Hello everyone, from Wellington area

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10 years 1 month ago #31855 by horsemaddaughter
Hi everyone, looking forward to this forum. I am just planning what will be a hugely significant change to my life - moving to a lifestyle property on the Kapiti Coast. I come from an urban background, born and bred in London and lived in Wellington since arriving in NZ 22 years ago. But my daughter is horse mad (has been for years) and is now competing a lot and we've managed to acquire a pony and 3 young horses. And I've been paying for grazing in Ohariu Valley for way too many years now, so its time to make the move!

So busy looking for lifestyle blocks - we have decided to buy bare land (10-12 acres, preferably flat) and then build. So I need to learn heaps very quickly - water tanks, septic tanks, rural fencing, quad bikes.

Hoping that this forum will provide loads of info, and when I have a stupid question I am sure there will be lots of help.

It may take another 6 - 9 months before I'm living in the country, but I am so looking forward to it.

"A dream becomes a goal when steps are taken towards its achievement"

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10 years 1 month ago #426519 by Gallowaypye
Hello and welcome. You will learn a lot, and quickly. Hope you enjoy the ride. We built on bare land, elevated, mostly flat, but some hills. I am really glad of the hills, excellent drainage, no fears of flooding, and good for young horses to develop balance and muscles. It's hard and expensive work, but very rewarding. Good luck!

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10 years 1 month ago #426521 by foufee
Hi and welcome.

my parents can relate to the horse mad daughter problem :) I had to wait until I could buy my own block though. From what I hear though what you save in grazing Ohariu should almost cover the mortgage :P

there is a lot to learn moving from city to block fortunately there is much experience available (some quite varied). Asking questions and sifting through the responses will help in many decisions that you will need to make.

good luck

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10 years 1 month ago #426563 by Far Call
I was lucky - I was raised on a huge station - so I had no idea about how much land a horse really needs. I only fed out when I was competing.
Having had a 6month lease for one warmblood last summer, I found that 3acres was good but now realise that without hard feed over winter he would have stripped it bare.

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10 years 1 month ago #426708 by cheeseboard
Hi welcome,

We bought bare land and built. A huge learning curve we are happy with what we have achieved HOWEVER given the chance to do it again we would probably look for an established place just because of the amount of problems we had. Having said that if you find your little piece of paradise and it is bare land go for it (it is worth it problems and all) :confused:

There are a lot more unforseen expenses that you would not have budgeted for :D

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10 years 1 month ago #426756 by horsemaddaughter
Hey thanks for the feedback - I am starting to hear a lot about "hidden" costs. What would you say are the most important things to look out for? I am a senior project manager by profession so pretty experienced at managing to a tight budget :)

"A dream becomes a goal when steps are taken towards its achievement"

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10 years 1 month ago #426767 by Gallowaypye
The two solid rules of building,
1. It will take longer
2. It will cost more.

Boring stuff like septic tanks, and drainage were incredibly expensive, and are surprisingly high maintenance now, requiring frequent servicing, and needing power to work, which makes life interesting during power cuts.
A solar water heating system seemed like a good idea, cost a fortune, and was so completely useless, we now have power heating our water as we frequently ran out mid shower. The water tank is stored on it's side in the roof space, not the most efficient or easy to get to position, so we don't have a hot water cupboard.
We pay an interesting range of rates out here, the straightforward bill, (which rose recently because land in our area is no longer used for mainly farming. We protested and said it damn well still is, they said "tough") and another one for Environment Canterbury, and my favourite one for the privilege of disposing of our own waste water.
Council rules change often too, somehow during our building, new requirements came into being involving water filters. We had only had them installed a couple of months before finding out we no longer complied, and had to upgrade.
Sorry to sound so negative, but you did ask. This was our fourth house built from scratch, and it was by far the most difficult even though it was the simplest design of the lot. Not that we regret it, we love living here, but deep down I'm certain if my husband had known then what we know now, we'd be in some lovely old restored villa, mortgage free, in town.

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