Greenhouse - concrete floor or not?

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10 years 7 months ago #469702 by muri
Carlyjean, I also practice organics and biodynamics but what we are talking about here are two different kinds of soil.
My plant house has been going for over 40 years as this property was once a market garden. In those 40 years it has seen a lot of crops and the build up of pests and diseases in an indoor area is very different from in an outdoor scenario.
While I agree with you regarding soil improvement etc, in an enclosed situation improving soil through compost etc will not necessarily get rid of garden pests such as mealy bug. Renewing the soil would be the only way
I also agree that hydroponic plants will only be as good as the minerals that they are fed and definitely prefer the flavour of soil grown plants

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10 years 7 months ago #469717 by carlyjean
Muri- yes that is true- sometimes the soil in our manufactured environments suffer as we attempt to recreate nature!! And henceforth problems often occur! And I guess that is the price we have to pay- unless we move to the tropics:) (tempting huh?)

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10 years 7 months ago #469725 by kai

carlyjean;472216 wrote: Sorry this was not 'ridiculing' hydroponics- it's merely a different view.

OK, dismissing it without evidence is probably a more accurate description.

Hydroponics gets a bad reputation because large commercial growers grow the varieties that supermarkets demand - long shelf life, uniform unblemished appearance etc. Taste is rarely a factor hence why people think hydroponically grown food is inferior. If you grew organically to the same criteria, your food would taste the same.
Most hydroponic setups use some form of growing medium, in my case I used an organic medium - coconut fibre. Not all hydroponic setups are the same. My own was pesticide free

I personally think the term "organically grown" is a mockery as it involves use of large amount of inorganic chemicals many of which are highly toxic (copper sulphate tea anyone? I think not).

These days I grow using what I believe is a sustainable approach. Following rules laid down by organic organisations 100% is not sustainable for most people unless they are passionate about the subject.

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10 years 7 months ago #469730 by muri
Kai which inorganic toxic chemicals out of interest.
Copper sulphate is a good example as there is only very limited use of it permitted, and in some regimes, not permitted

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10 years 7 months ago #469737 by carlyjean
"Inorganic chemicals?" Maybe on a huge scale- similar to what you describe for supermarket hydroponic growers- but in a home organic garden most would not use any chemicals- all fertilisers I make are made with natural ingredients (seaweed,comfrey, nettle etc). And same with pest control.
Good to hear your comment Kai about the difference between your hydroponics and large scale. I can see it is preferable in that comparison. I understand that the minerals you put in will determine how healthy and tasty they are. However... in BioDynamic study- the minerals taken up by the plant is only one facet of many things the plant needs to thrive in its natural and healthy state. The 'connection' with the earth is super important.

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10 years 7 months ago #469785 by kai

muri;472251 wrote: Kai which inorganic toxic chemicals out of interest.
Copper sulphate is a good example as there is only very limited use of it permitted, and in some regimes, not permitted

lime is another, salt if you are sprinkling it on your asparagus

also many chemicals even though they may be derived initially from soil or plant materials are inorganic by definition.

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10 years 7 months ago #469786 by kai

carlyjean;472258 wrote: The 'connection' with the earth is super important.

Not necessarily. Plants thrive when people looking after them love the plant. It could be a pot plant in bought potting mix, something in the ground or something in a hydroponic set up. I genuinely believe that plants pick up on the energy given by humans. Those who believe that organic principals is the only way to go, probably love their plants, but equally those following traditional methods and love their gardens also love their plants. It is not the method of growing that determines how the plants thrive, but the energy they pick up on from those caring for them.

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