Computer ransom virus

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9 years 2 months ago #34932 by wandering free
My son's computer got infected by the "Australian Federal Police Ukash" virus, by the time I got their it had completely locked the screen and put a grey mask over it so we couldn't see how to get into task manger or control panel, nothing worked, so finished up reinstalling windows, to day I did a search for fixes and see there is a rescue disk that you can download to remove it, the virus comes in many forms as this enplanes and has a download of the free rescue zip file.

forums.anvisoft.com/viewtopic-54-3968-0.html

What surprised me was that his Norton's security that he pays for hadn't blocked it.

Just me and the cat now, on 2 acres of fruit and veg + hazel nuts, macadamia, chestnuts and walnuts,
www.youtube.com/user/bandjsellars?feature=mhee

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9 years 2 months ago #459218 by DiDi
Replied by DiDi on topic Computer ransom virus
Never heard of this one so looked it up and came across this:
malwaretips.com/blogs/australian-federal-police-virus/

Darn! Perhaps if anyone else has a problem this may give them additional options to a full reinstall.

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9 years 2 months ago #459285 by Akzle
Replied by Akzle on topic Computer ransom virus
windows is a security joke. if you want a secure OS, install one of the linux flavours, or shell out for a mac.

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8 years 8 months ago #473579 by McDuncan
Replied by McDuncan on topic Computer ransom virus
It looks like this disease progresses - now they have the New Zealand Police Ukash virus version !
Same ransomware but with NZ Police logo.

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8 years 8 months ago #473586 by zellakanzx
Replied by zellakanzx on topic Computer ransom virus
it could be the gcsb!

Download and keep on hand UBCD.
If you suspect you have a virus, turn the pc off, at the wall if you have to.
If youre not literate, get a friend, if you are, use ubcd to image your disk to a backup place, write the drive to zeros and reinstall. Painful, but better than losing everything or paying a comp dweeb 120$/hr.


cheers
rob

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8 years 8 months ago #473609 by wandering free
I like "Nortons Ghost" as a backup, I keep an original I took just after installing XP on a DVD, plus a current Ghost copy I keep up to date on a partition, it has saved a lot of hassles over the years. I keep system restore switched off, saves a lot of disk space and keeps the computer running faster.

Just me and the cat now, on 2 acres of fruit and veg + hazel nuts, macadamia, chestnuts and walnuts,
www.youtube.com/user/bandjsellars?feature=mhee

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8 years 8 months ago #473633 by zellakanzx
Replied by zellakanzx on topic Computer ransom virus
ubcd or any flavour of linux will provide you with an image that's more stable than .gho and can be backed up by any other ubcd or linux flavour.

and it's free.

and free is good.


cheers
rob

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8 years 8 months ago #473642 by spark
Replied by spark on topic Computer ransom virus

wandering free;460681 wrote: What surprised me was that his Norton's security that he pays for hadn't blocked it.

Unfortunately that is often the case with "new" malware.

Generally, security software has a list of known bad programs that it compares your downloads to. Think of this as being like the bouncer on the door to your shop, who has a photo album of known crooks. If someone (who happens to be a bad guy) fronts up to the door, isn't in the photo album, and doesn't obviously look like a bad guy (heuristic scanning) then your bouncer will let them in - this is why it is so important to regularily update your antivirus/security definitions. Heuristic scanning is an attempt to detect new malware that is not known yet - but like your bouncer denying entry to those wearing balaclavas, or motorcycle helmets, it is not 100% perfect.

Make sure that the other software that you use is kept up to date (your web browser, Adobe PDF, Java, Flash, etc) as generally, the older versions of these programs have more security flaws that the bad guys can exploit to take control of your computer.

When you download and run a program, you are basically letting that program, and by extension the people who wrote it, do anything they want to do with your PC (and some of these people are VERY computer savvy). So, do not just download or install any software willy-nilly, even it it promisses to rid your computer of virii, entertain you, or display a cute animal screensaver. The same sort of warnings apply to email attachments - did your friend really send you that attachment, or has a bad guy taken control of your friend's email (or even their whole computer) and sent you the attachment?

Outside of some of the free "open source" software out there (like UBCD, Libre Office, Linux, 7-zip, GNU tools, etc), there is no such thing as a free lunch, and you usually end up paying, one way or another. If it sounds to good to be true, it probably is - check with a computer savvy person if in doubt.

Back when the internet was the "wild west" in the mid 1990's, most malware was the equivalent of teenage delinquents tagging, throwing rocks through windows and lighting fires, however, today, the internet is more like a bustling city, complete with an ineffectively policed seedy underbelly inhabbited by organised crime groups that are collectively stealing huge sums of money from the general public through various cyber-fraud schemes.

Just like in the real world, if you hang out in the dodgy parts of town ("free" pornography, pirated software, etc) you are probably more likely to suffer from crime than if you stick to the respectable parts of the internet. (the free porno or pirated software is often the "bait" to attact "marks").

Cheers

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8 years 8 months ago #473958 by RhodeRed
Replied by RhodeRed on topic Computer ransom virus

wandering free;460681 wrote:
What surprised me was that his Norton's security that he pays for hadn't blocked it.


If you look at the definitions of what a virus/malware does to your computer, ... Norton AntiVirus/Norton Security actually fits alot of the criteria for a virus/malware itself.

I had to go to loooooong extremes to remove that rubbish off my machines along time ago and have never gone near their *cough* "products" since.

