hi from Whitford

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7 years 4 months ago #39172 by keeshhira
hi from Whitford was created by keeshhira
Hi, Loving this website, it's so helpful and easy to use. My wife and our 3 boys (10, 9 and 8) have just moved into a 5.5 acres lifestyle block in Whitford. Been here a week and, so far, loving it. We have a few sheep that (don't belong to us but) graze on our land. Should we be charging for this? Also looking to get some chickens (for eggs) - any ideas to which type of chickens to get (apparently there are a few varieties)? Thanks, Keesh.

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7 years 4 months ago #502456 by Ruth
Replied by Ruth on topic hi from Whitford
Whether you ask money for things or not depends upon the relationship you have with the people who are receiving such favours, I reckon. If you front up and ask for money, you might mess up the chance of developing such a relationship with someone really helpful.

Some people I charge for things I'd give to others for free - all depends on the attitude of entitlement which comes with some requests/demands! Other things it's simply a matter of people paying for things they'd expect to pay for because it's part of usual practice. If you were grazing 3000 sheep, yes; if it's half a dozen and they're helping keep your grass under control while you decide what to do, probably not.

Welcome to the forum. I hope you know who owns the sheep and what to watch for if you're supposed to be keeping an eye on them. :)

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7 years 4 months ago #502474 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic hi from Whitford
Welcome.
Sheep grazing is worth about $1 per head per week. That gives you about half the profit of the sheep, and the owner the other half. Your land may be able to comfortably run 10 sheep per year, so is worth about $520 to you (with no work needed) and a bit more perhaps to him but with quite some work involved at times. If you want to be bothered.

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7 years 4 months ago #502482 by muri
Replied by muri on topic hi from Whitford
I would look at it this way, if the sheep werent there, the grass would be long and un-useable and you would probably be wanting to pay someone to cut it which would be possibly costing you a few hundred dollars.
Once you have settled in and decided if you want to graze it yourself or not, or what you want to do with it long term, then talk to the owner of the sheep and come to some agreement. If they were my sheep, I would not find it economical to pay for grazing

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7 years 4 months ago #502501 by keeshhira
Replied by keeshhira on topic hi from Whitford
thanks for the replies. i'll probably not end up charging, as you say, they keep the grass (what little there is right now) tidy.

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7 years 4 months ago #502514 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic hi from Whitford
The other thing is that if the grass were not grazed it would soon become an extreme fire risk. At this time of the year, grass fires start incredibly easily, and if there is a bit of gorse around it will soon be out of control. Hence the need of good Public Liability Insurance.

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7 years 4 months ago #502518 by Deanna
Replied by Deanna on topic hi from Whitford
Hi and welcome keeshhira. Very exciting for you and yes this is a great site. As for chickens, this can depend if you are going to eat them as well as keep them for eggs. I would recommend the Barred Rock if eating them comes into your ideas. Otherwise Shaver or Hyliners, these are hybrids and don't live as long sometimes as other breeds as they are egg machines and can lay 6-7 eggs each a week when they aren't moulting and they are unlikely to go broody, another time they won't be laying. Have you thought about bees. All the best for you future.

25 acres, 1400 Blue Gums, Wiltshire sheep, 5 steers, 2 cows, ducks, chickens, bees, dog, cats, retired, 1 husband and 3 grandkids.

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7 years 4 months ago #502541 by Anakei
Replied by Anakei on topic hi from Whitford
[QUOTE=Deanna;50854 I would recommend the Barred Rock if eating them comes into your ideas. Otherwise Shaver or Hyline[/quote]
Plus a couple of Araucanas for the cool blue eggs :)

Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

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7 years 4 months ago #502560 by keeshhira
Replied by keeshhira on topic hi from Whitford
Thanks, I do eat meat, but i can't imagine eating the chickens afterwards as they'll be like pets. Thanks for the variety info.

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7 years 4 months ago #502625 by seatil
Replied by seatil on topic hi from Whitford
Lots of different chickens to choose from. While the hylines and shavers are the most prolific layers out there I find the eggs to be a bit bland. They're fine if you just want the most eggs for your buck, but if you want a bit more than that, then...

Most of the heavy heritage breed chooks produce a reasonable number of decent sized eggs per week and look absolutely stunning to boot! My favourite egg is laid by one of our orpington girls. Even in a blind taste test it wins by a mile over the shaver and hyline eggs.

Don't rule out the cross breeds (aka farmyard specials) either! There are some absolutely gorgeous one-of-a-kinds out there. I'm a bit of a sucker for frizzles -- chooks that are having a really bad hair day - and they come in large as well as bantam sized.

Ask the breeder how good at laying their birds are as there can be variability from strain to strain of the same breed.

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7 years 4 months ago #502626 by seatil
Replied by seatil on topic hi from Whitford

Anakei;508572 wrote: Plus a couple of Araucanas for the cool blue eggs :)

Not just Araucana! I breed large farmyard specials with blue and green eggs. They are very cool eggs. :)

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7 years 4 months ago #502661 by Anakei
Replied by Anakei on topic hi from Whitford

seatil;508669 wrote: While the hylines and shavers are the most prolific layers out there I find the eggs to be a bit bland. They're fine if you just want the most eggs for your buck, ...
.....................
My favourite egg is laid by one of our orpington girls. Even in a blind taste test it wins by a mile over the shaver and hyline eggs.

Really? Do you mean side by side comparison from hens living at the same place and fed the same food, or just a supermarket egg compared with home grown?
I've never had the 2 sorts side by side but I will never forget the first egg we cracked from our hylines that we kept in a chicken tractor on pasture. I had never seen a yolk so orange or tasted such a rich egg! I had planned to keep a couple of hylines/shavers for egg production and another large-breed flock for meat production, but I might have to rethink this if the hylines fail the taste test!:confused:

Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

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7 years 4 months ago #502662 by seatil
Replied by seatil on topic hi from Whitford

Anakei;508709 wrote: Really? Do you mean side by side comparison from hens living at the same place and fed the same food, or just a supermarket egg compared with home grown?

I collected eggs from our own chickens, all supplied with the same food, free ranging in the same space. All chooks had been there at least three months and were all in their first year of laying.

Two were from the same brown shaver, two from the same splash orpington and two from the same houdan.

Single blind taste test - as in the chef knew whose eggs were whose but the eaters didn't know - but all were cooked in the same way (scrambled with a dash of black pepper, no milk added, no water added).

The orpington was the clear winner with lots of comments about deep satisfying flavour. The brown shaver came a distant second (bland and boring, but edible), and the poor houdan came in third with comments of "ugh, tasted like water".

Give it a try some day! It was really fun tasting the different portions of eggs. Before doing it I had been telling myself that the nicer flavour was all in my head because surely an egg is an egg. Turns out that for our chooks that wasn't the case.

I've never had the 2 sorts side by side but I will never forget the first egg we cracked from our hylines that we kept in a chicken tractor on pasture. I had never seen a yolk so orange or tasted such a rich egg!

I would still rather have a home shaver/hyline egg over a supermarket egg! But the double orpy (name of the orpington) has set a high standard to beat!

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7 years 4 months ago #502706 by Anakei
Replied by Anakei on topic hi from Whitford
Amazing. I also thought an egg is an egg. Now I have to try this at home :D

Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

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