Hi fellow LSB folk!

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12 years 7 months ago #21084 by Hawkspur
Hi fellow LSB folk! was created by Hawkspur
Hi folk!
I am a quasi lifestyle block person because I am not yet living on mine. We have had it for 6 or 7 years now, and our house in town has suffered because we put our efforts into the block rather than the house!

Our land is steep gorse covered 20 ha on Banks Peninsula, and we are not running any stock. (We don't have fences or water) and our aim is native revegetation, pluys a crazy loooong term dream of my spouse's to run a ride-on train around a contour. It can bring the wood to the house from the woodlot.[;)]

Our plans to build have been delayed several times. Half the driveway slipping away or being buried in the very wet winter last year didn't help. Moving many truckloads of spoil is rather a budget killer. We now have plans to live in a container. :D

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12 years 7 months ago #307377 by witheze
Replied by witheze on topic Hi fellow LSB folk!
Unless you have a magnificent ocean location your lsb sounds like my worst nightmare..... :D

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12 years 7 months ago #307706 by Hawkspur
Replied by Hawkspur on topic Hi fellow LSB folk!
A lot of people have said the same: they think we're nuts. To make it sound even more attractive the land faces due southwest. This is actually really great because with the low rainfall here every drop is desirable.

The gorse is very dense. We have not yet got into our back gully because we'd need to chainsaw a path, and the effort is best spent in other places. (When I say dense I mean branches too thick to push or slash through - some of the trunks we have found are 200mm diameter. I have crawled down some tunnels made by sheep but that wasn't much fun.)
We are keeping the gorse as a nursery plant, rather than clearing it. The land was too steep and not suitable for the sheep and cattle that had been run on it 20 years + ago, which is why the farmer subdivided it after giving up in despair. (The higher areas on the hills above us are now forestry.)

Our gorse is working really well as a nursery too (now that we have shot the sheep that had been left to run wild and were eating the seedlings- they were very sad animals). The mahoe etc seeded by the older trees in the gullies are shooting away in the shelter of the gorse and some are well over a metre high.

No we don't have an ocean view: just a lake view. [;)]

I know this sounds really desirable :D but we love the wildness of it and the fact it is less than 45min from the CBD, I just wish there was somewhere to run a horse... but on our 50 acres there is no pasture and only 2 flat spots- (the tops of ridges)each of which is smaller than a tennis court.

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12 years 6 months ago #307766 by Pumpkingirl
Replied by Pumpkingirl on topic Hi fellow LSB folk!
It sounds like a lot of work Hawkspur, but it will be immensely satisfying I would think.

Have you got a good throwing arm? Making up seed balls to throw/catapault/launch into the gorse would speed up your reclamation no end :D

Manuka or Kaunuka would be good options, along with mahoe - all easy to sow, they like gorse (nitrogen-fixing) and they are all "nursery" plants through which great forests grow.

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12 years 6 months ago #307801 by Hawkspur
Replied by Hawkspur on topic Hi fellow LSB folk!
Thanks Pumpkingirl. Yes indeed we have looked at this. We even toyed with the idea of ones formed into clay targets, then thrown by the trap and shot at to disperse them further over the gullies. :D
We may do the seed balls with the species that are less prevalent on our land. The mahoe are seeding really nicely all by themselves, as there are established ones on the more vertical faces that probably survived burn-offs.

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