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8 years 8 months ago #473974 by zellakanzx
Replied by zellakanzx on topic Computer ransom virus

spark;476556 wrote: but like your bouncer denying entry to those wearing balaclavas, or motorcycle helmets, it is not 100% perfect.

that's a lot of words in that post.

i refuse to buy fuel at places that wont sell it to me while wearing a motorcycle helmet.

slightly more understandable if i didn't actually arrive on my motorcycle. but still.


cheers
rob

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8 years 8 months ago #473989 by wandering free

spark;476556 wrote:
Just like in the real world, if you hang out in the dodgy parts of town ("free" pornography, pirated software, etc) you are probably more likely to suffer from crime than if you stick to the respectable parts of the internet. (the free porno or pirated software is often the "bait" to attact "marks").

Cheers

Hi spark, My son had only had the computer a short time and was just surfing the net, he'd gone onto a film download site but hadn't tried to download anything.
I think he now uses Zone Alarm for security.
It's such a big learning curve when you first get a computer, he'd never been interested in them until he went into business and found they are a necessity these days.
I don't know how parents keep children safe these days, my eldest son is tearing his hair out over our 13 year granddaughters Facebook page he had band her from having, only to find her mother was encouraging her, but like a lot of couples these days they have new partners and the children play one off against the other, the pleasures of the computer age.

Just me and the cat now, on 2 acres of fruit and veg + hazel nuts, macadamia, chestnuts and walnuts,
www.youtube.com/user/bandjsellars?feature=mhee

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8 years 8 months ago #474001 by Organix
Replied by Organix on topic Computer ransom virus
Anything free is usually worth exactly that, or is deriving a return from you in other ways. You get what you pay for!

We run Eset NOD32 Antivirus and our emails all come through Mailwasher's proxy server system. From time to time NOD32 will deny access to a site or block a download and another potential crisis is averted. The numerous spam emails that get past our ISP's filters is marked for 'Blacklist' and never seen again.

When we had a teenage boy in the household we ran NetNanny but thankfully that was before the days of Facebook and other such viral social media. Incidentally we canned FB almost a year ago as the security risks it presented to our online business were far too great, and most of the followers we had were either kids or 'tyre kickers' anyway. Also a friend based in Korea was told by his very IT savvy associates that if you are a member of FB it allows anyone with basic hacking skills access to your computer in less than an hour, probably including the GCSB [;)]

Harm Less Solutions.co.nz
NZ & AU distributor of Eco Wood Treatment stains and Bambu Dru bamboo fabrics and clothing

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8 years 8 months ago #474044 by spark
Replied by spark on topic Computer ransom virus
Hi,

Simply visiting a dodgy site can be enough to get infected (alougth this is less likely if all your software is up to date with the latest security patches) eg www.h-online.com/security/news/item/Expl...oftware-1230724.html (some of the bad guys that make this stuff are very clever)

Considering that many children are more computer-savvy than their parents (and may quietly find a way around your censorware, or alternately use mobile broadband which is only going to get cheaper), I consider censor software like net-nanny to be a poor substitute for real parenting. Sometimes censorware blocks non-offensive websites that deal with controversal political themes like LGBT issues, pro-life/pro-choice, etc or subjects like contraception, sexualy transmitted infections and "clinical" information about human reproduction.

Just like crossing the road, or learning to ride a bike, considering that your children are eventually going to have full unsupervised internet access, they need to learn the required skills to keep them and their friends safe whilst not falling foul of the law. So, start them off with using a device in a public area of the house under parental supervision, and as they mature and demonstrate the right skills and behaviour, you can reduce the level of supervision until eventually, you can give them the password to your wireless access point so that they can have internet access on their own device from the privacy of their own room. If they abuse their freedom, then they loose it (eg if the school tells you that they are bullying another student online, then you ban them from the internet for a while and talk with them about what they have done and why it is bad).

Re: FB - Your children need to understand that they are not FB's customer, and that FB don't give a [email protected]#n about them. They are the product that FB sells to advertisers. They monitor everything you do on FB and everything that your friends do so that the advertisers can work out what sort of marketing ploy will be most effective at convincing you to buy things that you don't really need or want. Of course FB cooperates with the GCSB and the NSA (and the US Gov't has recently publicly claimed that they have the right to carry out extra-judicial executions aka drone-strikes outside of what would be regarded as a theatre of war).

Another good point is that once you put something on the internet, or send it to someone who you think is a friend, you have as good as lost control of it. You might think that it is cool to post a photo of you boozing or smoking weed with your mates when you are 16yrs old, but in a few short years time when you go for a job, your prospective employer might do a search for your name and see that photo and reject your application.

This probably sounds paranoid, but if the GCSB want into your PC, FB is not the only way that they can do it. Remember that our GCSB is in bed with the NSA, and that Microsoft (and other major US software companies) routinely pass details of un-patched security flaws in their software to the NSA. Considering that many of these security flaws take weeks or months to repair and push the update out to users, this gives the NSA (and GCSB, GCHQ, ASIO, etc) an window of oportunity to use these security flaws as a way into a target's computer.

Cheers

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8 years 7 months ago #474052 by zellakanzx
Replied by zellakanzx on topic Computer ransom virus

spark;476996 wrote:
This probably sounds paranoid, but if the GCSB want into your PC, FB is not the only way that they can do it.

too bloody right.
and the same can be said for hackers.

apple were smart. the guy who was routinely hacking their software, now works in their security division.
i think mac have had a total of 6 viruses in recent memory. windows? don't even try counting.
all microsoft ever do is replace the old bugs with new ones.

it's all fairly ambulance at the bottom of the cliff stuff. it doesn't matter how much you pay (or dont), if someone specifically targets you, they're gonna get it.
fortunately most crap on the internet is either just for lulz, or scammers

i haven't run avir for 12 years (since XP was released) and only last month actually got a virus (described above) and that was while connected through a (thoeretically secure) work network!


cheers
rob

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