Dumb question about batteries...

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13 years 9 months ago #23039 by kate
We have one of those 'expel' things to keep the flies away. It seemed to be running down so we bought new batteries. We put the new batteries in and...nothing [:0] We put the old batteries in and it worked. These are not cheap batteries [}:)]

So, my question is, what is the difference between 'alkaline' and other batteries and should it make a difference to this repel thing?

Cheers
Kate

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13 years 9 months ago #329704 by GrantK
Alkaline batteries are more suited for gadgets that require a large amount of current, usually for just a short time e.g. ghetto blasters, powered toys, etc.

For other things such as bug zappers which have a small but constant demand, the standard black batteries labelled as "heavy duty", or even the old red or blue Eveready batteries (if you can still find them) may be better. Try at the warehouse as they often have bargain basement batteries.

It is rare to find something that won't work with alkaline batteries, but I have heard of it before. The voltage is slightly different to the old-fashioned "dry cells" which are usually coloured black, red or blue.

Are the new batteries you bought (which didn't work) Duracell or Energizer? Or something else?

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13 years 9 months ago #329705 by kiwi_jon
Kate,

Alkaline batteries have a higher current capacity than normal batteries so should last longer. They also should have a longer shelf life. Apart from that there is no difference.

I know this is obvious but make sure you installed the batteries correctly.

You didn't by any chance buy rechargable batteries?

It is possible you bought a dud set of batteries. Take them back to the retailer.

I always buy batteries from a store that has a high turnover of batteries e.g supermarket not corner dairy.

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13 years 9 months ago #329709 by kate
Thanks guys :D

I think the batteries were duracell but I'm not sure where they've gone to (I blame Geoff, who bought them too and has now hidden them!)

We put them in about six times, Jon and they definitely weren't rechargable.

They're 'D' sized batteries so we don't have anything else to test them in. If they were 'AA' I have a million gadgets I could try :D

Cheers
Kate

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13 years 9 months ago #329725 by GrantK
Yep, Duracell are definitely alkaline and in "D" size they cost an absolute fortune.

Go to the warehouse and get some cheapie no-name ones and chances are they will work perfectly. Many torches take D size Kate -- have a closer look and you may find one to test them in; assuming you can find where Geoff has hidden them!

P.S. A while ago, we bought a 4-bay battery charger from DSE which caters for anything from AAA/A/C/D sizes. It is intended for rechargeables (obviously), but includes a Test function which works with any type of battery in the above sizes, and has been very handy on many occasions in just the situation you describe.

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13 years 9 months ago #329765 by sod
Kate when you are looking for dry cells check if any have a test trip with them, it is just a strip that you put onto each end of them and it tells you how charged they are we have some some where but I just use a multi meter as there are a few around here

Having time is a measure of enthusiasm:rolleyes:

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13 years 9 months ago #329768 by kate
Okay, they're Energizer batteries, not Duracell [:I] Our torches take all sorts of batteries but not D!! I have seen those packs with the testing strip sod, but this isn't one of them. I don't know how much luck we'll have trying to return them, who's to say they aren't the batteries we were replacing?

Annoying though...

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13 years 9 months ago #329769 by kiwi_jon

sod;316367 wrote: Kate when you are looking for dry cells check if any have a test trip with them, it is just a strip that you put onto each end of them and it tells you how charged they are we have some some where but I just use a multi meter as there are a few around here

Testing a battery with a multimeter is next to useless without the battery being on load. A dead battery will usually read the full voltage. It is only on a load that the battery voltage drops.

The battery tester strips have a load built in.

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13 years 9 months ago #329771 by kiwi_jon

Kate;316370 wrote: Okay, they're Energizer batteries, not Duracell [:I] Our torches take all sorts of batteries but not D!! I have seen those packs with the testing strip sod, but this isn't one of them. I don't know how much luck we'll have trying to return them, who's to say they aren't the batteries we were replacing?

Annoying though...

Kate,

Make sure that there is no corrosion on the battery contacts of the device you are using the batteries in. Sometime new/different batteries will make contact in a slightly different place on the terminals. A piece of fine sandpaper or failing that a fingernail file :D will clean up the contacts.

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13 years 9 months ago #329772 by GrantK

kiwi_jon;316371 wrote: Testing a battery with a multimeter is next to useless without the battery being on load.

Unless you have a decent multimeter with a 10A or 20A DC range.

It will quickly show up which batteries are good and which aren't :)

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13 years 9 months ago #329775 by kiwi_jon

GrantK;316374 wrote: Unless you have a decent multimeter with a 10A or 20A DC range.

It will quickly show up which batteries are good and which aren't :)

That reminds me, I must replace the 30A DC fuse in my multimeter.

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13 years 9 months ago #329792 by ame

GrantK;316374 wrote: Unless you have a decent multimeter with a 10A or 20A DC range.

It will quickly show up which batteries are good and which aren't :)

How so?

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13 years 9 months ago #329795 by GrantK
A fresh "D" size battery will produce a peak discharge current of one Amp or more, whereas a discharged one will produce less than 100mA, falling quickly after that.

Auto electricians use a similar tool for testing car batteries, as shown on this page:

www.ariestools.com.sg/Battery%20&%20Elect%20Circuit.htm


Battery Power/High Discharge tester



  • Load Test Batteries on or off vehicles quickly


  • Charging system testing ability


  • Up to 100 amp loading capability


  • Safety switch prevents sparking


  • Heavy duty plated case and clamps


  • Suitable for most 6/12volt car/van lead/acid batteries



Live weather data and High/Low records for our farm at: www.keymer.name/weather

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13 years 9 months ago #329813 by sod
Thanks Grant we use a battery/charge tester on our cars etc. plus loaded amp meter

Having time is a measure of enthusiasm:rolleyes:

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