted close together, they dont have anywhere to grow but upwards, their growth pattern is not related to their roots, but the space in which they are growing

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9 years 1 month ago #503821 by Organix

wendy2011;509992 wrote: Thanks for your answer. Wonder how often I need to nip out the tips? and do you really just nip out the very top tips or you actually cut off the top part quite a bit?

For newly planted just cut a few cms off of the main growing stems. This promotes more active growth of side shoots, so bushiness. From then on just a light trim with hedge clippers every six months or so, which will progress into your height and shape control over time.

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9 years 1 month ago #503822 by Organix

muri;509997 wrote: If they are planted close together, they dont have anywhere to grow but upwards, their growth pattern is not related to their roots, but the space in which they are growing

This growth habit is primarily driven by light availability.

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9 years 1 month ago #503829 by wendy2011
Thanks a lot for above very useful advices.

I am also thinking one day I will do some cuttings from these plants to get more plants to be planted on the other boundaries of our land. How old do these plants have to be to provide me with healthy cuttings?

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9 years 1 month ago #503899 by muri
Replied by muri on topic griselinia littoralis height?

Organix;510008 wrote: This growth habit is primarily driven by light availability.

This is largely so but in the situation of having a very cramped growing environment, the plant is going to grow according to the space available and plants growing in a cramped environment are going to stretch upwards, not only in relation to light but also the space available to them

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9 years 1 month ago #503980 by wendy2011

Organix;510007 wrote: For newly planted just cut a few cms off of the main growing stems. This promotes more active growth of side shoots, so bushiness. From then on just a light trim with hedge clippers every six months or so, which will progress into your height and shape control over time.

The plants I have ordered are just about 12cm tall, so still pretty small, should I still cut a few cms off of the main growing stems, or I should wait until they are taller?

Also when you say "the main growing stems", do you mean the middle main stem only, or you also mean the side branches that grow strongly?

When you later on trim with hedge clippers every six month, do you only trim the top bit, or you also trim the tip of the side branches?

Thanks. :)

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9 years 1 month ago #503981 by wendy2011

muri;510100 wrote: This is largely so but in the situation of having a very cramped growing environment, the plant is going to grow according to the space available and plants growing in a cramped environment are going to stretch upwards, not only in relation to light but also the space available to them


so that means in my situation where I want the plants to grow to 3m, I probably need to plant them close to each other, like 50cm apart as suggested by the seller so they can grow upwards as I desire. Am I right?

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9 years 1 month ago #504032 by Organix

wendy2011;510195 wrote: The plants I have ordered are just about 12cm tall, so still pretty small, should I still cut a few cms off of the main growing stems, or I should wait until they are taller?

Also when you say "the main growing stems", do you mean the middle main stem only, or you also mean the side branches that grow strongly?

When you later on trim with hedge clippers every six month, do you only trim the top bit, or you also trim the tip of the side branches?

Thanks. :)

Our plants were between 0.4 - 0.6 high when planted so a year or two older ex-nursery than yours. About $3 each wholesale from memory.

For plants that small just pinch the tip (1cm) out of the dominant leader/s with your fingernails. This will direct growth to secondary side branches so that you will promote bushiness by having more competing leaders. The main leader generates the hormone auxin at its tip which hinders competition. By removing the tip you are promoting competition.

How much you trim off as the plants grow will depend on how strictly you want to limit height and/or promote bushiness. Clipping side branches (especially too early) will promote height as this will have the reverse effect of topping.

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NZ & AU distributor of Eco Wood Treatment stains and Bambu Dru bamboo fabrics and clothing

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