quick intro - new to NZ

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9 years 1 month ago #39041 by bees
quick intro - new to NZ was created by bees
Hi - probably doing an intro too early - havent read half the stuff on here yet! Me and my wife are moving to NZ - and have been amazed at the so called lifestyle properties available; we love them and want to buy one when we come. We are coming on a parent visa (all being well...) as our daughter married a kiwi (and my sister did years ago too and moved here - so I am almost a kiwi anyway....).
The question is - when it says "land has a few paddocks - ideal for sheep grazing etc..." what sort of income does/can this produce? full time occupation? part time? love to know if is an earner or just a labour of love. I hasten to point out there would be love in it even though I would have to learn from scratch. I am 51 but as fit as a fiddle...
Also the rules around building - if we wanted to have camping for guests and build a toilet block - how does that work? I stress we would only want to complement wherever we end up - not change it for profit. Thanks guys! (Also any general advice?!)

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9 years 1 month ago #501285 by katieb
Replied by katieb on topic quick intro - new to NZ
welcome, income of course depends on the size of the block, location, condition & all sorts of other things. You need a decent sized block to make a decent income if you are planning on making it off the animals.

take a look through past threads as its often been covered

Animals rule our place... cows, calves, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, donkeys, chickens, ducks... the list goes on
...."lifestyle block like" 25 or so acres around the house attached to a rather large farm with dairy drystock & a 600 cow dairy conversion :)....1500 acres to call home

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9 years 1 month ago #501292 by muri
Replied by muri on topic quick intro - new to NZ
Very few life style blocks are economically viable so if you are looking at living off the land and making a living off it you will either have to be very lucky, extremely well skilled, or have the most amazing soil that can make growing something relatively easy.
Our soils are very diverse and one cant really give a blanket answer to your questions that will cover the whole country. A few paddocks with grazing sheep will cost you to run probably rather than giving an income.
Building regulations can vary around the country so once again, its not possible to give a blanket answer. What is permitted on one piece of land may not be allowed on the neighbouring land, it will depend on the zoning, the location etc

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9 years 1 month ago #501294 by Mich
Replied by Mich on topic quick intro - new to NZ
Welcome to the forum, Bees. Nice to have you.

The answers to your questions depend a lot on many things: location, land, water availability, weather, council regulations to name a few. Bit like how long is a piece of string, really. :D

I wouldn't let a lack of experience be a concern. Many of us started with absolutely no experience, just a dream of a better life. What is more important, IMHO, is what you think you could have a passion for. Keeping and caring for animals, growing crops, becoming more self-sufficient, just enjoying creating a natural environment for flora and fauna, all of these or a combination to name a few. How far from city amenities do you want to be? Do you want an easy care place that frees you up to travel and do other things? Or do you want to be heavily involved in looking after your land on a daily basis (it's sometimes harder and more expensive than you think). Do you have practical skills that might be useful on your land? All things to consider.

Do we take it from your forum name that you might like to keep bees? If so, that's probably a good place to start. Bees are so important to have around and you could potentially make a little money from them without having a huge amount of land and outlay.

Have you checked out the E-Guide on this site about what to think about before buying your block?

Feel free to ask lots of questions (this site is a great resource and members are very helpful and generous with information, suggestions and advice), but as KatieB said, a lot of this has been covered in the past, so looking back on past posts might help define your questions so we can help you more.

Look forward to hearing more from you.
Cheers, Mich.

PS - one almost universal fact on a LSB - as has been alluded to before - you can make a small fortune off a LSB but you need a large one to start with (or something to that effect, LOL).

Good exercise for the heart is to bend down and help someone up. Anon.

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9 years 1 month ago #501318 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic quick intro - new to NZ
Welcome, and thanks for the interesting questions.
The main answers have been already given, but it seems to me that you might also not be permitted to buy a big enough piece of land to live off. Unless it has recently changed, the maximum area that could be bought by an immigrant was 5 hectares unless you already have enough money to satisfy "Immigration".
When I looked at becoming a real sheep farmer, I worked out that I would need enough area to be able to graze about 2000 sheep, or 300 cattle. Farming is cyclical in that there are about 2 good years, 3 years decreasing profit, 2 years losses, 3 years increasing profits, then back to 2 good years. For sheep and beef we are currently good so we have to save enough now to carry us through the bad years. Thus quite a few real farmers have a partner that works full time.

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9 years 1 month ago #501319 by Negodil
Replied by Negodil on topic quick intro - new to NZ
Hi and welcome to the forum. I won't try to answer your questions, others have already covered that. I will say don't worry about your lack of experience, most of us started that way. My wife and I came from the UK 6 years ago having only had a typical'postage stamp' garden and keeping cats, dogs and tropical fish (they're a lot different from farm animals!). We now have about 7 acres of paddock and breed alpacas. Whatever you want to know, it is likely to have been asked on this forum and if you can't find it, then a lot of people will be very able and willing to help. :)

Fairhaven Alpacas, breeding champion Suri alpaca in Temuka

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9 years 1 month ago #501353 by Blueberry
Replied by Blueberry on topic quick intro - new to NZ

LongRidge;507197 wrote: Welcome, and thanks for the interesting questions.
The main answers have been already given, but it seems to me that you might also not be permitted to buy a big enough piece of land to live off. Unless it has recently changed, the maximum area that could be bought by an immigrant was 5 hectares unless you already have enough money to satisfy "Immigration".
.

Not sure how old that regulation is, LR. we came here 14 years ago, permanent residency under the general category, and bought our 50 acre block within a few months of being here. No-one cared what sort of permit we had.

