PDA

View Full Version : When to worm lambs ?


mhddp
25th September 2007, 11:32 AM
I bought in some ewes with lambs which means I now have lambs ranging in age from 2 - 10 weeks. When should I worm them ? I was told to do it at 3 months to delay resistence but I will find it hard sorting them out with such a wide range of ages. Can I do it say when some are 12 weeks and some are 4 weeks ? or should I wait till they are ALL at least 8 weeks or ??? I noticed the other day that there are little blobs of gooyey browny/black things in the paddock. Are these worms ? Some of the older lambs now have black bums so I'm thinking they need to be wormed soon !

PeterNZ
25th September 2007, 11:38 AM
quote:Originally posted by mhddp

I bought in some ewes with lambs which means I now have lambs ranging in age from 2 - 10 weeks. When should I worm them ? I was told to do it at 3 months to delay resistence but I will find it hard sorting them out with such a wide range of ages. Can I do it say when some are 12 weeks and some are 4 weeks ? or should I wait till they are ALL at least 8 weeks or ??? I noticed the other day that there are little blobs of gooyey browny/black things in the paddock. Are these worms ? Some of the older lambs now have black bums so I'm thinking they need to be wormed soon !


You should deworm lambs only if it is necessary. I had a very interesting talk with Dr. Clive Dalton and he agreed that you should not deworm lambs in the first 9 months of their live if it isn't necessary! Worm drench during the first 9 months has an impact on the development of natural resistance of lambs. If you drench as little as necessary you will get healthier and more resistant lambs.

Cheers

Peter

spoook
25th September 2007, 11:43 AM
Have you thought about getting a fecal egg count done? Just because their bums are dirty does not mean they have worms, the spring grass could be causing it.
I don't want to open up the ongoing discussion of "to worm or not to worm" but you could be administering chemicals for no reason.

Do you know if the ewes had their 5in1 pre-lambing jab? If not, treat both the ewes and lambs as if they have not had anything.
This would be more of a concern than the worming issue. What you innocluate against can kill faster that worms.

Contact your vet to enquire what an FEC would cost. You would only need to supply a random sample from a few of the flock to get a general reading. This will tell you if you will need to drench and maybe, what with.

hilldweller
25th September 2007, 11:45 AM
You could get a faecal egg count done on a few of the lambs to see if worms are a problem. Are the lambs growing well?

mhddp
25th September 2007, 11:57 AM
The lambs look great. They have a kinda "bloom" to their coats and look plumpish. My experienced neighbour says they should be done with something that kills tape at least as lambs are very susceptible. Just wondering "When" to do it, seeing as their ages range so much and the fact that I saw some of these lumpy gooey blobs in the paddock.

PeterNZ
25th September 2007, 12:03 PM
Sorry sounds very much like the John Wayne Principle: " Shoot first, then ask questions!"

Forgot something![:I]

:D;)[8D][}:)][:p]

Cheers

Peter

reggit
25th September 2007, 12:08 PM
Get the Clive Dalton booklet on worms and get your head around it [:I] - http://www.lifestyleblock.co.nz/homelinks/books.htm

We only drench now if the FECs are high, not as a standard practice. Means more running after sheep with poo bottles [}:)]

spoook
25th September 2007, 12:22 PM
:( My thoughts too Peter.

Mhdp, if your lambs do not have worms you are wasting your time and money and helping the major problem that NZ is encountering of drench resistance.:(

To give you an idea, my vet charges $8 for one test with a further $5 each if you want individual animals tested, hence I suggest a random sample from a few head. They do the tests in-house so if the samples are sent away by your vet it could cost more.
This is far cheaper and less labour than giving your stock drench on a regular basis when not needed. Also better for the stock too:D

reggit
25th September 2007, 12:24 PM
Could their messy bums also be from the lush spring grass? [:I]

LongRidge
25th September 2007, 01:02 PM
When you do worm, only do the ones that need it. If you can see bits of tapeworms (they look like a bit of white snot in the poo, but they can dangle out the bum if they haven't broken into bits) then they very probably have other worms as well.
With Fecal Egg Counts, remember that zero eggs DOES NOT mean no worms. It can mean that the worms are having a huge party inside the sheep, but haven't laid any eggs yet.

mhddp
25th September 2007, 01:43 PM
If lambs HAVE TO be wormed, at what age range do they get done ?

hilldweller
25th September 2007, 01:48 PM
The Dalton/Orr sheep farming guide includes drenching for roundworms and tapeworms under the list of things to do at weaning 12-16 weeks.

