Is New Zealand like this?

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12 years 1 month ago #416673 by Blueberry
Replied by Blueberry on topic Is New Zealand like this?

RhodeRed;413458 wrote: .
Basically it went along the tune of "mathematics is not black and white and there are no set solutions, results are correct on the basis of group consensus and may not always be consistant ... blah blah blah."

Basically in entireity it was groupthink politics, if the group say 2+2=5 then 5 is the answer. Bare in mind this was a primary teaching guide resource - we aren't talking university level quantum mechanic "rarified-air" mathematics or anything complex. :rolleyes:


so, if everyone in the district agrees that a 5.8% rate rise means everyone pays $5.80 more rates, does that work as a consensus? :D :D

I think i could live with that[}:)]:o :D

[;)] Blueberry
treading lightly on mother earth

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12 years 1 month ago #416678 by stephclark
scary rhode red...basically the ' give them bread and circus's' mentality of government..

the peasants are happy and never question if they are fed and entertained..thats where cr*p tv and mcdonalds comes in..

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12 years 1 month ago #416688 by RhodeRed
Replied by RhodeRed on topic Is New Zealand like this?

stephclark;413466 wrote: scary rhode red...basically the ' give them bread and circus's' mentality of government..

the peasants are happy and never question if they are fed and entertained..thats where cr*p tv and mcdonalds comes in..


Pretty much it Steph.
Change "Bread and Circus" for "Beer and Rugby" and you are getting closer to the truth. :)

Heres a piece of the preface to the book if anyone is interested.
Its been released freely on the net now by the author with her consent to circulate it so theres no copyright issue.

Charlotte Iserbyts The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America wrote:

In 1973 I started the long journey into becoming a “resister,” placing the first incriminating piece of paper in my “education” files. That first piece of paper was a purple ditto sheet entitled “All About Me,” next to which was a smiley face. It was an open-ended questionnaire beginning with: “My name is _____.” My son brought it home from public school in fourth grade. The questions were highly personal; so much so that they encouraged my son to lie, since he didn’t want to “spill the beans” about his mother, father and brother.

The purpose of such a questionnaire was to find out the student’s state of mind, how he felt, what he liked and disliked, and what his values were. With this knowledge it would be easier for the government school to modify his values and behavior at will—without, of course, the student’s knowledge or parents’ consent.

That was just the beginning. There was more to come: the new social studies textbook World of Mankind. Published by Follett, this book instructed the teacher how to instill humanistic (no right/no wrong) values in the K–3 students. At the text’s suggestion the teacher was encouraged to take little tots for walks in town during which he would point out big and small houses, asking the little tots who they thought lived in the houses: Poor or Rich? “What do you think they eat in the big house? ...in the little house?”

When I complained about this non-educational activity at a school board meeting I was dismissed as a censor and the press did its usual hatchet job on me as a misguided parent. A friend of mine—a very bright gal who had also lived abroad for years—told me that she had overheard discussion of me at the local co-op. The word was out in town that I was a “kook.” That was not a “positive response/reward” for my taking what I believed to be a principled position.

Since I had not been “trained,” I was just mad!

Next stop on the road to becoming a “resister” was to become a member of the school philosophy committee. Our Harvard-educated, professional change agent superintendent gave all of the committee members a copy of “The Philosophy of Education” (1975 version) from the Montgomery County schools in Maryland, hoping to influence whatever recommendations we would make.

(For those who like to eat dessert before soup, read the entry under 1946 concerning
Community-Centered Schools: The Blueprint for Education in Montgomery County,Maryland. This document was in fact the “Blueprint” for the nation’s schools.)

When asked to write a paper expressing our views on the goals of education, I wrote that, amongst other goals, I felt the schools should strive to instill “sound morals and values in the students.”

The superintendent and a few teachers on the committee zeroed in on me, asking “What’s the definition of ‘sound’ and whose values?”

After two failed attempts to get elected to the school board, I finally succeeded in 1976 on the third try. The votes were counted three times, even though I had won bya very healthy margin!