[;)] Blueberry
treading lightly on mother earth

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9 years 1 month ago #501389 by mc2631
Replied by mc2631 on topic quick intro - new to NZ
Long ridge are you making this stuff up? seriously?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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9 years 1 month ago #501399 by Blueberry
Replied by Blueberry on topic quick intro - new to NZ
well, anyhow, what i wanted to say, bee, is this:

forget about wanting to make an income from your lifestyle block. As the name says, it's a lifestyle - for us from good old europe, the lure is not the income you may potentially be able to generate from it, but the fact that you can own so much land, and do with it what you want - well, mostly!

Even after 14 years, if i had to rate the pleasures i get from out lifestyle block, i'd rate like this:

1. Having no neighbors in direct line of sight from the house - in any direction.

2. OWNING all this land!! - coming home from work in town, driving up our 500m long driveway still gives me a thrill!!!

3. producing most of our own food from our own land - after many years of planting, we now are able to harvest fresh fruit and vegetables any day of the year.

4. being able to have plenty of animals

5. all the possibilities of things i could do on all my land - even though i will most likely never try them all

[;)] Blueberry
treading lightly on mother earth

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9 years 1 month ago #501409 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic quick intro - new to NZ
mc 2361, definitely not. One of our neighbours tried to sell his property in about 2010 to an English couple. They got as far as signing then the lawyer looked at the land area which was 5.1 hectares. They were told that if the area had been 4.999 hectares then no-one would have worried. But 5.0 hectares the Overseas Investment Commission (or some government body) steps in. We NZers don't want foreigners buying our land at inflated prices because these foreigners are going to take the land away with them, and make it too expensive for real NZers to buy land ..... from those of us NZers that need to sell our land at a reasonable profit to fund our retirement .....(oops, I've got off topic).

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9 years 1 month ago #501439 by Anakei
Replied by Anakei on topic quick intro - new to NZ
Longridge is partially right
An “overseas person" must obtain consent under New Zealand’s Overseas Investment Regulations to acquire or take control of significant assets such as business or property worth more than $50 million, land over five hectares or worth more than $10 million and certain sensitive land over 0.4 hectares, such as on islands, near reserves, historical or heritage areas. Don't know if someone on a "parent visa" will come under this

As for being economically viable, of course it all depends on what you consider an income. If you are practicing frugal living and knitting your own spaghetti you may be happy to make $5,000 pa. If you are a businessman looking to make your 10% on investment then you have to go with Longridges calculations.
Then again if you grow something high value like herbs ( not THOSE ones :D )
or salad greens you could make a decent living on a couple of acres.

Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

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9 years 1 month ago #501446 by kindajojo
Replied by kindajojo on topic quick intro - new to NZ

Blueberry;507284 wrote: well, anyhow, what i wanted to say, bee, is this:

forget about wanting to make an income from your lifestyle block. As the name says, it's a lifestyle - for us from good old europe, the lure is not the income you may potentially be able to generate from it, but the fact that you can own so much land, and do with it what you want - well, mostly!

Even after 14 years, if i had to rate the pleasures i get from out lifestyle block, i'd rate like this:

1. Having no neighbors in direct line of sight from the house - in any direction.

2. OWNING all this land!! - coming home from work in town, driving up our 500m long driveway still gives me a thrill!!!

3. producing most of our own food from our own land - after many years of planting, we now are able to harvest fresh fruit and vegetables any day of the year.

4. being able to have plenty of animals

5. all the possibilities of things i could do on all my land - even though i will most likely never try them all

Excellent.....
I find it interesting that people was a LIFESTYLE block ....but combine that with wanting to make money.......if your lifestyle is making money that's ok, but a LSB is not a way of making money unless you have some major investment capital. Normally we cover costs and as above its about having space room to breath experiment with plants and freedom from neighbours.

The country also has its challenges, it's not quiet and peaceful, sometimes it smells, the roads can be rough, the locals are normally friendly, you need to plan a bit more because the dairy isn't at the corner of the street.

Welcome to the country hope you can find a nice piece of land to suit your lifestyle

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9 years 1 month ago #501449 by Name123
Replied by Name123 on topic quick intro - new to NZ

Blueberry;507284 wrote:
5. all the possibilities of things i could do on all my land - even though i will most likely never try them all

I'd be curious to know the things you wanted to do, which you did, and are most proud of actually doing out of all the possibilities :)

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9 years 1 month ago #501454 by Blueberry
Replied by Blueberry on topic quick intro - new to NZ

Name123;507338 wrote: I'd be curious to know the things you wanted to do, which you did, and are most proud of actually doing out of all the possibilities :)

What we COULD do but probably never will do:
- raising/breeding Alpacas/Llamas/pigs/horses/bisons
- growing herbs (yes, THOSE!!)
- milking cows
- building a dog/cat kennel
- founding an animal rescue station
- starting a commune

what we did do:
- planted thousands of fruiting bushes / hundreds of fruiting trees
- built an approved commercial kitchen
- improved the overall health of the farm: Soil, fencing, water system
- help found and operate the local Farmers Market and still sell our products there every Sunday
- built up a fold of Highland cattle, a group of Milking Sheep
- did all that without the use of chemical inputs and other poisons.

what i'm proud of:
we took over a run down block with little productivity and turned it into a productive small holding that feeds us and has plenty of produce left to sell at the local market. We have done so without the use of chemicals or chemical fertilisers. We have turned back about 1/3 of the property into native bush, and in the process, bird life has improved dramatically.

[;)] Blueberry
treading lightly on mother earth

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9 years 1 month ago #501483 by Anakei
Replied by Anakei on topic quick intro - new to NZ
I think you have a lot to be proud of, Blueberry [^]

Urban mini farmer and guerilla gardener

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