Your very young ones certainly wouldn't need it as they won't have been grazing long enough to have developed a worm problem.

Inger
25th September 2007, 05:59 PM
Lambs still feeding on their mums, tend to have the extra bonus of the milk making lift difficult for worms to survive. I would suggest that if the lambs are growing nicely, leave them alone. If individual lambs start not thriving, then drench just those ones, note or eartag them and if they keep needing repeated drenching in the future, reserve a place for them in the freezer, if you have enough sheep to spare some for eating.

LongRidge
25th September 2007, 06:41 PM
mhddp ...... ONLY when they need it. For twins or triplets (which eat more grass from a younger age) this might be as young as 6 weeks, and for singles on long grass might be never.

mhddp
25th September 2007, 07:27 PM
That's interesting Longridge. didn't know that before - that twins or triplets start eating earlier than singles. It turns out that I don't actually wean my lambs. They get weaned when it's freezer time. I find this a good way of keeping the ewes' weight down otherwise they would be obese. Even though I put them in shorter paddocks they do really well.

kindajojo
26th September 2007, 08:18 AM
have the lambes been vaccinated and if so if they were done with Nilvax check as this has a wormer in it as well...it is not recommended to drench and vaccinate .
They should have been vaccinated at 20kgs..and again four weeks later so they may have got some protection

LongRidge
26th September 2007, 09:27 AM
mhddp .... most twins and triplets have to because they only have half or a third the milk that a single has ....

belia
26th September 2007, 09:26 PM
I have two orphan lambs they are six weeks.Wil get 5 in 1 from the vet tomorrow. At what stage shall I worm my little ones.According to the vet they should be wormed as soon as they start eating grass.I am at a loss on this subject as there are different opinions love to get some concrete advise any help would be appreciated

Ronney
26th September 2007, 10:29 PM
Lordy, lord, what a performance. mhddp, if your lambs have a "bloom" to them and are looking fat and healthy, there is no need to drench them. The dirty bums are more likely to be the result of fresh spring growth which is going straight through them rather than a result of worms. Every sheep farmer with more than a couple of sheep has an age range but with lambs on their mothers and still on milk, that shouldn't matter. The norm therefore is for all lambs to have their first drench at weaning. If yours are weaned into the freezer you can monitor their condition and drench as needed or you can drench the whole lot when the youngest is around 12 weeks of age. When you do this, you can either choose a broad spectrum drench which covers all worms or go for one that targets tape. Both are available. Much also depends on your management - the more frequently you can move your sheep around on to fresh pasture, the less need there is for worming.

Anna, being orphan lambs my bet is that they are grazing the lawn and wherever else you happen to be:) I know mine do and they don't get drenched. Hand reared lambs are often in a position to graze a wide area and worms are usually not a problem. All lambs will start to nibble grass around the 2-3 week old mark but that isn't a reason to drench them.

Interestingly enough, milk is thought to be a worm inhibitor if fed to pigs. As a keeper of pigs that get fed lots of milk, I would go along with that. I also think that it is true of young animals still on their mother. I don't think I have ever seen a worm infested lamb or calf that is still being fed milk. I have seen lambs with tape worm but their body condition is excellent. Something to think on.

Cheers,
Ronnie

belia
26th September 2007, 11:17 PM
Makes sense Ronney what you are saying mine are still on anlamb and are fed small amounts each time with a combination of grazing if you watch ewes and their little ones that is what they are doing.Many thanks

LongRidge
27th September 2007, 11:02 AM
belia, there are as many theories about drenching as there are experts. The science is not understood at all well, so nobody can give one suggestion that will be correct for everyone. With my 100 lambs I will have about 5 different drenching regimes (which will confuse The Manager because she still thinks that drenching has to be done to a timetable ....).
The singles that are going to the works will get a drench soon, at 6 weeks. It doesn't matter that they don't develop antibodies to worms.
The twins have been drenched, at 5 weeks, to give them minerals and delay them catching worms (but I should not have done the ones that didn't need it). Their mothers have not been drenched, so that when the lambs catch worms they will be from the eggs that the ewes shed, so those worms won't be resistant to the drench that I used.
The ewe lambs that I am keeping will only get drenched if they look poorly, and that will be one of the deciders as to whether we keep them.
The ewes will only get drenched when they look poorly.
Depending on the weather and how long the grass is, the wether lambs might all get drenched if the grass does not start growing soon, or maybe only the poorly ones will if the grass manages to grow a bit longer faster, so the worms can't climb up the grass to reinfest the lamb.