Brush strokes in enamel paint - how to avoid?

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11 years 2 months ago #27077 by Andrea
I have spent the last 4 hours painting architrave and skirting. Started with clear, bare pine, painted with one-coat primer and then so far one coat of semi-gloss enamel. Waiting for it to dry. I used the correct brush for the job, according to label on brush and the 'expert' at paint centre. But even though each 2.4m length was done as quickly as I could so as not to 're-work' the paint, I still have brush strokes showing all over the place.

This is the first time I've done architrave painting from scratch, as in bare wood, and I am really not happy with the outcome so far. It isn't dry yet, just tacky, and the brush strokes still show. I have done plenty of painting in my lifetime, interior and exterior, but mostly walls, and my only experience helping my builder dad was priming architrave and skirting (miles of it!), but never the finish coat. I can see now that there is a level of expertise required, and seemingly I do not have it.

Any hints or advice for the final coat?

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11 years 2 months ago #374118 by mikethebike
yep andrea dont worry about it! its just that because you get up close and personal while you are doing it you know exactly where all the marks are think about a piece of architrave or painted wood else where in your house and try to recall any blemishes that you can i bet you cant think of any! now go and get up real close to the best bit you can find and i bet its not anything like perfect! so you see once you get used to it you wont notice any marks and the dust/ mud from the dog cat fur what ever will cover it any way, in any event who looks at architraves?

Mike and Suzi living the lifestyle in sunny central hawkes bay, Still loads of animals oh and we still have our Zebra truck.

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11 years 2 months ago #374119 by mikethebike
Oh and i use this same technique to help people with low self esteem they know every single blemish in their own personality but don't appreciate that most people don,t even notice so when you walk into a nicely decorated room you only see how beautiful it looks there are of course blemishes all over but what you see is the overall picture, which is beautiful,

Mike and Suzi living the lifestyle in sunny central hawkes bay, Still loads of animals oh and we still have our Zebra truck.

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11 years 2 months ago #374120 by Simkin
There are paints that 'make' brush strokes and paints that don't. Did you use Dulux water based enamel? If yes - that's the one that makes brush strokes and you can't avoid it happening. We actually got used to the look.

Taubmans doesn't make the brush strokes but then it doesn't cover nearly as well as the Dulux paint. Resene's water based enamel is in-between the two as far as I know.

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11 years 2 months ago #374121 by Hawkspur
Brush marks are very tricky to avoid. You need the brush to be loaded with just the right amount of paint, (dip about 1/3 of the bristles, and then drain the excess by lightly pressing the brush against the container).
Use the minimum number of strokes (1-2 apply it then a few to spread it evenly.) Finish with long light strokes, lifting lightly at the end of each stroke. Do not over brush especially water soluble paints, including water soluble enamels.
The quality of paint really matters, (how well it flows, how much "solids" it has in it), as does how quickly it dries, which depends on its type and its quality and the temperature.

Close the paint can when not getting paint out of it and work from another open container, to minimise skinning and thickening of the paint while you work.

A soft worn-in brush will be better to use than a new brush. They really feel much nicer to use. Longer bristles are better too.
I have even seen a new brush quickly worn in on a belt sander, but I am not sure I'd recommend it...[:0]

If all else fails try adding a little thinner, but this may not work.

Sand lightly between coats if there are strong bristle marks.

The higher the gloss level, the more the strokes will show.

For larger areas, apply by roller or spray, but that is no help for skirtings sorry!

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