scanning negatives to digital

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14 years 3 weeks ago #323513 by Westie
Oh, hey what is good for cleaning up old slides without wrecking them anyone?
So fragile and precious I haven't touched them for fear of making them worse...but I do have a few of the same age etc to practice on.

What's that I just stepped in?

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14 years 3 weeks ago #323520 by Pyewacket

ame;309409 wrote: Here are three more that work using a slide projector (not negatives):

hackaday.com/2009/12/01/slide-digitizer/
patenteux.com/SlideDuplication/index.html
carlhutzler.com/blog/2009/01/22/camera-s...ng-your-35mm-slides/

Gosh, I was reading about that sort of thing more than 20 years ago, when I used to develop my own photos! [:I] I was always being given ancient, usually damaged, family photos and was asked to copy them. I used to project slides and photograph them, because I didn't have the money to buy a slide copier.

These days, I will only photograph a photograph if I have no choice. My preferred method is a scanner.

In my opinion, you should use whatever you have to hand. If it's a point and shoot, then so be it. If you can stretch to a flatbed scanner with a light lid attachment for negatives and slides, great. You can get a very good result with a decent flatbed scanner and good photo editing software.

Best to buy a CCD scanner rather than a CIS scanner, though. PB Tech have a very reasonably priced CCD model with a light lid for under $112. I use one to scan photographs and images as part of my work and I have no complaints about the quality. Customers are impressed, too!

PG, as you're local, if you want to try it out, give me a call. You're welcome to have a go and see if it would suit you!
Kim.

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14 years 3 weeks ago #323526 by Pumpkingirl

Pyewacket;309424 wrote: You're welcome to have a go and see if it would suit you!
Kim.

Kim, you're a darling, I'd love to, that's certainly a lot cheaper! As the family archivest I've been researching scanners a bit, as we're talking about massive amounts of photos, so something that does high quality images and quickly is my goal.

Are you guys around over Easter? Could I drop by at a time/day that suits if so?

I guess knowing a little about images, I want to make sure that the photos are protected - the ones of my childhood are starting to deteriote very quickly - and I also want any future family members to be able to blow them up or do whatever they like, so I don't want to limit them by doing shoddy work now, if you know what I mean.

Having done my own slightly amateur point and shoot it's not satisfactory to me, and it's very slow. Having technology help me would save me a lot more time than the capital investment in the scanner.

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14 years 3 weeks ago #323532 by skyline_glenn
Thanks for the replies. I already have a flatbed scanner but unfortuntely it doesn't have a light hood. The digitek negtive/slide scanner is $109 from jaycar so is looking like a good option, my only concern is whether the 1600dpi resolution is going to be good enough to reprint the photos in 8x10 or 10x12.

Glenn
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14 years 3 weeks ago #323534 by Pumpkingirl

skyline_glenn;309436 wrote: TMy only concern is whether the 1600dpi resolution is going to be good enough to reprint the photos in 8x10 or 10x12.

That was one of the things I was concerned about too, although obviously with only family prints we'd never blow an image up to that size. From what I have read (and I now can't find the article, sorry), 1600dpi is fairly good quality, but really good quality is 2000-4000dpi.

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14 years 3 weeks ago #323535 by Stikkibeek

As the family archivest I've been researching scanners a bit, as we're talking about massive amounts of photos, so something that does high quality images and quickly is my goal.

And as a family archivist you may also end up with letters or family documents also needing to be copied, so scanning is also an option for these, either as jpegs, or as documents via textbridge or similar.

Did you know, that what you thought I said, was not what I meant :S

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14 years 3 weeks ago #323536 by Pyewacket

Pumpkingirl;309430 wrote: ...Are you guys around over Easter? Could I drop by at a time/day that suits if so?

We are around over Easter. In fact, my project this Easter is to scan old photos, so we'd be delighted to see you.

Kim.

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14 years 3 weeks ago #323541 by GrantK

skyline_glenn;309436 wrote: The digitek negtive/slide scanner is $109 from jaycar so is looking like a good option, my only concern is whether the 1600dpi resolution is going to be good enough to reprint the photos in 8x10 or 10x12.

Pumpkingirl;309438 wrote: That was one of the things I was concerned about too, although obviously with only family prints we'd never blow an image up to that size. From what I have read (and I now can't find the article, sorry), 1600dpi is fairly good quality, but really good quality is 2000-4000dpi.

1600dpi will be plenty for scanning old photos. At that resolution, you will almost certainly be able to make out the graininess of the original film and developing process. If the photos were printed with a matte finish rather than gloss, it will show that up too, so you may need to use some filters in photoshop to clean it up a bit.

Scanning slides or negatives is a different ballgame, needing much higher resolution. I have seen this type of scanner made by Agfa with up to 9600dpi resolution. Hopefully, the Digitek scanner from Jaycar will be up to the job. It's certainly cheap enough, so well worth a try IMO.

This looks like the scanner of choice for working with 35mm negatives or slides:

www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?item=SCAPTK2544

At $483, it isn't cheap though!

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14 years 3 weeks ago #323544 by ame
Replied by ame on topic scanning negatives to digital

skyline_glenn;309436 wrote: Thanks for the replies. I already have a flatbed scanner but unfortuntely it doesn't have a light hood. The digitek negtive/slide scanner is $109 from jaycar so is looking like a good option, my only concern is whether the 1600dpi resolution is going to be good enough to reprint the photos in 8x10 or 10x12.

Ok. On the Jaycar website the resolution is quoted as 1800dpi. Let's assume that is the native optical resolution. A 35mm slide is 24mm x 36mm (about 1"x1.5"), so you will get an image about 1800x2700 pixels. This is about 5 MegaPixels, so the little Jaycar box will give you the same kind of image as a 5Mp camera.

A reasonable resolution for printing is 300dpi, so an 8"x10" print would require 2400x3000 pixels. As you can see, the image would probably be adequate for this purpose. Even printing at 10x12 would probably be ok, especially since larger photos are viewed from a longer distance. If you already tried printing something from a 5Mp camera onto this size then you should know what to expect.

It is very likely that all that's in the Jaycar box is a translucent backlit panel and a cheap 5Mp webcam and lens.

A

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