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13 years 9 months ago #24007 by Merylcherry
Hello was created by Merylcherry
I am interested in gardening, cooking, craft and animals, my garden is a bare canvas, thanks to a temporary fence which was finally replaced with a permanent one, after sheep got in around the house for the umpteenth time! ( it only took 6 years!!) Where do I start? The edges are all laid out in river stones, twitch is the biggest problem in the soil, Help!!!

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13 years 9 months ago #340376 by Andrea1
Replied by Andrea1 on topic Hello
Hello -- welcome to the forum!!! We have been battling with twitch going on 7 years now. Haven't used chemicals, and won't use chemicals, so manual labour has been the order of the vege patch. I would suggest you take the time to eradicate it before you plant anything, and that will take some time.

We were in a hurry to have a big veggie garden again, so jumped right in, and have had to dig out miles and miles of twitch rhizomes a couple of times a year, or it tangles up everything.

The first thing we did was mulch a very large area for a year, under 3 layers of wool carpet. All it did was push the twitch into hibernation, and it was back in full force within about 6 months.

We also tried raised beds, straw bale height, and within 2 months, the twitch had grown up through the the cardboard and newspaper layers we'd put down at the base of the bed. It even grew THROUGH the concrete cinder blocks we used as a raised bed for the strawberries!!!

In the meantime, we have intensively reared chooks and pigs over another large area, not as suitable for veggies because of all the pine tree roots remaining in the soil after we took the rotting trees down 6 years ago. However, this area is adjacent to the present veggie garden, so not too much further from the access for easy access. And this area, after 6 years with chooks, ducks and pigs on it, is completely free of twitch roots and is very enriched by all the manure that's been dumped on it in the last 6 years.

This may not be the answer to your situation, but if I had this to do all over again, I would get rid of the twitch grass first!!

While we garden in the "new" area, we will put chooks and ducks in the old area for a few years, and put them to work getting rid of the twitch.

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13 years 9 months ago #340377 by Andrea1
Replied by Andrea1 on topic Hello
Hello -- welcome to the forum!!! We have been battling with twitch going on 7 years now. Haven't used chemicals, and won't use chemicals, so manual labour has been the order of the vege patch. I would suggest you take the time to eradicate it before you plant anything, and that will take some time.

We were in a hurry to have a big veggie garden again, so jumped right in, and have had to dig out miles and miles of twitch rhizomes a couple of times a year, or it tangles up everything.

The first thing we did was mulch a very large area for a year, under 3 layers of wool carpet. All it did was push the twitch into hibernation, and it was back in full force within about 6 months.

We also tried raised beds, straw bale height, and within 2 months, the twitch had grown up through the the cardboard and newspaper layers we'd put down at the base of the bed. It even grew THROUGH the concrete cinder blocks we used as a raised bed for the strawberries!!!

In the meantime, we have intensively reared chooks and pigs over another large area, not as suitable for veggies because of all the pine tree roots remaining in the soil after we took the rotting trees down 6 years ago. However, this area is adjacent to the present veggie garden, so not too much further from the access for easy access. And this area, after 6 years with chooks, ducks and pigs on it, is completely free of twitch roots and is very enriched by all the manure that's been dumped on it in the last 6 years.

This may not be the answer to your situation, but if I had this to do all over again, I would get rid of the twitch grass first!!

While we garden in the "new" area, we will put chooks and ducks in the old area for a few years, and put them to work getting rid of the twitch.

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13 years 9 months ago #340378 by Andrea1
Replied by Andrea1 on topic Hello
OK, no idea what happened there... I only hit the button once!!!!

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13 years 9 months ago #340509 by igor
Replied by igor on topic Hello
Hi Merylcherry. Welcome aboard.
I agree with what Andrea has said about using pigs to clear the land before planting. They will destroy all vegetation and enjoy doing it. Just don't do what we did which was leave the pigs in too long. When the wet season came the pigs destroyed the soil structure and it all turned to mud. We had no choice but to leave them there until I could fence another patch for them to go into.

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13 years 9 months ago #24127 by Roswitha
Replied by Roswitha on topic Hello
My husband and I own 25 acres on which we keep some Belted Galloways, Wiltshire sheep and chooks.
We still have to learn a lot, that´s why I think it is the right place for me here :)

cheers
Roswitha

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13 years 9 months ago #341858 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Hello
Welcome. If you must have sheep then the Wiltshire is a much better proposition for you in the damp and swampiness of Clandeboye than most other sheep breeds. Don't be tempted to get goats.

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13 years 9 months ago #341983 by Roswitha
Replied by Roswitha on topic Hello
ooups ... why not goats? Because I just thought to get 2 or 3 goats for keeping the weeds under control. Where we are located the soil is not damp. My only concern is to keep the goats in the paddock, as they are famous for escaping.