My experience on the school board taught me that when it comes to modern education, “the end justifies the means.” Our change agent superintendent was more at home with a lie than he was with the truth. Whatever good I accomplished while on the school board—stopping the Planning, Programming and Budgeting System (PPBS) now known as Total Quality Management (TQM) or Generally Accepted Accounting Procedures/Generally Accepted Federal Funding Reporting (GAAP/GAFFR), getting values clarification banned by the board, and demanding five (yes, 5!) minutes of grammar per day, etc.—was tossed out two weeks after I left office.

Another milestone on my journey was an in-service training session entitled “Innovations in Education.” A retired teacher, who understood what was happening in education, paid for me to attend.

This training program developed by Professor Ronald Havelock of the University of Michigan and funded by the United States Office of Education taught teachers and administrators how to “sneak in” controversial methods of teaching and “innovative” programs. These controversial, “innovative” programs included health education, sex education, drug and alcohol education, death education, critical thinking education, etc.

Since then I have always found it interesting that the controversial school programs are the only ones that have the word “education” attached to them! I don’t recall—until recently—”math ed.,” “reading ed.,” “history ed.,” or “science ed.”

A good rule of thumb for teachers, parents
and school board members interested in academics and traditional values is to question any subject that has the word “education” attached to it.

This in-service training literally “blew my mind.” I have never recovered from it. The presenter (change agent) taught us how to “manipulate” the taxpayers/parents into accepting controversial programs. He explained how to identify the “resisters” in the community and how to get around their resistance.

He instructed us in how to go to the highly respected members of the community—those with the Chamber of Commerce, Rotary, Junior League,

Little League, YMCA, Historical Society, etc.—to manipulate them into supporting the controversial/non-academic programs and into bad-mouthing the resisters. Advice was also given as to how to get the media to support these programs.

I left this training—with my very valuable textbook,

The Change Agent’s Guide to Innovations in Education, under my arm—feeling very sick to my stomach and in complete denial over that in which I had been involved.

This was not the nation in which I grew up; something seriously disturbing had happened between 1953 when I left the United States and 1971 when I returned.

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12 years 3 weeks ago #419957 by igor

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12 years 3 weeks ago #420019 by highgirl
Replied by highgirl on topic Is New Zealand like this?

mikethebike;413395 wrote: ("In year 10, only 13 per cent identified yoghurt as a plant product") since when has milk been a plant? unless you count strawberry yogurt maybe??

Ahh... whoops, I read it the same way as you and was confused [;)] Now I've reread it I understand :)

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12 years 3 weeks ago #420020 by highgirl
Replied by highgirl on topic Is New Zealand like this?

igor;413448 wrote: Just remembered Richard Scarry's childrens books "Busy Busy World" and "What Do People Do All Day". One of these describes the processing of cotton from picking to clothes.

Loved those books [;)] I still have mine but they are too treasured to let my kids get their hands on!

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12 years 3 weeks ago #420025 by Ashlee
Replied by Ashlee on topic Is New Zealand like this?

igor;413354 wrote: www.stuff.co.nz/world/australia/6522766/...lias-cultural-cringe

I fear that our own population are becoming a bit the same.


Sad but true and it will only get worse.
New Zealand is one of the most urbanised countries in the world by population. Did you know that the National Institute of Demographic and Economic Analysis predicts a NZ population of 15 million by 2060...?

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12 years 3 weeks ago #420041 by Scuba_Steve

Blueberry;413368 wrote: 'fraid so! :(

Selling at the local Farmers Market, I am asked a lot of questions by prospective customers - some of them quite frankly astounding in their ignorance. :confused:
I, in turn, amaze a lot of people with statements like;
- eggs are a seasonal product
- you only need flour, salt and water to make bread
- not all plants grow in the same soil
- and, not to forget; Blueberries do not grow year-round...

it's not that they are 'thick' - a lot of people are so far removed from the origins of what they put into their mouths, they have no clue what the single ingredients actually look like, or where they come from. Or if they need to be in there, for that matter[:(!]

Just be thankful we're not at the Americans "where does milk come from?" "milk comes from dairies" apparently a large percentage (think round 80%) think that shops produce milk, cows not required [V]

RhodeRed;413458 wrote: Deliberate dumbing down of our children.

This ladys book "The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America" has alot of parallels with NZ and AU schools.

