Mutlifuel vs Wood Burner?

More
5 years 11 months ago #523812 by Bog
I have to quickly make a decision about the type of fire I need in a new build. I want something with a lot of grunt and that will go through most of the night and be easy to get started first thing in the morning. I want one that's at least 20kW with optional wetback. I was looking at either the Metrofire Mega Rad 24kW, or the Woodman Tarras MkIII 23.4 (I don't like the top of the Tarras), or the Firenzo Contessa RU 23kW but then got to wondering about and wood/coal burner.

Getting wood isn't a problem, but it seems that coal is also going to be quite cheap over the coming years and probably would be good for keeping the fire going throughout the night.

I'd appreciate your comments, advice and experience with helping me make a decision as to what type of burner I go for. What would you recommend?

Thanks.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 11 months ago #523825 by Stikkibeek
Depending on your budget, you might like to consider something you can also cook on as well. They are expensive, but will pay themselves off over time. The Wagener Fairburn comes to mind as a good choice.
We have a Metro wee ped and it doesn't put out any where like 20kw, but it heats our whole house, regularly boils the water in the cylinder. With a good backlog, and the damper turned down, it will quietly tick over all night and spring back into life just by opening the damper. It is wood only, not multifuel.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S
The following user(s) said Thank You: Bog

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 11 months ago #523826 by Bog
Replied by Bog on topic Mutlifuel vs Wood Burner?
What a wood burner! www.wagenerstoves.co.nz/wagener-fairburn

That's a bit too much for me though. I'd rather leave the mess in the kitchen, because I will make a mess. Not for me, but thanks.

I'm happy to pay good money, and the one's I'm looking at seem to be around 3K in price plus the flue. Give or take a couple hundred either way. I grew up with wood burners, but spent much of my mid-life using electric. I got a fire about four years ago and I'll never now not have a fire. I can't go without that particular type of winter warmth. There isn't another form of heating like it.

Anyone here from the deep south? What do you use, or would recommend?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 11 months ago #523845 by fishandchips
Dunedin based so close to the deep south. We have a Metro extreme ped in our place and a heat transfer kit. Chuck a couple of gum rounds on it and it will still be ticking away in the morning. Great fire.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 11 months ago #523860 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Mutlifuel vs Wood Burner?
We have a Contessa, which is all right except the bricks break too easily, and because we have 2 stories the soot builds up in the top of the flue. We are able to cook on the surface very well, and the wetback means that we can turn off the power to the hot water cylinder when we start the fire in April. For the two of us it saves about $80 per month.
In the Tasman District there are regulations about using a clean air model, but we are outside the clean air zone so our model can be damped right down whenever we need less heat. Clean airs let more air into the fire so it burns faster.
With coal, I understand that the fireplace needs to have a grate. If so, this would mean that the wood would burn too quickly, and thus put out too much heat.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 11 months ago #523861 by Bog
Replied by Bog on topic Mutlifuel vs Wood Burner?
My existing Magnum P100 has two broken bricks. The chimney sweep said they weren't a problem. Should I replace them?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 11 months ago #523862 by Stikkibeek
We used to have a Magnum P100 (great little fire) in our old house. it broke the top ceramic plate but was easy to replace. I imagine the side bricks would be too. I think the company has been taken over by someone else, so would pay to check

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 11 months ago #523877 by tonybaker
Replied by tonybaker on topic Mutlifuel vs Wood Burner?
before you decide which appliance to go for, make sure the builder knows you will be putting a flue in. You don't want kinks or elbows anywhere and you need good clearance from surrounding woodwork. Also you need to be able to get access to the top of the flue without balancing on a ladder!
My woodburner burns coal as well as wood, the coal seems to burn away quickly and smells bad. I would go for wood, but firewood has to be dry to burn well.

5 acres, Ferguson 35X and implements, Hanmay pto shredder, BMW Z3, Countax ride on mower, chooks, Dorper and Wiltshire sheep. Bosky wood burning central heating stove and radiators. Retro caravan. Growing our own food and preserving it. Small vineyard, crap wine. :)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
5 years 9 months ago #525787 by Kiwi Tussock
I wonder if you have sorted you problem by now. Im a tad late in seeing the topic.
I have a bias but I'd certainly STRONGLY suggest that a fire that does more than heat its immediate environment, be seriously considered. You can sometimes find an old Wellstood, Rayburn, Esse, Stanley or the Bosky, which will do far more than just keep you warm.
They have the abilities to heat the hot water cylinder's water, heat varying numbers of room heating radiators (The number of radiators depends on what sized boiler the cooker has) plus has the ability to do every day cooking, kettle boiling and slow 'crock' pot type cooking in the lower ovens. Cookers made of Cast Iron are longer lasting than those made of sheet metal, ( I do have a preference of something that can give longevity of service or use)
Old Esse cookers are not too friendly for getting replacement parts for but the others are pretty good.
Dollar wise at this time, an old cooker of about 3kW size Boiler will set someone back about 5K. A good flue between $700 to $1000

The chap Tony Baker who made a comment on this topic, is most certainly agreed with. He knows 'his stuff' The installation of the correct flue & the correct installation of it is paramount.
The wrong flue, makes for money being wasted, even if its a first rate appliance. Cookers are most certainly not an exception. Incorrect flue design can mean either wasted fuel (cause it burns way too quickly or lots of smoke and bugger all heat and therefore, dense foods like a roast, not cooking like they should do.
Also if the flue runs too cool, then far more flue cleaning is required and that excess condensation coming down the flue will cause rust problems to the appliance, when its not in use.

If considering a cooker type appliance, then somewhere on the Rayburn web site, www.rayburn-web.co.uk/ it gives a run down on the economics of the initial outlay of the installation of a cooker. I have recommended folks take a look at it as I find it a very good web site and has a wealth of really helpful data.
There is generally still a whole lot of life in a cheap old cooker if it is made of cast iron. It or they often need checking over to ensure their safety is up to spec but restoration can often be done at a bit at a time.
They MUST have a complete set of fire bricks in them all the times, as if a major internal cast iron panel warps or breaks, then replacements can be pretty expensive. But even if those repairs are costly, in a reality short number of years, it proves economical because of the multi functional aspect of a cooker. I remember hearing on Nine till Noon, that electricity has doubled in price since the year 2000. A pretty good reason to consider a multi functional appliance I reckon.
Anyway, hope you have sorted your heating probs, which ever way you have gone.

Best wishes

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.238 seconds