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13 years 9 months ago #341996 by kate
Replied by kate on topic Hello
Goats are great, many of us on here wouldn't be without them. They can be difficult to keep in, but many will happily stay where they're put. They're great fun, and very rewarding animals to have around. See here for why you should get goats :D :D

Cheers
Kate

Web Goddess

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13 years 9 months ago #342045 by Roswitha
Replied by Roswitha on topic Hello
Hi Kate
Thank you for the link. :)
I´ll read through, looks really interesting to me.
cheers
Roswitha

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13 years 9 months ago #342176 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Hello
Goats can get through holes that rabbits can't. Mine know how to push under tight deer netting, so the deer fence won't keep them in. When the ground is dry, and their feet are dry, they don't feel the shock of a 7000Volt fence. They have learnt to run through the fence quickly, so now even wet ground and feet won't stop them getting through a hot fence. Unfortunately if they get their horns or legs caught in the netting or fence they die.
Goats catch the same bugs and worms as sheep do, but they get hugely sicker from them than sheep do, so they die much quicker.
Goats horns are dangerous to other animals. We have had a donkey ripped by a goat, and a neighbour needed 14 stitches in his eyelid from a fast-moving horn. Goats will only control the weeds if the grass is insufficient. At other times they will only nibble the weeds.
Goats feet need much more care than your Wiltshires feet will need, unless you are lucky with your goats and unlucky with your sheep.
Some goats die when drenched with levamisol and mixtures of it, which is a very useful worm drench.
It's hugely easier to spray the weeds.

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13 years 9 months ago #342214 by PeterNZ
Replied by PeterNZ on topic Hello

LongRidge;330692 wrote: Goats can get through holes that rabbits can't. Mine know how to push under tight deer netting, so the deer fence won't keep them in. When the ground is dry, and their feet are dry, they don't feel the shock of a 7000Volt fence. They have learnt to run through the fence quickly, so now even wet ground and feet won't stop them getting through a hot fence. Unfortunately if they get their horns or legs caught in the netting or fence they die.
Goats catch the same bugs and worms as sheep do, but they get hugely sicker from them than sheep do, so they die much quicker.
Goats horns are dangerous to other animals. We have had a donkey ripped by a goat, and a neighbour needed 14 stitches in his eyelid from a fast-moving horn. Goats will only control the weeds if the grass is insufficient. At other times they will only nibble the weeds.
Goats feet need much more care than your Wiltshires feet will need, unless you are lucky with your goats and unlucky with your sheep.
Some goats die when drenched with levamisol and mixtures of it, which is a very useful worm drench.
It's hugely easier to spray the weeds.

Gosh LR those Goats must be really dangerous animals. And I thought we do not have any fatal predators in New Zealand. I really consider now moving to Australia where they only have crocodiles and poisonous spiders. Sounds much safer to me.

I wonder why you still have goats if they are so horrible. [;)]

I can pretty much say the exact opposite about my goats. So whose are now the odd one out? Yours or mine?

Cheers

Peter


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13 years 9 months ago #342220 by igor
Replied by igor on topic Hello
Our billy goat has decent horns but the cattle take no crap from him because they are so much bigger and heavier. The ram (he's been dehorned) is a bigger danger to people than the goats because of his temperament.

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13 years 9 months ago #342256 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Hello
Peter, unfortunately for me The Manager is emotionally attached to them so won't allow me. We did stop breeding about 4 years ago though, so they are slowly dieing of old age. If I knew then what I know now, there is absolutely no way that I would have goats. Back then, people only told us the good things about goats .... as they sold their nightmares to us. Been there, done that, never again.

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13 years 9 months ago #342328 by PeterNZ
Replied by PeterNZ on topic Hello
Seriously LongRidge, no offense, but do you think you can see your experiences with goats as the rule or our experiences? We do farm goats for 8 years now and never had issues with fencing, with horns, they don't eat everything as people say, they are just as difficult or easy with parasites as sheep are, we don't have foot rot, we get healthy kids, they don't go even near electric fence except if we switch it off and so on. And to be honest, you can imagine we meet lots of other goat breeders and they more or less have similar experiences as we have made over the years.

I don't want to get into a discussion about right or wrong. But taking all sides into account what do you think would be a realistic recommendation to someone interested in goats? I am sure you are the first one to admit that your statements about goats are quite negative. I think both of us just talk about their experiences. But - again, no offense - your statements always come across as a fact. Are they facts? Or just your experiences?

Cheers

Peter


Everything you need to make your own cheese at home
www.CottageCrafts.co.nz
[:D]LSB Members will get first order (over $10) shipping cost free. Just mention your LSB user name! [:D]

My private blog (Caution! Contains opinions and thoughts which may offend some viewers.)

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