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Old 16th April 2012, 10:38 AM   #1
pisa
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Price Question for grazing

Hi all,

what is the current price for grazing on a hilly paddock, about 2-3 acres, with a little pond as water access?
Previously had been used for sheep only, nothing done to it in the past 6-9 months.

TIA
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Old 16th April 2012, 10:43 AM   #2
GrantK
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Re: Price Question for grazing

We have some cows at another person's place for service with their bull. They are charging us $1 per day per animal, which we think is reasonable for a short-term arrangement.
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Old 16th April 2012, 11:44 AM   #3
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Re: Price Question for grazing

What are you grazing? If 1 sheep gives 1.2 lambs and some wool then the return is about $130 per year, so $2.50 per week if it were your sheep on your land. So the grazier should pay about $1.20 per week to use your land, but you should use that money to improve your land by fertilising and spraying. So, at current prices for wool and lambs, and assuming you have yards and loading facilities, $1.20 per week per adult sheep while it is there.
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Old 16th April 2012, 12:23 PM   #4
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Re: Price Question for grazing

so do you don't account for the leasor rates and liability when leasing the land who is responbile for the liability?
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Old 16th April 2012, 12:42 PM   #5
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Re: Price Question for grazing

@LR: I'm grazing my milking goats on the neighbours' paddock at the moment.
Just in case he decides to charge me money instead of goods, I want to check what a realistic price would be. As far as I know the paddock would stay unused if I couldn't have the goats in it. They're "cleaning" it up of the occasional gorse and broom for now.
If I were to use the paddock long term, it would need a few improvements to make it 99% goat proof, and a gate added on our adjoining fence line. These things would all have to be taken into consideration as well. As well as a few shelter huts put up. But as I do those things on our land myself, I would do them for that paddock too.
@webby: I assume I would be responsible for any breakages etc, as long as the fence was in good condition when I took over.
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1 hubby, 2 kids, 2 cats, 1 dog, 2 swallows and I've lost count offspring with even more grandkids, 3 bunny girls, 3 bunny boys, 27 chicken(rooster, pullets, cockerels), 5 ducks and two goats with one whether at foot!
But who's counting

http://petraalsbachstevens.blogspot.com

http://pounuiresortrestaurantcafe.blogspot.com
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Old 16th April 2012, 07:44 PM   #6
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Re: Price Question for grazing

Less than $1 per week for goats, because they don't eat clover, and do eat plants that are a nuisance for other animals and humans ..... those things that you call weeds :-)
Webby, I don't understand your question. The liability responsibility is whatever is agreed between the land owner and the animal owner. If I put animals into a paddock that I know they will escape from, then that is my responsibility. If my animals die because of lack of water when I have been guaranteed a water supply, then that is the land-owners responsibility. I have had animals get killed/kill themselves when out grazing. Unless I can prove that the gates have been changed, or some other negligence on the part of the land-owner or their guests, then that is a cost I have to carry.
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Old 17th April 2012, 02:54 AM   #7
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Re: Price Question for grazing

How much would be a reasonable price for renting about 5 Ha of steep hilly paddock in the Waikato? Difficult to say stock numbers (only 7 alpacas at the moment but this will change) so we want a 'whole area' price rather than a stock unit price.
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Old 17th April 2012, 07:15 AM   #8
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Re: Price Question for grazing

Webby, I don't understand your question. The liability responsibility is whatever is agreed between the land owner and the animal owner. If I put animals into a paddock that I know they will escape from, then that is my responsibility. If my animals die because of lack of water when I have been guaranteed a water supply, then that is the land-owners responsibility. I have had animals get killed/kill themselves when out grazing. Unless I can prove that the gates have been changed, or some other negligence on the part of the land-owner or their guests, then that is a cost I have to carry.[/QUOTE]

Longridge I was asking how do you cover the costs of the owners rates and liability costs with insurance,( which you have pretty much answered) I assume most property owners have these costs to be covered and if stock does get out who covers the cost of some ones car being damaged do most people just take the risk or is there a legal lease written up to cover such things, just putting the question out there as we might be wanting to lease some land at a later date
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Old 17th April 2012, 07:34 AM   #9
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Re: Price Question for grazing

Quote:
Originally Posted by LongRidge View Post
Less than $1 per week for goats, because they don't eat clover, and do eat plants that are a nuisance for other animals and humans ..... those things that you call weeds :-)
I have to question this, having been out to Pisa's last week to drop of the smelly boy, who immediately hoed into the clover. Which they never touch at home.
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Old 17th April 2012, 07:37 AM   #10
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Re: Price Question for grazing

For the damage issue related to animals on the road, you should have 3rd party insurance at the very least.
We rented 3 acres a couple of years ago for $150 per annum and we could put as much or as little stock on it as we wished. We also had a verbal agreement to put fertilizer on it when we vacated the paddock, but we also cut a fair bit of hay off it, so consider we got a good deal.
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Old 17th April 2012, 07:42 AM   #11
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Re: Price Question for grazing

I was looking at grazing a 2 acre paddock across the road and we came to the conclusion that it is worth about $10 per week in grazing fees.

Last year 200+ bales of hay were cut in this paddock (land owner gets no hay or payment for this) and it gets grazed twice a year "to keep the grass under control" by another neighbor.

This paddock does not have water connected so I would have had to bring water across the road each day and I would have had to have put a gate in on the road access as the owners have planted a vege garden in the access lane

As we had such a good summer for growing this year I didn't need to go ahead. Maybe next year...
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Old 17th April 2012, 10:04 AM   #12
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Re: Price Question for grazing

Xartep .... goats are like that :-) When there is something that they absolutely will not eat then they do, and vice versa :-) So re-phrasing my statement .... As a generalisation, goats don't like to eat much clover, and tend to limit themselves much more than other animals.
topcat, that depends on how well the area grows the sort of pasture that you want, the fencing that you want, the water reliability, yarding, etc. The pastures that I graze are naturally a low fertility, so fertiliser is needed. Until recently the amount and cost of fertiliser was such that to improve the landowners property then most of the income from grazing was needed for fertiliser. So if I had to also do the fertilising then I would be making absolutely nothing from my animals at best, and a loss usually. This, and owners wanting to exercise their dogs, motorbikes, other peoples animals, cut down trees, dump rubbish, have fires, shoot rabbits etc means that for me a fixed per annum rental is not profitable for me. Also it does not encourage the landowner to maintain their property.
$100 per acre per year was fair when the animal prices were half what they are now. At the moment you should also do the fertilising or increase the rental to $150 per acre. But when the prices change then negotiate downwards.
With animals on the road, we have Public Liability Insurance, and have used it once. The law is very unclear on who is faulty if an animal causes an accident. The driving rules state that you must be able to stop in half the distance of clear road ahead of you. Thus if you hit the animal you were going too fast. The fencing rules state that the fence must be "adequate" for the type of animal that you are fencing in. But if you have a non-average animal (that escapes where others don't), then the fence must be made adequate for that animal, or the animal got rid of. Thus, as the rules can be interpreted, an animal can get out of a hole once, but if it gets out the same hole that has not been made adequate (ie repaired) then the land owner is at fault.
All sorts of lease agreements can and have been written up, but under contract law a verbal agreement is as valid as a written one. If everything gets messy, a written agreement is no more use than a verbal one, because when that happens the hostile party remains hostile, whether or not anything is in writing. Now that I've been doing verbals for a long time, I would give the land owner a couple of pages of what I expect and will do.
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