Finally have a patch of dirt!

More
8 years 2 months ago #37321 by mrelshauno
Hi all,

We have been browsing this site for a while now while waiting for an opportunity to come along. Well finally it has in Milton, South Otago.
We only have the one paddock but that'll work fine for what we have time for. Don't want to over commit to something. House is great but ground is run down and hasn't been regularly grazed for years. Keen to get it sorted before we introduce a few sheep and some pigs.
Currently there is no back fence and a paddock of weeds and thistles. Been digging the thistles out by hand but it is killer. There are plenty of smaller prickles and other weeds too. Keen for advice. Not a greenie but not keen on just spraying the whole thing if stock are going to be grazing it.
Nice to be aboard! :D

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 2 months ago #484405 by Deanna
Welcome mrelshauno, can't help with the weeds, we just take a 'Grubber' when ever we go walking. (If there a thistle flower head, remove it to the incinerator, if left lying in the paddock the seeds will release) Hope your all set up for your 1st cold winter. All the best.

25 acres, 1400 Blue Gums, Wiltshire sheep, 5 steers, 2 cows, ducks, chickens, bees, dog, cats, retired, 1 husband and 3 grandkids.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 2 months ago #484411 by LongRidge
Our Miss Piggy was fine with sheep when she was a 300g piglet, but when she got bigger she became a sheep killer. I hoped to train her to round up the sheep, goats, cattle, donkeys to replace Spot the Wonderdog (I wonder why he did that, I wonder where he has gone, etc, etc) but one day Miss Piggy decided that there was no room in her life for the dog, either.
So ..... I personally would not run pigs and sheep together, especially if you plan to have lambs of any size. Pigs can run quickly.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 2 months ago #484421 by igor
Replied by igor on topic Finally have a patch of dirt!
Welcome aboard. Are you from this area originally? I'm not but I came South in '94 so I'm acclimatised now.
Your place sounds a bit like ours was when we bought it. Elderly vendors had been unable to keep it up because of their health so the property was very rundown but priced accordingly or else we could not have afforded to buy it. You say one paddock, how many acres is it?
You might like to consider goats. They will eat the thistles quite happily, sometimes choosing to eat them first and leaving the good grass. Do you like goat milk?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 2 months ago #484424 by Aria
Replied by Aria on topic Finally have a patch of dirt!

igor;488451 wrote: Welcome aboard. Are you from this area originally? I'm not but I came South in '94 so I'm acclimatised now.
Your place sounds a bit like ours was when we bought it. Elderly vendors had been unable to keep it up because of their health so the property was very rundown but priced accordingly or else we could not have afforded to buy it. You say one paddock, how many acres is it?
You might like to consider goats. They will eat the thistles quite happily, sometimes choosing to eat them first and leaving the good grass. Do you like goat milk?


Second that - goats do a marvellous job on thistles.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 2 months ago #484443 by Stu_R
Replied by Stu_R on topic Finally have a patch of dirt!
:) welcome :) :) .. lol :) my Kunekunes were all fine with the sheep and the sheep were with them to :) ... I think Petie pig and the sows Bundy and Coke actually thought they were sheep .. :) and they had 3 litters each in with the sheep and the piglets grew up thinking they were either Sheep or Greyhounds or Japanese Akita dogs :) ... am sure you will love your new place :)

5 retired Greyhounds ( Bridgette , Lilly, GoGo,Sam and now Lenny) 15 friendly sheep all of whom are named and come when you call them :) , 2 goats, Mollie and Eee Bee :
Olive trees , .. old bugger doing the best he can with no money or land :)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 2 months ago #484478 by manymules
Welcome to LSBing. :-) My suggestions would be make your perimeter fence the absolute best you can make it. That way as and when you start with some animals you'll be able to change your mind down the line. I say this because when we moved here I was NEVER going to have anything other than chooks....haha, what a joke that was. :-( So the excellent 1800mm deer fencing that I put around 3/4 of the property to suit the dogs was initially perfect......but then I added goats......and they needed better fencing than what I'd left untouched, and higher fences, and mesh to stop them pushing through....and maybe electric would have been better but....And then I had to add more mesh when the chickens followed the goats into the woodland bit......and then the ducks.......

