Bird ID

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11 years 3 months ago #26661 by Ronney
Bird ID was created by Ronney
I'm fairly familiar with the birds that I have lived with in various bits of the NI but this one has me flummoxed. It could be because it's dead and not looking in the slightest bit natural but I can recognise a dead sparrow, shag, duck but I don't recognise this one.

I found it out in the middle of a clear paddock, close to water but nowhere near being in it. I've searched my books and have seen similar but not quite the same. From it's beak I would think a seabird, perhaps of the skua, crake or rail families but the beak is also similar to the Weka. I didn't think to measure it but it would be about the length of a keyboard. The top feathers were dark brownish and speckled (for want of a better word), the underbelly was white and the legs were white/creamish in colour.

It wasn't there last night but the heat is contributing to a rapid breakdown. However, I can take some more photo's in the morning before it becomes a melting blob.

Any ideas anyone?

Cheers,
Ronnie

Attached files [IMG]http://app.lifestyleblock.co.nz/images/converted_files/361592=7389-Bird 012.jpg[/img] [IMG]http://app.lifestyleblock.co.nz/images/converted_files/361592=7390-Bird 013.jpg[/img] [IMG]http://app.lifestyleblock.co.nz/images/converted_files/361592=7391-Bird 014.jpg[/img]

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11 years 3 months ago #369979 by Stikkibeek
Replied by Stikkibeek on topic Bird ID
That's a bittern......or what's left of it. I think that variety is the Australasian Bittern, as it is the bigger one. NZ Little bittern is much smaller and more mottled. Both quite rare and I think on the endangered list. They have a habit of standing very still with head an beak tilted up so they look like a bit of stick, if disturbed. makes them a target for larger predators like wild cats.


Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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11 years 3 months ago #369980 by Ronney
Replied by Ronney on topic Bird ID
Thankyou :) I looked really hard at the photo of the Australasian Bittern and decided that it probably wasn't it. Have now gone back to make another comparison and think that your are right. What a bummer. I've never, to the best of my knowledge, seen one of these birds and when I do, it's bloody well dead. I am assuming that it flew into the overhead power lines - I often find dead shags and herons that haven't got their navigational GPS quite right when it comes to power lines.

Interesting that my book says that the NZ Little Bittern is now extinct. Also interesting that the picture I have of the Australasian Bittern shows it as being much more mottled than the one in the paddock which is why I originally discounted it.

I didn't do the youtube link I'm afraid, one of the downsides of dial up is that one doesn't have a lifetime in reserve to wait for things to load :D

Cheers,
Ronnie

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11 years 3 months ago #369981 by Stikkibeek
Replied by Stikkibeek on topic Bird ID
They are quite interesting when they fly, as they are slow and look cumbersome. They hold/fold their head back a bit like a pelican does. so they seem much shorter when flying. We had a cat try to bring one in our window some years ago. Cat couldn't get off the ground and when cat was growled at he let the bittern go which stalked indignantly off into the dark, and back to hunting in the swamp no doubt.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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11 years 3 months ago #370103 by kaybe
Replied by kaybe on topic Bird ID
So the NZ Little Bittern wasn't extinct after all... but now it is. Sorry. Couldn't resist :-)

Ronney, is it too far gone to bag and freeze it? Some boffin might be interested to know if it was actually the NZ species...

Tomorrow is the day I will stop procrastinating.

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