Dung beetles dumped on...........

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11 years 3 months ago #452931 by helen55

jennym;453691 wrote: i would rather that they are not introduced because i want to continue picking up the bags of poo left on the side of the road for my trees.

i know it is selfish but it is so easy.


I don't think dung beetles will cause you any problems:
  • they are beetles not piranha :) - it takes them ages to munch through the poo;
  • they probably wouldn't be able to get into the bags of poo that are left on the side of the road[}:)]. And even if they could, the poo needs to be in contact with soil so that they can take it undergound and munch on it.

Living on a 7 acre property near Oamaru I currently have 5 wonderful Standardbred horses, 8 alpacas, 6 former battery hens, 1 labrador and 8 cats. I eat only plant based food and love trying new plant based recipes. Retired from the paid workforce in December 2019 and have never been busier!!

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11 years 3 months ago #452945 by reggit
As Helen says...those folk who are conscientious enough to remove horse poo from paddocks and bag it up - to keep down smell/flies/worm burdens - will do it every day or so, so your supply won't 'dry up' as it were :D

Take a break...while I take care of your home, your block, your pets, your stock! [;)] PM me...

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11 years 3 months ago #453012 by muri
Actually, once the dung beetles are working really well and at the peak of the season, the dung disappears within about 24 hours.
The improvement in animal health with the reduction of worms and flies would be an enormous and a real consideration for the welfare of animals, rather than our fruit trees

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11 years 3 months ago #453039 by Stikkibeek
Now if you can only get those animals to camp under the trees, you will not have to pick up bags from the roadside. The dung beetles will take care of it where it lies.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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11 years 2 months ago #455190 by Rata
A new article about this. www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10870103

I can't make up my mind whether I thnk it's a good idea or not. Like Longridge, I'm inclined to be cautious - it's such a huge change to our soil ecosystem. On the other hand getting rid of dung into the soil, increasing carbon, improving drainage, reducing flies etc sounds like a Good Thing... Either way, I'll doubt they'll survive the frosts down here.

I don't take the assertions of people who want to make money out of something too seriously.

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11 years 2 months ago #455195 by igor
I'm inclined toward the belief that dung beetles are a good thing to have around. There will still be plenty of spare poo for the gardens every time someone cleans out their animal barns or covered yards.

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11 years 2 months ago #455204 by muri
There is nothing quite like a drought and lack of grass to show us how much dung is actually deposited on our land.

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11 years 2 months ago #455206 by Stikkibeek
And if they work effectively, there will no longer be a need to harrow in that dung and potentially damage pasture

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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11 years 2 months ago #455208 by jeannielea
A couple of things interested me in the report. First the worry seems to be that disease such as e-coli could spread and the examples given are if the beetles fly into water tanks and if children eat the beetles. I thought most water tanks are covered and since they are not full of poo, one might think beetles would only get in by accident so the chance of disease must be pretty slim. And children eating them?!! What about the kids who pick up poo off the paddocks in order to make some money by selling bags at their gate. Wouldn't they be more at risk than the (presumably) few eaters.Having tried to eat one a kid isn't likely to try again.
Secondly they say the beetles will be $1 or $2 each and cost to a farmer would be $5,000 to 10,000. So with the economic situation it might take a long time for large colonies to become established and therefore the risk is small for quite a long time.
Yes we need to be careful about what is brought into the country, but we also need to be sensible, and the above arguments seem to be based on guesses and opinion rather than science and known facts.

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11 years 2 months ago #455210 by muri

jeannielea;456298 wrote: A couple of things interested me in the report. First the worry seems to be that disease such as e-coli could spread and the examples given are if the beetles fly into water tanks and if children eat the beetles.

I mean how stupid is that as an argument, thats more than being pc, i see it as plain stupid
I would imagine the disease caused by NOT having dung beetles is much higher as the flies that breed in the manure are known carriers of disease.
Do they worry about the children eating flies and do they worry about the flies falling in to the water tanks too??
And then there is that article this week on the potential for bringing foot and mouth to NZ because of the absolutely filthy, rat ridden unhealthy conditions in which pke is grown, which we import and feed to our animals.
The chances of importing foot and mouth via that medium is far stronger than the chances of some little kid eating a dung beetls.
For goodness sake.
If you have seen a dung beetle, they are black and ugly [scarab beetles] and kids are more likely to run a mile than eat the critters

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11 years 2 months ago #455228 by kindajojo

muri;456294 wrote: There is nothing quite like a drought and lack of grass to show us how much dung is actually deposited on our land.

Muri I am with you some of my paddocks are covered in sheep pellets. It is interesting to see the amount now that the normal cycle has stopped!, the good thing is it is dry and well spread around.
Not sure about the impact of worms and how well they survive drought.
FE and barber pole worm have not been a problem this year either.
Also we have been feeding a lot of willow and poplar and it will be interesting to see how the conditions affect lambing %. The sheep are well covered and were quite fat but they are dropping /just maintaining now.

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11 years 2 months ago #455252 by helen55

Rata;456280 wrote: A new article about this. www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10870103

I can't make up my mind whether I thnk it's a good idea or not. Like Longridge, I'm inclined to be cautious - it's such a huge change to our soil ecosystem. On the other hand getting rid of dung into the soil, increasing carbon, improving drainage, reducing flies etc sounds like a Good Thing... Either way, I'll doubt they'll survive the frosts down here.

I don't take the assertions of people who want to make money out of something too seriously.


The dung beetles on my Southern Tablelands property in NSW survived temperature extremes between minus 7C and 45 C.
I really can't believe the 'crap' that's going on about dung beetles. I'd bet my last dollar that noone in Australia has become ill due to the presence of dung beetles on their property.

Living on a 7 acre property near Oamaru I currently have 5 wonderful Standardbred horses, 8 alpacas, 6 former battery hens, 1 labrador and 8 cats. I eat only plant based food and love trying new plant based recipes. Retired from the paid workforce in December 2019 and have never been busier!!

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11 years 2 months ago #455376 by BlueSkyBee
Interesting info on dung beetles currently in NZ, including the native species.

dungbeetle.org.nz/what-are-dung-beetles/native-species/


To dig in one’s own earth, with one’s own spade, does life hold anything better? –Beverly Nichols


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11 years 2 months ago #455386 by Stikkibeek
Well that article tends to blow the knockers who urge caution because a child might eat a beetle, or it might contaminate tank water. If the tropical one introduced in Whangarei in the 50s hasn't caused widespread disease in humans, yet has managed to spread as far south as the kaipara, then the newer varieties waiting to be released can hardly be accused of so doing.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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