Gas Bottle - Weights etc

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11 years 3 months ago #26870 by Toast
I have a medium sized gas bottle for my horse truck and this is what's written on it:

TW 6.2kg
EW 6.5kg
WC 11.7kg

Am I right that the empty weight is 6.5kg & the weight when it's full is 11.7kg? If so, what's the TW?

I used to know it all when I was using it regularly.

I can't remember when it was last filled & how much is likely to have been used. Don't like taking it to the service station, waiting in a queue & then finding it only needs $1 worth of gas. Can put it on the scales here & work out whether it needs to go for a re-fill.

Thanks.

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Toast is the best food in the world
Whisky is the best drink in the world

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11 years 3 months ago #372125 by Stikkibeek
Replied by Stikkibeek on topic Gas Bottle - Weights etc
If you weigh your bottle on the bathroom scales and deduct that from the loaded weight, you will know how much gas you have. Another way is to tip hot water down the side of the bottle and do the "cold line" test on the gas level. TW stands for tare weight if I remember rightly. So that's the empty weight. EW stands for equivalent weight. Maybe pertains to the rubbish that is left behind when the bottle is empty. You need to purge them occasionally.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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11 years 3 months ago #372126 by Kiwi303
Replied by Kiwi303 on topic Gas Bottle - Weights etc
Tare Weight = 6.2Kg thats the bottle weight

WC = Water capacity, in other words it can hold 11.7 litres since 1 litre weighs 1 Kg

EW I do not know... from the number, maybe Empty Weight? just in case the pump hand at the station doesn't know what a Tare weight is?

You Live and Learn, or you don't Live Long -anon

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11 years 3 months ago #372143 by Toast
Replied by Toast on topic Gas Bottle - Weights etc
PS - It also says: TP 3.75 MPA - not sure what that means.

Weighed it tonight & there are 9kg so I think we're safe for cups of tea prior to hunting (horses/hounds/hares) for the next few weeks.

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11 years 3 months ago #372146 by wyseyes
Replied by wyseyes on topic Gas Bottle - Weights etc
TP = test pressure, the maximum safe pressure it has been tested to.

I see you shiver in anticip......................................................................................ation

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11 years 3 months ago #372176 by Kiwi303
Replied by Kiwi303 on topic Gas Bottle - Weights etc
Test pressure is the hydrostatic testing pressure, that equates to 5/3rds of the working pressure.

3.75 MPA is 3.75 Megapascals, or 37.5 BAR, or 543psi (close enough to 550psi)

So the Working pressure it is rated to for continuous containment is 330psi or thereabouts.

To put it into perspective, my old 65 cubic foot low pressure steel SCUBA tanks from the 70's are rated to 2250 PSI working pressure and 1800 PSI working pressure respectively. An average modern tank is at 207 BAR or 232 BAR pressures, 3000PSI or 3500PSI and hold 80 to 100 compressed cubic feet of air.

You Live and Learn, or you don't Live Long -anon

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11 years 2 months ago #372193 by spoook
Replied by spoook on topic Gas Bottle - Weights etc
EW is empty weight, this weight includes the valve.
TW is the tank only
WC is the water capacity.

Easy to know gas weight with a 9kg, weigh cylinder, deduct the EW, this gives you gas weight. LPG is about .5 Kg per litre.

Now you just need to know what your appliance uses to see how long your gas will last. [;)]

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"You are responsible, forever, for what you have tamed"

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