A question for beekeepers.

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10 years 2 months ago #31312 by Stikkibeek
Can you lure a hive of bees out of their chosen place and into a hive? Have a colony established in the corner of the house and would like them out of there. And no, it is not an option to pull off the cladding on that corner as it's an old pattern fibrolite that will not only be asbestos based, but is irreplaceable. I don't want to poison the bees either.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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10 years 2 months ago #421065 by LongRidge
I strongly suspect that you can't. Can you get to them from the inside of the house? Because you are not miticiding the bees, they will be killed by varroa fairly soon.

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10 years 2 months ago #421068 by Valmai
Replied by Valmai on topic A question for beekeepers.
Look up Beekeepers in the phone book. If it can be done they would know how to do it.

Carbon-based biological unit.

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10 years 2 months ago #421072 by BlueSkyBee
Your best chance is to find the queen and install her and a nucleus of bees where you want them, not too far away.

But yeah, call a local beekeeper.



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10 years 2 months ago #421073 by muri
Replied by muri on topic A question for beekeepers.
An interesting problem, when most bee keepers are struggling to keep their bees alive.
I have heard a theory that the foundation that is put in hives which is ready made for the bees [thats the waxy substance that allows them to make the honeycomb where they lay their eggs and deposit honey] is not what they would use in nature and changes their breeding habits so the larvae hatch on the same cycle as the varroah.
I am not sure if this is correct or not. It would make wild bees less prone to the mite if it is true.
The only way I could think of is starting up some kind of smell that would move them on, but not sure what that would be. Smoke will calm them but wont make them go away
There might be away of making their exit point a one way trip out but not back in but dont ask me how.
As suggested, the bee club would be a starter otherwise you will be dealing with a pest company which would be a real pity,
Bees need all the help they can get, and there was an article in the auckland herald was it last weekend about the damage being done to bees by pesticides. They are dying out in some countries with really bad ramifications for the agricultural and horticultural sectors

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10 years 2 months ago #421089 by Stikkibeek
There were a stroppy group of bees in there about two years ago, and they disappeared which made me think varroa got them. However, due to the nature of the site they chose, it was not possible to remove the honey, so, the smell has indubitably lured a new group which has taken over and they are very docile....I understand it is the queen that determines this....... Not helped either by them being on the second storey.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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10 years 2 months ago #421193 by Kiwi303
Replied by Kiwi303 on topic A question for beekeepers.
Set up a hive with honey in for them to find nearby, then a couple of days later stick the vaccum cleaner in reverse and poke it in and ruffle them up, leave it running until they give up and move out.

You can't LURE them out, you have to drive them out, constant smoke, or moist air or other un-live-with-able nusinces would do it, but until they move they will be very upset bees.

You Live and Learn, or you don't Live Long -anon

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10 years 2 months ago #421200 by Simkin
Replied by Simkin on topic A question for beekeepers.
There are methods of luring a queen bee out of her hive so that the bees will follow her. I've only read about it and don't remember the details. It needs to be done by someone with experience and the best starting point is, as already suggested, your local beekeepers club.

Muri - we had 4 hives on our property when varroa struck. 1 x wild hive in an old willow and 3 hives with frames provided. The wild hive was gone quickly and due to me not knowing that varroa was already in our area I lost 2 of my 3 hives. 2 weeks from buzzing with bees to dead. One hive survived and was treated. What you mean may be drone frames. Foundation for drone brood which is a bit bigger than worker bee brood can be purchased. Varroa prefers drone brood as drones need longer to develop.

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10 years 2 months ago #421201 by Kiwi303
Replied by Kiwi303 on topic A question for beekeepers.
Oh yeah, and the wax brood/varroa lifecycle debate is along the lines of natural wax cells are smaller, hived bees build cells to the size of the foundation which are larger to allow more honey per cell, less cells per frame and a better honey to wax ratio. or just the size the first inventer made and copied ever since. Depending on which conspiricy theorist you listen to. Bee larvae grow to fill the cell, larger cells mean a slightly longer growth period, and commeasurate longer pupation, matich varroa cycles. Wild bees are thought to grow up and move out from the smaller wild cells before the varroa fully cycle and so don't die in the cell as happens from over-sucking by varroa in the domestic hives.

You Live and Learn, or you don't Live Long -anon

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10 years 2 months ago #421220 by Simkin
Replied by Simkin on topic A question for beekeepers.
So why are all the wild hives gone then???

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10 years 2 months ago #421240 by lydiar
Replied by lydiar on topic A question for beekeepers.
I'm a member of Franklin Beekeepers Club and have lots of experience collecting swarms (6 since October).

It's always difficult when the bees are in a wall, not least because of liability issues. If you cannot get to them, you can use a Bee Escape (a one way valve for bees) which will get about 75% of the bees out of the hive. The other 25% including the queen won't leave the brood.

Some beekeepers have a Bee-Vac which is a modified vacuum cleaner but even these need a fair bit of access to the actual frames of honey.

The best best may be to get a beekeeper to supply a nucleus of bees (including a queen) which is placed right next to the "hole in the wall" which is covered with a Bee Escape.

The only option (without opening up the wall) for the other 25% of the bees is probably fumigation - This is for two reasons: The remaining bees will likely be enough to build numbers back up (especially if the location is warm or insulated for winter) and if they naturally leave, the scent of beeswax will liekly attract a new swarm in the future where fumigation taints the smell and bees won't come back.

PM me if you need any more info or visit http://sites.google.com/site/franklinbeekeepersclub/student-of-the-month

John (Mr LydiaR)

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9 years 6 months ago #445647 by Aquila
Replied by Aquila on topic A question for beekeepers.
I know this is an old post but here's some advice for the next person.

Lemongrass oil replicates the queen bee pheromone and may lure the bees out but then you have to figure out what to do with them. Normally they'd be lured into a box which is then put into a hive and as long as you have the queen, the bees will set up house.

Jump on NZbees.net.nz and put a post up there. Plenty of beekeepers from all around the country that just love free bees.

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9 years 6 months ago #445863 by Stikkibeek
The bees are still very active, and still entrenched in the wall. I must say they are the quietest bees I have seen for a long time. A bee keeper told me, that the lighter the colour, the quieter the breed. Darker coloured bees are the most likely to be stroppy. Today in a howling gale, they were flying all around me and not interested in me in any way. We have seen heaps of activity in the red and white clover, the fruit trees, and the flower garden. Also unfortunately in the buttercup!

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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9 years 6 months ago #445869 by Aquila
Replied by Aquila on topic A question for beekeepers.
Which part of are you in?

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk 2

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9 years 6 months ago #445915 by Hawkspur
Replied by Hawkspur on topic A question for beekeepers.
If you don't want to touch the fibrolite, can you come at it from the other side: take off the wall lining?

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