New sheep keepers

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5 years 8 months ago #540431 by BenH86
New sheep keepers was created by BenH86
Hi,

We are just started our lifestyle live. We got 1 ram and 4 sheep form a nearby farmer. He could not control them so the are used to free range on his farm.
All was ok till 2 days ago, one of the ewes is pregnant (probably twins or more) and started to be very lazy. we suspected Ketosis en started threatening her for Milk fever and ketosis. She responded to Ketol and a calcium injection and it looked like she was getting better but last night she was down and could not get back up her feet on her own. She still reacts on almost everything that goes on in the paddock but she just has a very hard time standing up right. ones you help her back on her feet she is trying to run away but you can see she barely holds the extra weight.
Does anyone have tips for us as we are out of ideas.

Also in cause of, does anyone know a dead live stock collection service in Taranaki as we only have 1,5 acres we don't really want to bury her on our property in cause off.

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5 years 8 months ago #540434 by Ruth
Replied by Ruth on topic New sheep keepers
Please call a vet. She may still be able to be saved. What you've done sounds pretty good but if you've run out of treatment options, you need expert advice - and on welfare grounds either need to finish her suffering or relieve it.

Your language is entertaining. What's your native language? Or have you a slightly-dodgy voice-to-text translator? :D

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5 years 8 months ago #540437 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic New sheep keepers
Yes, call your vet. When sheep are pregnant their auto-immune systems reduces working, so the pregnancy and the Sleepy Sickness may have caused an infection that would respond to antibiotics. The vet will want to know how old she is, so lift her lips and count the big teeth.
Good luck. I have very little success curing Sleepy Sickness :-(.

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5 years 8 months ago #540438 by Ronney
Replied by Ronney on topic New sheep keepers
Hi Ben and welcome,
I don't wish to be a misery but the chances are that you will lose this ewe. Certainly call your vet immediately and if the worst comes to the worst, they may be able to help you save the lambs with some quick work.

In the meantime, shift your remaining ewes to the best paddock you have, particularly if you feel others may be carrying multiples.

Good luck,
Cheers, Ronnie

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5 years 8 months ago #540446 by BenH86
Replied by BenH86 on topic New sheep keepers
Hi Ronnie,

Thanks for your reply.
The vets in our region don’t know a lot about sheeps. They only treat cows. The vet came to have a look and give her an other shot of calcium and advices to keep treating with Ketol till she gets back up or the lambs come out. If she gets worse we have to call again to put her asleep.

Any experience with Vigest, will that help her to get some more nutrition in her body and get her appetite back

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5 years 8 months ago #540448 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic New sheep keepers
I have been told by our vets that Ketol is better for Sleepy Sickness than Vigest is, but .... Vigest is much better than nothing.
She needs to be lifted as often as you can, but the wool will start breaking off soon so you will have to use a method other than by pulling her up by the wool. Try to forcefeed her clean, mid-length say 10 cm, cut grass. If she will eat pellets or meal then that would help her. Also chopped apples and clover or lucerne hay., which will also probably need to be forcefed.

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5 years 8 months ago #540452 by BenH86
Replied by BenH86 on topic New sheep keepers
Thanks for your reply
At the moment we force feeding her with grass from the paddock. We also put her into ten shelter with a lot of hay. Will try Some apples this afternoon. She just has a problem starting to eat, as soon as you give her some bites she starts eating on her own.
She gets 120ml kettle spread out over the day. She looks a lot more mobile today but she has a habit of not showing anything when there is a vet around.
The vet gave her an dexamethason injection to speed up the labor and try to save at least the ewe, hopefully the lambs are strong enough to survive as well

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5 years 8 months ago #540462 by Ronney
Replied by Ronney on topic New sheep keepers
Hi again,
Stick with the Ketol - Vigest is good for lambs but Ketol is aimed at ketosis and this is what you're dealing with. You can also give glycerine or propylene glycol mixed with equal quantities of water - and Ketol has propylene glycol in it. Read this just for information: www.growsolutions.com.au/en/products/pro...s-details.php?id=726 .
Did the vet advise you to give it twice a day? If not, do so.