School systems are a control system, they're purposely setup in a way to somewhat brainwash people & keep them "inline" so the Govt has control
America's system goes 1 step further & is setup to supply troops for their military (the war economy being a huge money bringer for the US). Their schools are just a feeder for the military.


Science is but an organized system of ignorance

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12 years 3 weeks ago #420093 by jeannielea
My grandchildren love Richard Scarry books too but ours are fallingto pieces from use! So imagine our delight when we found an omnibus edition recently with several of the books in one. Special price too! I think it was in paper plus.

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12 years 3 weeks ago #420210 by DiDi
Replied by DiDi on topic Is New Zealand like this?
I had a friend some years ago (lost touch) who was a Canadian English (subject) school teacher. When I returned to NZ, we used to write to each other. I can't tell you how horrified I was at her inability to spell (but content and intention was clear) as you would never have been able to teach in NZ with that level of English. Not even Primary school in the day - certainly not secondary school.

My biggest issue in NZ (just to open a can of worms) is the indoctrination of the younger generation (to me that is) re the Treaty of Waitangi and it still continues from trying to do this when my adult children were in Primary school. Now late 20's.

This affects all teaching in NZ from Primary, Secondary to University and now from what I was reading last night - your Local Council. Surely this country is multi cultural - not bi cultural?

This is not just about the schools. It is about dumbing down of the Media in all walks of life - reading, TV, mobile phones etc. Shocking. My generation are portrayed on chat rooms as the greedy old baby boomers. Where is the media that tells these selfish young prats about 22% interest rates, no childcare, no WFF, no interst free loans ( for my children) not to mention 68% tax rates. Surely someone has a duty to put this into perspective when our young ones are racing out borrowing at 95% for their first home based on mortgage payments being less than rent. Dear God. Look at history in this country. Oh that is right - that is not important. Yeah right!

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12 years 2 weeks ago #420223 by Andrea1
Replied by Andrea1 on topic Is New Zealand like this?

DiDi;417404 wrote: I had a friend some years ago (lost touch) who was a Canadian English (subject) school teacher. When I returned to NZ, we used to write to each other. I can't tell you how horrified I was at her inability to spell (but content and intention was clear) as you would never have been able to teach in NZ with that level of English. Not even Primary school in the day - certainly not secondary school.

Mostly, I agree with the gist of this thread. As for the above-referenced anecdote, could it just be a casual writing style when she was 'off-duty'? Unless it was hand-written (when typos can't be blamed), then she may just have been lazy when writing casually. I say this because my dad, a teacher of Spanish and English for 37 years, and THE Grammar Police when I was growing up, has reverted to the point where you might be forgiven if you thought he was retarded after you read some of his rambling missives to me. I find them hilarious, but also annoying, because sometimes I can't even understand them!

My children never got away with sloppy writing, and even their text messages contain complete sentences, including proper punctuation. Their friends think they're a bit odd.... :D :D :D [:0]:rolleyes:

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12 years 2 weeks ago #420232 by RhodeRed
Replied by RhodeRed on topic Is New Zealand like this?

Andrea;417419 wrote:
My children never got away with sloppy writing, and even their text messages contain complete sentences, including proper punctuation. Their friends think they're a bit odd.... :D :D :D [:0]:rolleyes:


Hell, I got that back at school, but now, worse - in an adult work environment nowdays.

If you can string two coherent sentences together or enunciate your thoughts accurately or even engage in a reasoned debate without resorting to jingoistic jon-campbell-isms then you are viewed as being abnormal.

Ultimate extension of what we and now our children are being programmed with/into is "China".
A country that David Rockerfeller (a social manipulator, internationalist, globalist banker and eugenicist) has previously praised in print as a fantastic social experiment with very promising results.

In China the population live in fear of the State.
They tend to despise their fellow countryman as something to be preyed upon for advantage and are universally dumbed down via their school systems and carefully conditioned hierarchical social environment.
That is what the social engineers want for our children.

They comprehend it will not be our generation that folds, they are counting on our children or our grandchildren being subverted into this maliable mass of entitled idiots they seek to control.

No there is no tinfoil hat necessary, if you actively seek out the information and commit to reading more than a TV guide its becomes abundantly clear that there is a crafted plan behind the shift in our communities.

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