Dying an already made Merino cardigan

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7 years 5 months ago #526031 by Kiwi Tussock
Has anyone had experience on dying a woolen garment that is already made?
I have found a nice cardigan (Rod & Gunn Merino) at a Sallies Shop but its the colour I don't like. (Black).
If it can be done, can anyone give some ideas how I can do it. (pretty please)
Ta

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7 years 5 months ago #526043 by kai
If it is black you would need to bleach it first then use a cold water dye
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7 years 5 months ago #526049 by Kiwi Tussock
Thanks for that hint.
Is that with a product like Janola or is it a particular type of colour removing bleach?

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7 years 5 months ago #526053 by Ruth
Wouldn't that destroy the wool?

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7 years 5 months ago #526072 by Hawkspur
Don't use chlorine bleach on wool (or silk), as it will dissolve them.
Hydrogen peroxide will bleach wool, as it does hair, but the effect on the dye in the wool will depend on the dye, so perhaps test a small piece to find out what it does.
The peroxide used to bleach hair is up to about 40% concentration, and will need gloves and careful handling.
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7 years 5 months ago #526073 by spark

Hawkspur wrote: The peroxide used to bleach hair is up to about 40% concentration, and will need gloves and careful handling.


NO. If someone tried to use 40% H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) to bleach hair, I'd expect it to burn the scalp! - cosmetic grade H2O2 is something like only 3% (aka V10) to 12% (V40).
"industrial" H2O2 is typically supplied at 50% concentration (and is pretty potent stuff). The next step up from that is HTP (High Test Peroxide) which is 90-something percent concentration, and probably isn't available in NZ - it is a strong enough oxidiser that it is used for some rocket motors...
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7 years 5 months ago #526074 by muri
Its a long time since I have dyed anything, but the shops selling dyes also sell something that enables you to take the colour out of a fabric before you re-dye it
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7 years 5 months ago #526077 by Hawkspur
Thanks for the correction. One source I used confused oxygen released by volume with % concentration. So some hair bleach is 12% peroxide, which equates to a releasing 40 times its volume in oxygen.
3% is the low end for cosmetic peroxide, and about 12% is the high end.

spark wrote:

Hawkspur wrote: The peroxide used to bleach hair is up to about 40% concentration, and will need gloves and careful handling.


NO. If someone tried to use 40% H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) to bleach hair, I'd expect it to burn the scalp! - cosmetic grade H2O2 is something like only 3% (aka V10) to 12% (V40).
"industrial" H2O2 is typically supplied at 50% concentration (and is pretty potent stuff). The next step up from that is HTP (High Test Peroxide) which is 90-something percent concentration, and probably isn't available in NZ - it is a strong enough oxidiser that it is used for some rocket motors...

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7 years 5 months ago #526129 by John M
I have done spot dye correction on carpets, mainly wool for a number of years now. A few things I have learnt is to under promise and over deliver! I know it's you doing it, but peg your expectations low, and if it turns out brilliant, great.

Keep in mind my experience, a fixed fabric (carpet) that I have surface access to only. You have an advantage of being able to immerse. Having said that, dyeing can be a fickle thing... I always start with a thorough wash/clean and then neutralise the alkali detergent. This is mainly to remove dust, oils, contamination that may hinder either the stripping or dyeing process. It also enables a clear and thorough inspection.

I purchased the H202 in 25l drums at 50% solution and diluted it down to various percentages for different uses from stain removal to dye stripping etc. I also carried a powdered product, whose name escapes me (edit: sodium perforate I think) that I also used for dye stripping, and it was a bit more aggressive when used with good heat. With H202, I tended to start with a weaker solution, and add heat rather than increasing the strength of the solution. I rarely went over 9%, and never over 12%.

Given that you are wanting to strip black, I'd have concerns that you will get an even strip... but I guess it all depends on what you are wanting to dye it back to. That may allow for some degree of flexibility. I'm not sure how even it will be across joins, folds, collar, cuffs etc.

Then you have to hope like crazy that the prior use, or the stripping hasn't compromised the ability to take and hold new dyes. In carpet, anything that the homeowner had done prior to my getting there may have compromised the abiality to re dye. I have a near new wool job a couple years ago, that refused to set. It didn't matter what I did, how much setting agent, or heat was applied. Once dry, I could rinse it all straight back out with water and a mild detergent. You won't know till to try unfortunately.

If it's cheap, and you want/enjoy the challenge, go for it, you have little to loose and experience to gain.

For carpets, I don't do much of that in my current role at all, but when I do, I have since moved to solid dye sticks for most of that now and it gives greater flexibility and over quicker results.

John

Breeding black Wiltshire shedding sheep.

Full shedding, easy care, good feet, easy lambing and good mothering is what it takes to make the breeding cut!
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7 years 4 months ago #526296 by Kiwi Tussock
Well, this IS going to be a Learning Experience, that's for sure! I have never tried anything like this. I do have access to H2O2 so it will be worth 'giving it a go'. Maybe I'll give my grey hairs a fright to. :lol:
Thanks all.

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7 years 4 months ago #526450 by Baroque
It'll be interesting to hear how this turns out. Usually I've dyed lighter things darker, and the thought of bleaching black wool to dye another shade has me quaking in my boots. :unsure:

Be prepared for it to look a bit patchy....

It may be worthwhile looking at some of the dye makers/sellers for good quality wool dyes, as they should have a better range of product available.

Good luck!

Breeding & training quality Spanish horses - THE horse of Kings! Also breeding Arapawa & Pitt Island sheep.
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