Are you set up for hand rearing lambs should this happen? If not, buy a couple of Pritchard lamb teats. These are, in my opinion, the best of what are available and I've used them for over 40 years. Find a vinegar bottle or one with the same size neck. Be ready to whip down to RD1 or similar to buy Anlamb and be equally prepared to milk out colostrum from the ewe whether she be dead or alive. Sorry to be blunt but that is the reality. All new borns NEED that colostrum. More on bottle feeding should you need to do it and I hope you don't.

Cheers,
Ronnie
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5 years 8 months ago #540467 by 16 Paws
Replied by 16 Paws on topic New sheep keepers
Hi Ben. Don't give up!!!! Keep going with the ketol, and calcium. Keep offering sheep nuts or other high calorie options. Keep her propped upright- hay bales can be useful for this. We had a ewe with sleepy sickness for a week before delivering 3 huge triplets, ( the first being breech, second sideways). All survived, although we only let her raise one lamb. She took some time to recover after delivery, did go sleepy a while after delivery. That took more ketol, calcium and antibiotic at that stage. That was two seasons ago. Last year she had twins successfully- no sleepy sickness. You have a chance of a good outcome, so good luck, and keep fighting for her.
A hint for a sheep that is mobile that needs to be caught repeatedly, that I've found useful, is to create a rope halter with a long trailing rope that you can grab, rather than trying to get close to a flighty sheep that has learned to be wary
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5 years 8 months ago #540485 by BenH86
Replied by BenH86 on topic New sheep keepers
Thanks for all your reply's.
The ewe is going strong at the moment. Its really hard to catch her to give her Ketol. she is running around but we havent seen her eating on her own yet. We think she does as the sheep nuts we p[ut in the paddock are finished in a couple of hours.
The lambs should be there any time soon, she is already producing milk and the vet told us its all looking much more promising at the moment. We'll just keep our fingers crossed all goes according to plan and that she will accept the lambs

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5 years 8 months ago #540487 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic New sheep keepers
If you cannot easily catch her then she is hugely improving. As recently stated, tying a 20 meters or so length of rope around her neck with a knot that won't slip makes catching much easier. Beware of hazards in the paddock that the rope can get caught on.
Do NOT milk her before the lambs have arrived. An indication of state of birth by udder size is highly inaccurate. Some ewes start rising 1 month before lambing and others 2 days after.
Unless her last lamb was weaned early December, I would not expect lambs yet unless there is a profundity gene in her. You could be waiting for 4 more weeks :-(.
If you want to raise a pet lamb, then prepare the bottle, teat, kitchen scales (I always weigh both powder and water on the same scales - the measuring device in the bag can be highly inaccurate).
Do not, ever, keep a ram lamb as a pet. Tame rams can be extremely dangerous so if your pet is male, get him castrated at the same time as he gets tailed.
A triplet ewe is likely to be far less fertile than a single ewe, especially from a mother that has been compromised during pregnancy. This is because fertility is hugely dependent on how well the animal was cared for by it's mother, especially before birth.
Multiple lambs are often different sizes, because of the attachment of the placenta to the uterus, or because of a twist in the umbilical. Murphy's Law means the big lamb will try to get out first, but will get stuck so compromising it's health. So if you have to help to get the first lamb out, remember to look for the second lamb before you let the ewe go.
And when the first lamb is small, always check for another lamb especially when the ewe has had Sleepy Sickness aka Twin Lamb Disease aka Pregnancy Toxaemia.
Good luck and I hope the wait is not too long :-)

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5 years 8 months ago #540502 by Ronney
Replied by Ronney on topic New sheep keepers
Ben, that sounds very promising and I'm glad to hear it. If she's out-racing you, she's well on the way.
As to the rest of it, one step at a time:)

Cheers,
Ronnie

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