A question for beekeepers.

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11 years 4 months ago #445932 by Stikkibeek

Hawkspur;445954 wrote: If you don't want to touch the fibrolite, can you come at it from the other side: take off the wall lining?

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Ah Hawkspur!" She sighs, shaking her head sadly. "If you had had to live through 8 months of gib removal, renewal and plastering with all the attendant sanding during a recent renovation. "You wouldn't dare mention that wall lining thing" She shouts hysterically and more than a little irrationally

and the b... dust has gone everywhere! Besides which, I have no desire to fill a perfectly good bedroom with bees!

Aquila, I am in Southern Auckland.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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11 years 4 months ago #445939 by Aquila
Replied by Aquila on topic A question for beekeepers.
Pm me your details and I'll ask on the bee forums if anybody is close and can help with a lure box. Don't rip into the walls.

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk 2

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11 years 4 months ago #445964 by Hawkspur
Replied by Hawkspur on topic A question for beekeepers.
OK then. No wall lining removal.[B)][;)]
It really is an easier option than removing fibrolite, which requires a fully suited licensed person (know any who are also beekeepers?)and complete enclosure of the work area to prevent dust drift, and then removal from site in a sealed container. $$$ (You could reclad a defined area to make it look OK.)
Smoking quietens bees by making them load up with honey preparing for escape from fire so perhaps serious smoking for long enough would work, but if those who know bees say it won't, I don't know that your wall lining stands a chance. :p

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11 years 4 months ago #445969 by Aquila
Replied by Aquila on topic A question for beekeepers.
No need for ripping into the wall linings. A lure box might get them to vacate the wall for happier times elsewhere. The other reason is that to cut the wall open will cause the bees to defend their home in the only way they know how.

There is no "licence" to be a beekeeper and if you know the bees you seldom need a suit either. Smoking the bees calms them but you often don't need that either.

As I said, I'm on the beekeeping forums (Might be a good reason why) But I'm in Canterbury. PM me your details and I'll ask on the forums for a beekeeper to give you a call and come see what they can do.

Most beeks are always keen for a free colony of bees.

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11 years 4 months ago #446059 by lydiar
Replied by lydiar on topic A question for beekeepers.
Here are the contact details for swarm control: www.franklinbees.co.nz/swarm-control/ and www.auckbeeclub.org/SwarmControl .

I am very concerned about one of the comments in this forum about luring bees with honey. It is very important to NEVER feed bees honey (other than their own) - this is a a very common way to spread AFB and other diseases.

The bees have now been in there over six months and with the nectar flow starting, they will build up very quickly now. However you remove the bees, you will need access to the inside of the walls to remove the comb. Dead brood will smell like rotten fish. Unripe honey will ferment and grow mould. Beeswax will attract more bees in the future and is flammable - Fortunately the winter slows them down but there could already be tens of Kilos of wax and honey in there!

As far as the laws are concerned, by not doing anything and effectively adopting the bees, you may be subject to the beekeeping laws. These include registering as a beekeeper and registering the apiary and the hive (which would be illegal as it's incapable of being inspected) and providing annual disease returns for the control of AFB.

They will likely die from Varroa if left alone, but you will still have a huge mess to clean up.

At this stage (6 months) I suggest speaking to your home insurer first as removing the hive will likely cause damage to the wall.

John (Mr LydiaR).

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11 years 4 months ago #446073 by Hawkspur
Replied by Hawkspur on topic A question for beekeepers.
The suit and license I refer to is for the asbestos handling, not bee handling.
I agree about getting the comb and honey out of your walls, regardless of how much work it is to do it: your beautifully relined and painted walls won't last well with honey in them. Moisture, mould and smell.[B)]

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11 years 4 months ago #446100 by Stikkibeek
Reason tells me that if we can't get at them, then it would be best to let the bees eat their honey over the winter and then fumigate. Pity we can't tap the wall like one does to bleed maple syrup!

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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10 years 8 months ago #468096 by Stikkibeek
Our bees have gone. Over winter, we heard a rat gnawing in the wall where they were, so we don't know if the rat ate the queen and the hive collapsed, or, the hive swarmed, or, some other disaster befell them.
One thing is for sure we will have to block up the entrance to the hive to prevent them returning. There is likely to be a smell of honey in the wall, despite the rat eating royally. There are still bees about as there are a few that seem to like drowning themselves in a bucket of water I keep for the goat, near her house.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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10 years 8 months ago #468109 by Hawkspur
Replied by Hawkspur on topic A question for beekeepers.
Well, rats do serve a purpose! I hope it ate everything up for you.[;)]

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10 years 8 months ago #468132 by Deanna
Replied by Deanna on topic A question for beekeepers.
Well I hope they are all gone. Bees are thirsty at the moment and need safe places to land to drink. Good luck blocking the hole, or holes!

25 acres, 1400 Blue Gums, Wiltshire sheep, 5 steers, 2 cows, ducks, chickens, bees, dog, cats, retired, 1 husband and 3 grandkids.

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