And so it continued. Had I just done the same as the 3/4 the entire way around right from the start, it would have been ideal......and easy. Money ran out long before I started tweaking fences. I'm so frustrated with fences.

The moral of my longwinded story is that you never know what might evolve animalwise down the line. I hear pigs are up there with goats and randy rams on the fencing front.

Good luck and have fun.

Learning a little bit every day. Loving life. [:D]

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 2 months ago #484502 by igor
Replied by igor on topic Finally have a patch of dirt!
You have raised some good points here manymules. You must have some very pokey goats though. Our dairy goats seem content to remain inside ordinary wire and batten fencing of standard cattle and sheep height. Some of the chooks just fly over a six foot high netting fence so I sometimes wonder why I built it. Pigs are most likely to dig out under the fence so a hot wire at nose height will remind them that this is not a good thing to do.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 2 months ago #484510 by manymules
Igor, probably also a case of overkill, but the goats got into the neighbour's paddock twice and the chooks too on at least a couple of occasions despite a clipped wing. Once burned I wasn't keen for a repeat performance. True, one of my goats is the pushy, argumentative one, looks more feral than her more gentle, affectionate and definately shows traits of a milking breed. I'm thinking long and hard about milking her but still researching.

Learning a little bit every day. Loving life. [:D]

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 2 months ago #484538 by LongRidge
With goats, if the leader knows that it can push under or through netting fences, or move fast enough to not get shocked when running through electric fences, then nothing except a throat-cut will stop it leading some or all of the flock through any sort of fence at all. Over the years I have had to cull many, many goats that have not understood that fences are there for a reason. The 20 we have left are fairly fencetrained. But if you get goats that are not fencetrained then you have to be aware that they will have to be got rid of. Some of our goats pushed under tight deer netting. And some put their heads through the netting and pushed so hard that the upright staytight wires moved far enough apart for the goat to slip through the horizontal wires.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 2 months ago #484542 by manymules
Yep. I know what you mean, longridge. That's why my original dog fence was ideal.....for the entire brood......1800mm deer fencing with square welded mesh along the bottom half. So wish I'd taken it ALL the way around the property. We could have afforded it back then if I'd thought ahead. The welded mesh was to allow for the future puppy who we knew we'd get once our old shepherd passed away. The mesh also stops the chooks and the ducks from sneaking through any gaps. The mesh also means the goats (and our ewe lamb when she was wee) can't push through either. The goats love to walk along the fence line and rub themselves the whole way along. We've had noescapees for a year so I've won the battle......all thanks to welded mesh, but it's hellishly expensive. Still patching 90m of fencing. It's slow going. :-( But no gun necessary. :-)

Learning a little bit every day. Loving life. [:D]

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 2 months ago #485021 by Negodil
Welcome mrelshauno, you'll be able to get plenty of advice here. Sometimes mixed, depending on individuals personal situations so just choose what sounds best for you.

Be prepared for the paddock improvement to take a few years if you're not going to spray out and re-sow. We've got thistles under. Control, not got rid of them just holding even with them scattered around because the neighbour's not so concerned. But I have spent time at night grubbing with a headlight torch.

Best of luck

Fairhaven Alpacas, breeding champion Suri alpaca in Temuka

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 1 month ago #486165 by mrelshauno
Making progress on it. After rain a couple of weeks ago it made it a lot easier to pull thistles out of the ground. We have done multiple trips to the tip and have now had horses in the paddock for two weeks. Grass is well under control and have two very full compost bins brewing nicely with a blend of horse poo , sawdust with a bit of whatever else thrown in.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 1 month ago #486168 by mc2631
good for you :)

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
8 years 1 month ago #486177 by muri
Replied by muri on topic Finally have a patch of dirt!
If you are into making liquid brews, you shouldnt be carting weeds off to the tip but using them as brews. The weeds take different nutrients from the ground so making liquid brews from them can put a lot more nutrients back into your land

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.246 seconds