Newbie to lifestyle farming

More
11 years 4 months ago #34102 by stellafella
Hi.
Just to introduce myself,moved onto 16 acres just before Christmas in between Te Awamutu and Cambridge.Going to have beefies ,couple of lambs,couple of pigs and chooks.
Hope to be on here often for advice..ha ha
:D

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 4 months ago #450757 by LongRidge
Welcome. Unfortunately you have to pay for advice, and it is difficult to arrange payment in this forum. But ..... our suggestions are free, and based upon experience and our reading about the topic and how we understand it. With suggestions, if they don't work for you then the poster does not expect to be sued :-)
Our Miss Piggy ate lambs, and tried to eat the dog, and would have eaten chooks if we had them. I'm not tempted to do pigs again. They are too difficult to keep confined, and fed. All meat, and food scraps with meat in them (eg left-over meat sandwiches) have to be cooked before feeding to pigs.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 4 months ago #450793 by Deanna
Replied by Deanna on topic Newbie to lifestyle farming
Welcome Stellafella from another newbie, not sure I'm want to go pigs either. Just 12 chooks, 1 dog and cat so far. Wishing you all the best.

25 acres, 1400 Blue Gums, Wiltshire sheep, 5 steers, 2 cows, ducks, chickens, bees, dog, cats, retired, 1 husband and 3 grandkids.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 4 months ago #450852 by Ashlee

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
11 years 4 months ago #450855 by John M
Replied by John M on topic Newbie to lifestyle farming
Welcome.

I figured a good 8 wire fence would contain the two weaner piglets I got early on.... yeah right!! AFfer chasing them all over the neighbours farm catching them, I then had to quickly sort a hot wire around the base of the paddock. They quickly learned and there was never any problem after that.

I ringed their noses, but they still rooted in the soft soil. We kept them for maybe three months and then had them home killed for the freezer. At the time, I had access to waste milk which really helped. we supplemented with household vege scraps and pig nuts as needed.

I don't have access to that milk now unfortunately so will have to try and hook up with a local dairy farmer or something. We'd do them again, but I'd do a few things slightly different next time. But that's one of the things that make LSB'ing so fun, is the living and learning :)

John

Breeding black Wiltshire shedding sheep.

Full shedding, easy care, good feet, easy lambing and good mothering is what it takes to make the breeding cut!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.140 seconds