Kaimanawa becomes pony of the year

More
12 years 2 months ago #31170 by muri
I am a bit slow on the news but very heartening to see a Kaimanawa made Pony of the Year at the HOY show.- 'Watch Me Move
Great effort, just shows the potential of these tough sure footed ponies

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
12 years 2 months ago #419373 by Cinsara
It was brilliant wasn't it, the rider is going to look at a pony the trust has just brought up to Glenbrook and the Wilson sisters are coming to look as well. What a difference a couple of people in the spotlight will make to the breed.

>

Save the Earth... it's the only planet with chocolate!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
12 years 2 months ago #419447 by kindajojo
They are great little ponies Iwonder what would happen if a larger stallion was released ie an irish draft/clyde to give them a bit of height ...make brilliant sport horses/hunters

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
12 years 2 months ago #419481 by Cinsara

kindajojo;416556 wrote: They are great little ponies Iwonder what would happen if a larger stallion was released ie an irish draft/clyde to give them a bit of height ...make brilliant sport horses/hunters

Big foals, hard birthing, lots of dead combos I would think. People have/will be crossing them for size, hopefully they have the vets number on speed dial.

>

Save the Earth... it's the only planet with chocolate!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
12 years 2 months ago #419945 by GloPony
Goodness Cinsara! You make it sound disasterous! Which of course it's generally NOT!

You'll note that some of the larger Kaimanawas that come out of musters have a good dose of Clydesdale in them. They tend to be the ones closest to the neighbouring stations.

There are plenty of people crossing them with TB's for the perfect eventer too. Not to mention all of the Standardbred, Stationbred, QH & Arab crosses that are all over the place either...

Horses respond a little differently when it comes to breeding compared to many other animals. They can often cope just fine with foaling a foal from a larger sire.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
12 years 2 months ago #419958 by muri
Actually, the mare we got from the 2000 muster was very much clydie.
As were many of the foals that came out that year
We picked her up from the muster point before the trucks went out so I had a chance to sight all the foals.
Big boned and white faces compared with the exmoor type we had got earlier.
I asked a judge once at a show what he thought her breeding could be and he said definitely clydie based on her movement.
She was about 14hh fully grown but outwalked my sons free moving 16hh Thoroughbred no problems

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
12 years 2 months ago #419968 by Cinsara

GloPony;417113 wrote: Goodness Cinsara! You make it sound disasterous! Which of course it's generally NOT!

I think the poster suggested realeasing a large stallion into the wild herd, in which case I stand by my horror story. Yep the bigger horses may cope ok but the tiddlers would just be a statistic - if anyone ever found their bones. The bigger horses to come out of the musters are merely the survivors.

>

Save the Earth... it's the only planet with chocolate!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
12 years 2 months ago #419977 by GloPony
There are some larger (15hh+) ones around the place already. Chloe's foal (mustered in utero 2010) is currently matching her purpose bred eventer in height & he is supposed to mature around 16.3hh. [:0]

Cinsara, really? Honestly, how much time have you spent tramping around out there looking at the variance in the bands & stepping over dead horse bones? :rolleyes: There have been bigger stallions in & out of the peripherals for YEARS!

The size of the mare tends to determine the birth size of the foal, unlike many other species. 'A' stallion introduced would only be breeding with 'his' mares (maybe 8 - 12 at absolute best but more likely, 2 or 3) anyway, assuming he was clever enough to earn any mares at all & keep them. Personally, I think any domestic PB Clydie or ID stallion probably wouldn't last long out there & would be unlikely to get within cooee of any mares. The crossbred Stationbreds are a bit different to a purebred.

It's all VERY hypothetical anyway as the chances of any stallions being released into the herd is a confirmed nil but Kaimanawas have definitely been crossed with stallions much larger than them quite successfully, in domestic homes.

Although I'm not a fan of breeding them at ALL, I still think it's unfair to misinform people. Although I wouldn't recommend putting a huge stallion over a tiny maiden mare, it's unlikely to result in the carnage you're portraying, within the wild population.

The foal mortality rate is very low compared to decades ago & Kaimanawa mares generally foal quite easily. Hence the 25% population increase per annum. They've obviously survived conceiving & foaling out large foals in the past given the bone & height on some foals & the obvious Clydie lineage so I doubt a well chosen Clydie or ID would create huge mortality all of a sudden now (not counting their own).

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
12 years 2 months ago #420138 by Cinsara

GloPony;417146 wrote: t's all VERY hypothetical anyway .

and yet you still feel the need to argue lol :rolleyes:

>

Save the Earth... it's the only planet with chocolate!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
12 years 2 months ago #420145 by GloPony
Damn straight I do! :p

After nearly two decades promoting 'factual' information about these horses, I find it really discouraging when I read & hear things being spouted that just aren't true. So yes, I do feel the need to correct the myths & wives tales that surround these horses! There is just SO MUCH of it & quite often, the culprits are those who have direct access to the correct information. [;)]

In some cases, it's people's misconstrued beliefs that have prevented them from applying for Kaimanawas & horses have paid for someone's careless 'mouthing off', with their lives.

'Correct' information is readily available through a variety of sources (DoC, KHH, Massey Uni, etc) & I would MUCH rather people pointed others in the direction of that, than make forthright statements about something they simply have no knowledge or experience of. :(

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
12 years 2 months ago #420160 by Cinsara
Don't be such a diva GP and down right bloody rude, honestly!!!!!

GloPony;417333 wrote: In some cases, it's people's misconstrued beliefs that have prevented them from applying for Kaimanawas & horses have paid for someone's careless 'mouthing off', with their lives.

Animals pay with their lives for your food everyday, over sensationalising a situation and "mouthing off", does just as much harm to a cause IMO.

A big stallion over a small maiden yearling IS going to cause foaling problems in any number of cases, whether they're Kais or Dartmoor ponies is irrelevant. There are thousands of horse skeletons on the ranges, the fact that you haven't "stepped over" every one of them doesn't make them any the less real lol. I know you've worked hard for decades yadda yadda yadda but this isn't a slang off at Kais, you are the only one making it so.
I foaled on a very large horse stud for a few seasons, and no small framed maiden filly had an easy time of foaling and more than a handful had a dam hard job of it. Some didn't survive even with all the vet care we had at hand, and they were in lovely safe, sheltered foaling paddocks.

>

Save the Earth... it's the only planet with chocolate!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.190 seconds