Conventional Baylage

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8 years 9 months ago #36033 by Keen1
Conventional Baylage was created by Keen1
Hi guys and gals, Im new to this forum and looks like a great source of information and a place to share information etc with like minded people.

I lease a 10 acre property for my three horses and cattle. I am looking into shutting one paddock up from now to process into small baylage bales. Does anyone have any advice on this?

- Do you fertilise these before locking up? In my case these paddocks haven't been fertilised for years as far as I know. If so, what with.

- What contractor is recommended in my area (Henderson valley)?

Will fertilising the paddock before locking up for baylage contribute to a better quality cut?

Any pointers on this would be really helpful!

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8 years 9 months ago #471145 by FencerMan
Replied by FencerMan on topic Conventional Baylage
Hi,

What you really need to do is get a soil test done. This can be arranged through RD1, Farmlands, Ballance or Ravensdown.

Increasing the fertility wont neccasarily increase the quality as such, but will increase the quantity, especially if you have a severe nutrition deficit which is likely if they have not had anything for a long period of time.

Sorry I dont know any contractors in your area....

Also one other tip, especially if you have horses, is to get a broadleaf spray applied now. This will help reduce/eliminate weeds such as dock, thistles etc from your crop!

Do something.

Either lead, follow, or get out of the way.

'Ted Turner'

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8 years 9 months ago #471164 by LongRidge
Replied by LongRidge on topic Conventional Baylage
Adding the missing components to the pasture will most definitely improve the quality of your grass and other pasture. Fertilising also helps the rate of recovery of the pasture. Get a soil test done, but superphosphate at 400kg per hectare is probably needed.
What are you going to feed the balage to? Horses do not have a rumen, so if the mould which often grows in balage is a toxic one, it can poison horses much easier than cattle. Hay does not get these fermentation problems.
Remember with both hay and balage, the most nutritious quality for cattle and sheep is before 10% of the grass has seeded.

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8 years 9 months ago #471217 by Keen1
Replied by Keen1 on topic Conventional Baylage
Thanks LongRidge and FencerMan for your ideas on this. I will look into getting the soil test done and also most definitely sort the weed control..
Have been going to the local sheep and cattle sales while I am working in the area. Very interesting to see what stock is going for and where its heading.. Will see more at the Frankton sales tomorrow :)
I have four rising 12 month old jearsey/angus bulls. I am yet to decide wether to keep them on or get rid of them.
We are planning on buying a 50 acre block in a years time so maybe bringing some stock on now rather than buying stock then maybe a wise idea?
Who has been through this and what were your pros and cons?

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